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The networked student and knowledge worker

Joitske Hulsebosch eLearning

So it could be the knowledge worker2.0 Irene Hanraets alerted me about this video about the networked student by wdrexler: The way the networked student uses web2.0 services is basically the way I use them. I wonder though, about individual paths and diversity. I don't think learning by blogging works for every student, or does it? What do you think? And what does it mean for education.

Knowledge Worker Take Ownership

Tony Karrer

Must read post by Michele Martin - Changing Knowledge Worker Attitudes. That's it - knowledge workers must take ownership. I had chills as I read it. I believe that we have to start with making people conscious of the fact that they own the most precious resource in just about any organization today–the power of their ideas, social connections and thought processes. And it's the responsibility of learning professionals to lead that charge. Join this discussion on Work Literacy

Knowledge Worker Take Ownership

Clark Quinn

Must read post by Michele Martin - Changing Knowledge Worker Attitudes. That's it - knowledge workers must take ownership. I had chills as I read it. I believe that we have to start with making people conscious of the fact that they own the most precious resource in just about any organization today-the power of their ideas, social connections and thought processes. And it's the responsibility of learning professionals to lead that charge. Join this discussion on Work Literacy

Concept Worker

Tony Karrer

But then he describes how we've really moved on past that to a new age where the dominant value for most organizations are created by high-end knowledge workers working on concepts. But, I actually think we should be focused on the emphasis on the type of knowledge work and the type of workers. Concept Work and Concept Worker I've often been a little bothered by the fact that we categorize the a person working in a call center handling customer service requests in the same category as an engineer working in R&D - they are both called knowledge workers.

Learn Trends 2008 - Free

Tony Karrer

George Siemens , Jay Cross and Tony Karrer have organized the second annual free online conference: Corporate Learning: Trends and Innovation 2008 November 17 - 21, 2008 | Online | Free Last year's conference had two thousand people from all over the world take part in the week-long conference. Speakers and topics include: Alvaro Fernandez: Brain Fitness for Peak Health and Performance Dave Gray: Visual Literacy, Learning Innovation Kevin Wheeler: The Future of Talent Dave Pollard - Working Smarter: Improving the personal productivity of knowledge workers.

Corporate Learning Long Tail and Attention Crisis

Tony Karrer

The average knowledge worker has access to an increasingly large set of information resources and corporate learning is an ever smaller part of this set. Cost is most often not a factor in a knowledge workers decision about the use of information. How do we foster knowledge worker skills? John Seely Brown and Richard P. A whole range of challenges result.

Web 2.0 Corporate Access

Clark Quinn

Corporations have not woke up to the need for knowledge workers to reach out for expertise. I’ve been working with Steve Wexler and the eLearningGuild on the eLearning 2.0 survey. This is resulting in some pretty interesting data such as the Web 2.0 Tools Used in corporations. One of the comments I received on Network Effects - YouTube - Video Blogs and More that had a video hosted on YouTube was: We see and hear more and more about corporate content published on YouTube. How many companies are giving their employee's access? tools. So, YouTube is blocked 27.7%. Digg 9.8%

Learning 2.0 Strategy

Clark Quinn

implies some pretty significant changes in the way that organizations look at the role of a knowledge worker, management, the learning/training organization, boundaries of organizations, when you reach across boundaries, etc. The idea that workers/learners have largely become the instruments of learning and that learning is not controlled or controllable is something that causes all sorts of culture questions. Prepare Workers for Learning 2.0 I was a bit surprised by the lack of preparation of workers for web 2.0 on learning. strategy. Strategy 1. solutions.

Ten Predictions for eLearning 2008

Tony Karrer

The Big Question this month are Predictions for Learning in 2008. during 2008. Prediction #2 => Virtual Classroom Tools - Meeting Tool + Second Life Lite A medium size Virtual Classroom / Meeting Tool will announce features in 2008 that are not 3D immersive, but that are more like Mii characters in a 2.5D Prediction #10 => Knowledge Worker Skills - Just Beginning in 2008, Big in 2009 The discussion of knowledge work skills is going to be BIG. There will be increasing pressure on each of us to understand eLearning 2.0 world. Why not record it?

PWLE Not PLE - Knowledge Work Not Separate from Learning

Tony Karrer

I mentioned quite a while ago (in Personal Work and Learning Environments (PWLE) - More Discussion and Personal Work and Learning Environments ) that: Knowledge work is not separate from learning. Yes, there are times that Knowledge Workers will step away from day-to-day activities to go do developmental learning activities that may not be directly related to their day-to-day knowledge work. To me, it does not make sense to look at using one environment (an LMS or PLE) as part of learning and another environment as part of knowledge work.

2008 in retrospect

Jay Cross

I’m closing the chapter on 2008 and gearing up for 2009 and beyond. Keynoted Learning Technologies 2008 in London. Knowledge workers have replaced factory workers. Shareholders owned the factories, but workers own their minds. Information spreading through network connections empowers workers to make decisions and take responsibility for them. Give workers the resources and challenge them to do what’s required. Learnscapes : where informal learning and knowledge work converge. Looking back, I see lots of smoke but little fire.

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Sun, Elite, and the future

Jay Cross

In a knowledge society, work and learning are the same thing. A learnscape is the platform where knowledge workers collaborate, solve problems, converse, share ideas, brainstorm, conceptualize, tell stories, help one another, teach, keep up to date, forge partnerships, build communities, and distribute information. College kids are different these days. Check this out.).

DevLearn 2008 - Day 1 Recap

eLearning Weekly

Day 1 of DevLearn 2008 kicked off today with a great keynote from Tim O’Reilly ( @TimOReilly ), where he walked us through the Web 2.0 On average, corporate workers will return an email within a 4-hour time span. The same workers will, on average, return an answer to a text message with 6 minutes. For knowledge workers, work and learning are inseparable. We are making a transition from information workers to concept workers. movement and how it has impacted learning and training. The idea of Web 2.0 Web 2.0 Web 2.0 Web 2.0 Web 2.0

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To-learn list?

Jay Cross

As a knowledge worker, learning is my work. Do you have a to-learn list? A to-learn list is like a curriculum. It presupposes foreknowledge of what we need to know. The faster our world changes, the more often we will face with novel situations. We don’t know what we’ll need to know. Hence, we’d better get good at meta-learning: learning to learn. Beyond that, the democratization of work requires that we be not only our own teachers, but our own instructional designers. I have dozens of to-learn lists. File ‘em and forget ‘em.

Evaluating Performance of Concept Workers

Tony Karrer

I've recently been talking to people about evaluating performance of Concept Workers. Evaluating concept worker performance is an interesting challenge: No right answer - Most often there is no single right answer. Evaluator knowledge limit - In most cases, the person doing the performance evaluation knows less about the subject that the performer. Is my answer reasonable?

List to Learn, Learn to List

Kapp Notes

I don't totally agree that work and learning are exactly the same, there is some overlap but there are specific things workers need to learn that do not result in a direct work product. For example, a knowledge worker may need to learn how to write a report more effectively but still may produce a report (work product) on time for the boss by working on the weekend. Is so how?

ASTD TechKnowledge

Tony Karrer

These changes are continuously transforming the landscape for knowledge work. The results are in, and most knowledge workers are struggling to adapt to new forms of work and learning. In this keynote, Dr. Tony Karrer will look at the transformation of knowledge work into concept work and the implications for the roles and responsibilities of learning professionals. We will look over the shoulder of a modern knowledge worker using e-learning 2.0 Learning Trends 2008 - Online - Free [link ASTD TechKnowledge 2009 is coming to Las Vegas in January.

Cammy Beans Learning Visions: This job aint dead yet.

Learning Visions

What strikes me about this whole DIY/informal learning/death of ISD conversation is that what were really talking about are those so-called motivated knowledge workers. Cammy Beans Learning Visions Musings on eLearning, instructional design and other training stuff. Thursday, March 01, 2007 This job aint dead yet. Its ok Dan. Were not dead yet. These are the folks in the corporate world. These are guys who will take informal learning by the horns and run with it. And they do. They get raises and promotions for being smart. Although that describes most of us, right?) eLearnin.

The Big Question: Leading the charge

Clive on Learning

concept must be appropriate to the organisation, and this is open to question when you're looking beyond knowledge workers. In the Learning Circuits Blog , Tony Karrer poses a whole series of questions related to the role of learning and development professionals in promoting informal learning / social learning / learning 2.0 This is sadly a a long way short of reality. Absolutely.

Three tiers in the content pyramid

Clive on Learning

Rapid development The lower tier would be 'good enough' digital content, designed to communicate simple information or provide basic knowledge without fuss. Back in December I posted about what I predicted would become e-learning's two tiers. To remind you: High end The top tier would be e-learning that delivers something special, something that can't be achieved easily other ways.

Knowledge Work Types

Tony Karrer

Several people have asked for some clarification on my definition of Concept Work and Concept Workers. Thomas Davenport classifies Knowledge Work Types in Thinking for a Living: How to Get Better Performances And Results from Knowledge Workers using a variety of classifications. Within that he then defined the following types of knowledge workers: Transaction Worker - Routine, individual, ex. Integration Worker - Routine, collaborative, ex. systems development Expert Worker - Interpretation/judgment, individual, ex. call center.

Delicious Upgrade Only Skin Deep

Tony Karrer

When you think about what knowledge workers need relative to Keep / Organize / Refind / Remind, I've discussed in The New Skills that we want to be able to keep track of everything we've seen with minimum effort. I personally think delicious is a great tool and I often describe it's use in presentations and workshops. It recently went through an upgrade that improved the look and performance. However, it interestingly left out a lot of what I said was missing in my post - Yahoo MyWeb better than del.icio.us, rollyo, et.al. for Personal and Group Learning from March 16, 2006.

Develop Work Skills

Tony Karrer

There are also several studies of knowledge worker practices that suggest that a lot of what is effective is quite personal. It's always interesting to hear the perspective of someone with a background in Knowledge Management discussing these things. How can the organization capture the knowledge, learning, etc.? Sitting beside the worker is ideal - but scaling that can be a problem. This will hurt them greatly as knowledge workers going forward and hurt their organizations who will have marginal learner workers Great points.

To-learn lists

Clive on Learning

Ticking items off a list can be about as tangible an output as you get as a so-called 'knowledge worker'. The Learning Circuits Blog Big Question for September is not a question at all - it's an exploration of an idea raised by Jim Collins, in an essay in Learning Journeys. He wrote, “A true learning person also has a 'to-learn' list, and the items on that list carry at least as much weight in how one organizes his or her time as the to-do list.&# Well I've always liked lists. Lists are what stop me from worrying what it is I'm supposed to be remembering. Nonsense of course.

Quick Wins

Tony Karrer

I think Mark missed the bigger barriers of Changing Knowledge Worker Attitudes and the work literacy gap. Just saw a post by Mark Oehlert - Danger of Quick Wins. I had to post because, I think that Mark missed the mark (sorry couldn't resist). Here's the gist of his thinking: As I become more and more convinced that implementing next-gen/Web 2.0 is soooo much less about technology than about culture (Duh Mark, I know). I think the idea of 'quick wins' can be not only distracting but wasteful. And I think it's easy to underestimate that impact. answers is bad advice. Who cares?

Leading Learning and New Skills

Tony Karrer

Enabling learning is about being a learner yourself, sharing your knowledge and enthusiasm and then taking a back seat. As fields of practice and bodies of knowledge expand, a challenge for learning professionals will be to change their tool sets from prescriptive to supportive. Gina Minks: Adventures in Corporate Education What Competencies do Knowledge Workers Need? concept must be appropriate to the organisation, and this is open to question when you're looking beyond knowledge workers. We should!" Go to an ASTD conference and ask about this stuff.

Learning Professionals Leaders

Tony Karrer

world is becoming more about your network than your current knowledge. Gina Minks: Adventures in Corporate Education What Competencies do Knowledge Workers Need? On this month's Big Question - Lead the Charge - we are already seeing some interesting responses. The Learning Revolution: Where have all the leaders gone? It's difficult to not agree with everything that's in Tony's post an my short answer would be: yes they should, and the good ones already are. There's a vacuum of leadership in the adoption of enterprise/web/learning 2.0 I'm not sure I buy this. How do I use.

Learning Organizations, eLearning 2.0 and Edupunk

Tony Karrer

Most knowledge workers are used to thinking about that type of content being created for internal use only. Janet Clarey wrote an interesting blog post in response to the relatively recent edupunk meme which is basically an ideology that DIY learning and repurposing content is the way to go (and somewhat the ONLY way to go). Janet juxtaposes the recent inclusion of eLearning 2.0 type tools in Learning Management Systems against the philosophy that corporate and commercial is evil of the edupunkers. Ideologies shouldn't be rigid should they? who gives a rats ass where it lives.

Jay Changes Direction

Jay Cross

The web and knowledge were made for one another. Book (2008). Millions of knowledge workers and their bosses can prosper by adopting modern practices for working smarter and remembering things. I want to empower workers to be intuitive instructional designers as well as self-directed learners by sharing what we know. My book Aha! Reflection on Career by Decade.

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Epistemology

Clark Quinn

It came up in the Corporate Learning Trends conference last week that one person was responsible for knowledge workers who were, as she claimed, passive learners. I think that, in this time of increasing change, growing information overload, shorter half-life of knowledge, etc, that the most useful information we can provide is how to be a better learner. This is a really interesting issue, because it crosses several different areas. I have seen this as a college instructor, when students don’t want to take responsibility for their own learning.

Top 10 eLearning Predictions 2011 #LCBQ

Tony Karrer

iPad Cornerstone OnDemand Plateau Saba Augmented Reality Cloud Computing Analytics Mobile Learning GeoLearning Performance Support Outsource Low Cost iPhone Learning Theory Creative Commons Facebook Portal Learn.com Leadership eLearning Strategy Knowledge Management Voiceover Obviously, the Cornerstone OnDemand is because of the IPO. I'm hoping that others will join the effort. Video galore.

Work Literacy

Clark Quinn

It’s about identifying and developing the skills of the knowledge worker, tapping into the social network. Tony Karrer , one of our top bloggers/thinkers on elearning, pointed me to WorkLiteracy a few weeks ago, and I’m really excited about the idea, though have yet to have time to really dig in (was in Boston two weeks ago, NJ and LA last week, and several big projects right now; my apologies for the lack of posting). Naturally I’m quite excited by all this, as it taps into two of my key memes: meta-learning (or learning to learn), and 21st Century Skills.

To-Learn Lists

Clark Quinn

I think this is the case for lots of knowledge workers. Great line from Michael Hanley I would categorize myself as a "learnivore" - I continually acquire new knowledge and information through my Web-, book-, podcast-, and presentation reading, blogging (reading and writing), academic study and research, and work-based learning-related tasks. This month’s Learning Circuit’s Big Question is on: To-Learn Lists. The results this far have been really interesting to me. It appears that most of us (as is the case with me) don't keep a formal / tracked to learn list.

Conversation Learning

Clark Quinn

To me, this is a critical part of The New Skills for knowledge workers. And what I often cite as the biggest change in knowledge work skills over the past 20 years is the change in access to people. Sure, the amount of existing content out there grows exponentially (a trillion web pages indexed by Google in 2008). One of the questions being raised this week in the free, online course Work Literacy: Web 2.0 for Learning Professionals is how social networks impact personal learning. All of these kinds of questions are hard to answer with Google.