Clark Quinn

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Slow Learning – #change11

Clark Quinn

2009). Michael Allen’s eLearning Annual 2009. This is a longer post launching my week in the #change11 MOOC (Massively Open Online Course).  . Our formal learning approaches too often don’t follow how our brains really work.  We have magic now; we can summon up powerful programs to do our bidding, gaze through webcams across distances, and bring anyone and anything to pretty much anywhere. Our limitations are no longer the technology, but our imaginations. The question is, what are we, and should be, doing with this technology? like to look at this a couple of ways. Readings.

Seed, feed, & weed

Clark Quinn

In my presentation yesterday, I was talking about how to get informal learning going.  As many have noted, it’s about moving from a notion of being a builder, handcrafting (or mass-producing) solutions, to being a facilitator, nurturing the community to develop it’s own capabilities.  Jay Cross talks about the learnscape , while I term it the performance ecosystem. The point, however, is from the point of the view of the learner, all the resources needed are ‘to hand’  through every stage of knowledge work. But if you build it, they may not come. Networks take nurturing. 

Whither the library?

Clark Quinn

I go to libraries, and check out books.  I admit it, when there’s a lot I want to read, I’d rather read it on paper (at 1200 dpi) versus on the screen.  And some recent debates have got me thinking about libraries in general, public and university.  There’re some issues that are unresolved, but leave me curious. As the editor on one for-profit journal (British Journal of Education Technology), and now on one ‘open access’ (Impact: Journal of Applied Research in Workplace E-learning), I’ve been thinking more about the role of the journal, and the library. 

The ‘Least Assistance’ Principle

Clark Quinn

While I agree vehemently with most of a post by Lars Hyland, he said one thing I slightly disagree with, and I want to elaborate on it.  He was disagreeing with  “buying rapid development tools to bash out ill formed ‘e-learning’ to an audience that will not only be unimpressed but also none the wiser - or more productive&# , a point I want to nuance.  I agree with not using rapid elearning to create courses for novices, but there is a role for bashing out courses for another audience, the practitioner.  And there’s something deeper here to tease out.

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The 7 c’s of natural learning

Clark Quinn

Yesterday I talked about the seeding, feeding, and weeding necessary to develop a self-sustaining network. referred to supporting the activities that we find in natural learning, for both formal and informal learning.  Commit : we take ownership for the outcomes.  We work until we’ve gotten out of it what we need. Crash : our commitment means we make mistakes, and learn from them. Create : we design, we build, we are active in our learning. Copy : we mimic others, looking to their performances for guidance. Converse : we talk with others. Collaborate : we work together.

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Conceptualizing the Performance Ecosystem

Clark Quinn

So I’ve been playing with rethinking my Performance Ecosystem conceptualization and visualization.  The original had very discrete components, and an almost linear path, and that doesn’t quite convey the reality of how things are tied together. So here’s my current conception.  It took me a long time to create the circle with different components! 

Presenting in a networked age

Clark Quinn

The Learning Circuit’s Big Question this month has to do with the increasing prevalence of internet access during presentations.  The context is that during presentations it’s certainly possible that your audience is multi-tasking, and the question is; what are the implications?  In live presentations, the increasing prevalence of wi-fi or phone data means laptops and/or smartphones can be online, and in virtual ones there’s typically a number of other applications available at the same time. Are these activities valuable to the listener? Are they valuable to the presenter? 

McAfee Keynote at DevLearn 2009

Clark Quinn

Andy McAfee gave us a lively and informative presentation on his view of Enterprise 2.0.  BTW, Cammy Bean’s has posted a prose recitation of the talk.  With no further ado

Creating meaningful experiences

Clark Quinn

What if the learner’s experience was ‘hard fun’: challenging, but engaging, yielding a desirable experience, not just an event to be tolerated, OR what is learning experience design? Can you imagine creating a ‘course’ that wins raving fans?  It’s about designing learning that is not only effective but seriously engaging.  I believe that this is not only doable, but doable under real world constraints. There are really two components: what we need to accomplish, and what we’d like the learner to experience. And commitment. 

Top Posts of 2009

Clark Quinn

Predictions for 2009. welcome your thoughts of what made these the most interesting posts of 2009.  Seeing all the top 10 lists, I thought I’d look at what the top 10 posts were for Learnlets (using Google Analytics), and I have to say that the responses were interesting, as some weren’t the ones I thought were most interesting. suspect that they’re the ones that other people pointed to most for a variety of reasons (including me pointing people to the Broken ID series beginning). Here’s the list: The ‘Least Assistance’ Principle. Learning Twitter Chat!

Less than words

Clark Quinn

Yesterday, while I was posting on how words could be transcended by presentation, there was an ongoing twitfest on words that have become overused and, consequently, meaningless.  It started when Jane Bozarth asked what ‘instructionally sound’ meant, then Cammy Bean chimed in with ‘rich’, Steve Sorden added ‘robust’, and it went downhill from there. Other overused words mentioned include: adaptive, brain-based. game-like, comprehensive, interactive, compelling, & robust.  Similarly, clicking to move on is, apparently, interactive.  Ok, let’s play!

The Performance Environment

Clark Quinn

I’ve represented the performance ecosystem in several ways in the past, and that process continues to occur.  In the process of writing up a proposal to do some social learning strategizing for an organization, I started thinking about it from the performer perspective. However, I wasn’t creating mine so much as a conceptual framework, yet it shares characteristics with many.

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Future of the training department

Clark Quinn

Entreprise Collaborative , a cross-cultural endeavor bridging English and French to provide a jumping off point on organizational collective intelligence (and co-led by my Internet Time Alliance colleague Harold Jarche ), is launching a blog carnival.  The first topic is: the future of the training department in the Collaborative Enterprise. I’ve written before about the changes I see coming for organizations (e.g. here ), and they’re driven by the changes I am seeing in business and in society.  This doesn’t come for free.  Who is responsible for ensuring this works?

Competing conference contexts

Clark Quinn

Last week I was at the excellent-as-always DevLearn , and this week I attended the Virtual School Symposium (VSS; for the first time).  Both are about online learning, but the former is in the corporate world, and the latter is in the K12 world.  There are a lot of differences! There are similarities, for example both are great conferences.  Both are experiencing growth, offer good lineups of presentations, have appropriate exhibitions, good food, and socializing. Both also have a passionate attendee base, as you would expect from the growth. mobile) and approaches (e.g.

Driving formal & informal from the same place

Clark Quinn

There’s been such a division between formal and informal; the fight for resources, mindspace, and the ability for people to get their mind around making informal concrete.  However, I’ve been preparing a presentation from another way of looking at it, and I want to suggest that, at core, both are being driven from the same point: how humans learn. I was looking at the history of society, and it’s getting more and more complex. Organizationally, we started from a village, to a city, and started getting hierarchical.  In both cases, the learning is facilitated.

Monday Broken ID Series: The Introduction

Clark Quinn

First Post in the Series. This is one in a series of thoughts on some broken areas of ID that I’m posting for Mondays.  The intention is to provide insight into many ways much of instructional design fails, and some pointers to avoid the problems. The point is not to say ‘bad designer’, but instead to point out how to do better design. One of the first things learners see is the introduction to the content; it’s the first place that they can be disappointed, and all too often they are.  Which is a wonderful way to start a learning experience, eh? What we want to do is bring in the emotion! 

(New) Monday Broken ID Series: Objectives

Clark Quinn

This is the first in a series of posts on some broken areas of ID that I will be posting on Mondays.  The intention is to provide insight into many ways much of instructional design fails, and some pointers to avoid the problems. The point is not to say ‘bad designer’, but instead to point out how to do better design. The way I’ve seen many learning solutions go awry is right at the beginning, focusing on the wrong objective.  Too often the objective is focused on rote knowledge, whether it’s facts, procedures, or canned statements.  That’s why we use external aids like calendars. 

Predictions for 2009

Clark Quinn

Over at eLearn Magazine , Lisa Neal Gualtieri gets elearning predictions for 2009, and they’re reliably interesting. Here’re mine: The ordinary: Mobile will emerge, not as a major upheaval, but quietly infiltrating our learning experiences. We’ll see more use of games (er, Immersive Learning Simulations) as a powerful learning opportunity, and tools to make it easier to develop. Social networking will become the ‘go to’ option to drive performance improvements. continue to see interest in games, and naturally I’m excited.  welcome your thoughts.

Happy Holidays!

Clark Quinn

Wishing you and yours the best for the new year

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Engaging Learning

Clark Quinn

How do you systematically design learning experiences that effectively engage the learner? This was the question I set out to address more than 5 years ago.  Based upon years of deep investigation into learning & instruction theories and design processes, and practical experience in designing games, I wrote Engaging Learning: Designing e-Learning Simulation Games.

Extremophiles & Organizational Agility

Clark Quinn

A number of years ago, I co-wrote a chapter with Eileen Clegg called The Agility Factor , that appeared in Marcia Conner & James Clawson’s excellent collection of organizational culture articles in the book Creating a Learning Culture. The focus of the book was on empowering organizations to be nimble in a context of increasing change. are known as extremophiles. 

The Future of Organizational Learning event

Clark Quinn

At the upcoming DevLearn conference, Jay Cross and I are holding a pre-conference workshop titled: Be the Future of Organizational Learning: Become a Chief Meta-Learning Officer. We already know we’ve got critical mass in terms of signups, so we’re excited about the possibilities, but we really want to do our best to ensure we  deliver a valuable experience.

Virtual World Affordances, updated

Clark Quinn

Corrie Bergeron (@skydadddy) pointed out that I hadn’t really accounted for the ability to create a persona, a representation of yourself via avatar that reflects how you’d like to be perceived.  Of course, you’ll have a persona regardless, if you’re present in the world, but the ability to customize one is the unique opportunity. Thoughts and comments always welcome

Extending Virtual World Affordances

Clark Quinn

I recently attended the 3DTLC conference, as I reported before.  Chuck Hamilton presented on his (IBM’s) take on affordances on virtual worlds. start with what I think are the core affordances of virtual worlds, that there’s a 3D world, that you can visit, and that’s digital.  through the internet). Feedback solicited!

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Learning Experience Creation Systems

Clark Quinn

Where do the problems lie in getting good learning experiences? There’s been a intriguing debate over at Aaron (@mrch0mp3rs) Silver’s blog about where the responsibility lies between clients and vendors for knowledge to ensure a productive relationship.  One of the issues raised (who, me?) is understanding design, but it’s clearly more than that, and the debate has raged.

elearning, strategically

Clark Quinn

While I’ve lots more to say, I put a short version of my vision of elearning strategy in Michael Allen’s 2009 e-Learning Annual.  It’s about both getting the individual elements right, and establishing the connections between the elements to achieve synergy, not irrelevance (or worse). You can download the article (PDF).  I’d welcome your thoughts and feedback.

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On the road again

Clark Quinn

I like going to conferences: exchanging ideas, meeting new people, and just variety.  However, I haven’t been on the road since early June for any conferences , after running a workshop at ASTD’s international conference and then presenting at DAU/GMU’s Innovations in eLearning Conference.  But it’s that time again. Others come close, but they really strike the best balance.

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Monday Broken ID Series: Seriation

Clark Quinn

Previous Series Post. This is one in a series of thoughts on some broken areas of ID that I’ve been posting for Mondays.  The intention is to provide insight into many ways much of instructional design fails, and some pointers to avoid the problems. The point is not to say ‘bad designer’, but instead to point out how to do better design. And more. Show Me, Let Me).

Workplace Learning in 10 years?

Clark Quinn

This month’s Learning Circuit’s blog Big Question is “What will workplace learning look like in 10 years&#.  Triggered by Jay & Harold’s post and reactions (and ignoring my two related posts on Revisiting and Learning Design ), it’s asking what the training department might look like in 10 years.  I certainly  have my desired answer.

Designing Learning

Clark Quinn

However, real instructional design theory (particularly when it’s cognitive-, social-, and constructivist-aware) is great stuff (e.g. Merrill, Reigeluth, Keller, et al); it’s just that most of it’s been neutered in interpretation.  The point being, really understanding how people learn is critical.  However, it’s not enough.  There’s also understanding information design. 

Strategy, strategically

Clark Quinn

In addition to working on the technology plan for my school district, I’ve also been assisting a not-for-profit trying to get strategic about technology.  The struggles are instructive, but looking across these two separate instances as well as the previous organizations I’ve assisted, I’m realizing that there are some common barriers. The obvious one is time. Yet, we must.

Jumpstarting

Clark Quinn

I’m on the Board of Directors for an educational not-for-profit that has had almost 30 years of successful work with programs in classrooms, nationally and internationally.  However, 5 years ago or so when I joined, they were doing almost nothing with technology.  It’s been a slow road. Persistence pays off, even in the most hidebound environments.  Jumper cables, anyone?

Tools and tradeoffs

Clark Quinn

Old Site. I’ve been busy updating my website.  RapidWeaver uses templates: there are quite a few included, and you can pay for more.  I wasn’t completely happy with any, but by systematic exploration (aka messing around), I managed to make one I was happy with. New Site. The more general lesson is that there are no right answers, only tradeoffs. 

The Quiver & The Gun

Clark Quinn

(No, I’m not talking about weapons, or anthropological determination, sorry :). Organizations have to be nimble; the environment we face is more like sitting in the ocean waiting to ride the ever-changing waves than it is striding down a concrete road.  Increasingly, in these chaotic times, changes are unpredictable.  There are changing tides, swells, weather, and the resulting waves. 

The big blindspot

Clark Quinn

I was talking with a colleague over lunch the other day about her company, platform, and organizational learning issues.  And something occurred to me: we’re trying to merge onto a freeway right at a blindspot. In orgs, there’s a real tendency to bucket any discussion of learning into ‘training’, and dismiss it.  And don’t get me wrong, I don’t think training has to be irrelevant (though in practice much of it is). Except that, too, has a real easy knee-jerk rejection.  The problem, then, is where do you come in?  That’s a big blindspot. 

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Foundations

Clark Quinn

I love talking with my Internet Time Alliance colleagues, they’re always sparking me to new thoughts.  In our chat, we were talking about learning, and I riffed off Charles’ comment about defining learning to opine that I see learning as a persistent behavior change (in the same context).  It’s very behaviorist-influenced (given that I’m a cognitive/connectionist/constructivist type), but the point is that it needs to manifest.  However, it got me to thinking about individual versus group behavior.  that innovation isn’t solitary.

Microcourses?

Clark Quinn

In the conversation with Kris Rockwell of Hybrid Learning I mentioned previously , we talked about the definition of mobile learning.  We both agreed that it wasn’t about loading your average asynchronous elearning course onto the phone, and that it was more about performance support.  Brevity is the soul of mobile, as well as wit.  And I also am happy to think of mobile as an augment to formal learning: reactivating knowledge, distributing practice, contextualizing learning, and even performance capture.  But then we came to the ‘grey’ area of so-called microcourses.

Content Models and Mobile Delivery

Clark Quinn

On Friday, I had the pleasure of a conversation of Kris Rockwell , CEO of Hybrid Learning for my in-process mobile learning book. I’d sought him out because of how he was developing mobile.  Using content models to separate out the content from how it gets rendered for display, he’s creating more flexibility across devices. This combines two of my passions, and is part of a performance ecosystem strategy. Hybrid uses DITA , a standard for wrapping definition around content, to develop their content.  He presented powerful arguments to use this open source topic-based approach. 

Virtual Worlds Value Proposition

Clark Quinn

In prepping for tomorrow nights #lrnchat, Marcia Conner was asking about the value proposition of virtual worlds. ripped out a screed and lobbed it, but thought I’d share it here as well: At core, I believe the essential affordances of the virtual world are 3D/spatial, and social. There are lower-overhead social environments (but…which I’ll get back to). However, many of our more challenging tasks are 3D visualization (e.g. work of Liz Tancred in medicine, Hollan & Hutchins on steamships). Now you still might not need a social one, so let’s get back to that.

The Great eLearning Garbage Vortex

Clark Quinn

Norbert Hockenberry here, reporting on a giant floating patch of elearning that has recently been discovered. Like the Great Pacific Garbage Patch , this has been created by discarded material being gathered by oceanic currents into a giant mess. Unlike the Pacific patch, this isn’t an environmental disaster so much as a economic and social catastrophe. The waste of organizational resources, and learner time, is tragic. Seldom has so much been done, for so many, for so little gain. What is the cause of this mess? Two main things: bad design, and mismanagement. Bad Design. Mismanagement.

Blurring boundaries

Clark Quinn

I just downloaded a couple of new apps onto my iPhone. Okay, so one was a free trial of a game, but the other was a really interesting offering, and it led to some thoughts about organizational silos and new functionality. The app was a new release by ATT called Mark the Spot , that lets you report the occurrence and location of a problem with your coverage.  This is a new way to interact with customers, allowing them to serve as a agent of “can you hear me now&# -style coverage evaluation.  And it’s mobile. So here’s the question I pondered: is this tech support?  Marketing? 

The Augmented Performer

Clark Quinn

The post I did yesterday on Distributed Cognition also triggered another thought, about the augmented learner.  The cited post talked about how design doesn’t recognize the augmented performer, and this is a point I’ve made elsewhere, but I wanted to capture it in a richer representation.  From the point of the view of a problem we’re trying to solve, we’re not as effective as we could be. GPS, compass), as well as access to a ridiculously huge amount of potential information through the internet, as well as our colleagues. 

Distributed Thinking & Learning

Clark Quinn

A post I was pointed to reviews a chapter distributed thinking, a topic I like from my days getting to work with Ed Hutchins and his work on Distributed Cognition.  It’s a topic I spoke about at DevLearn , and recently wrote about.  The chapter is by David Perkins, one of premier thinkers on thinking, and I like several things he says. And that, at the end of the day, is what we need to be doing.  So, start thinking a bit broader, and deeper, about learning and the components thereof, and produce better learning, learners, and ultimately the outcome performance.

Who authorizes the authority?

Clark Quinn

As a reaction to my eLearnMag editorial on the changing nature of the educational publishing market, Publish or Perish , a colleague said: “There is a tremendous opportunity in the higher ed publishing market for a company that understands what it means to design and deliver engaging, valuable, and authentic customer experiences–from content to services to customer service and training.&#. agree, but it triggered a further thought. And if so, what are the certification processes? Currently, institutions are accredited by accrediting bodies.  AACSB or ACBSP for business[2?], WASC ).  

Internet Time Alliance Podcast

Clark Quinn

Earlier this month, Charles Jennings , Harold Jarche , Jay Cross and I got together, virtually, to represent the Internet Time Alliance for a discussion around organizations and social media with Xyleme Learning.  Dawn Polous elegantly and eloquently hosted us, providing the starting questions and segueing between the comments. They’ve gathered them up in a series of podcasts , and if you’re curious about what we’re up to, I recommend you go have a listen.

2009 Top Posts and Topics: Kapp Notes

Kapp Notes

The ASTD Big question this month is an annual question: What did you learn about learning in 2009? So one of the tasks I will do to answer this question is to see what posts were the Best of 2009 from several different sources. How Long Does It Take to Develop One Hour of E-Learning-Updated for 2009. I had done some work in this area in 2003 and wanted to see if any information had changed. Here are my top posts via Google Analytics for 2009.(I'll So there are my most popular posts for 2009. First from eLearning Learning , Here are my top posts. Random Web 2.0