Clive on Learning

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Compelling content requires some media chemistry

Clive on Learning

Media chemists know less is usually more Media consumers, especially learners, want the easy life. They're interested in the content, not the container. The technology and the interface with which they interact should be invisible. Your design decisions should be invisible. And all that requires a little media chemistry. There is a limited range of elements which make up all media formats.

How online education could mean a very few attain stardom

Clive on Learning

It brought to mind a posting I made back in 2009, called How online media helps to create ever brighter stars. thought I''d bring it back to life here: September 22, 2009 Webinars, video recordings and podcasts provide the opportunity for experts to share their thoughts and experiences with a wide audience. I was fascinated to read an article in this week''s Economist on Massive Open Online Forces , looking at some of the economic effects of the rise of online education. In particular the following caught my eye: The market for instructors will also be transformed. Why live?

Profile of a learning architect: Julie Wedgwood

Clive on Learning

The successful adoption of e-learning as an accepted method of delivering training proved to be vital during the swine flu epidemic in 2009. Throughout my book The New Learning Architect I take time out to look at real-life examples of great learning architects in action. This shared service had been formed by bringing together the IT departments from three major NHS trusts.

Clips and tips are what you want when you're on the move

Clive on Learning

Back in November 2009, I posted about Yet another renaissance for the training video and marvelled at how Video Arts has been able to re-invent itself as each new opportunity presents itself.Well here we go again. I've been taking a look at the first iPhone app from long-standing training film specialist, London-based Video Arts. The app is available for iPhone, iPad and Blackberry.

Ten commandments of e-learning (content design)

Clive on Learning

Cath Ellis recently set out her ten commandments of e-learning and this prompted me to try and articulate my own. Now e-learning's a big subject if you include all its many variants - formal and informal, synchronous and asynchronous and so on - and if you take into account all the issues relating to its management and marketing. So, what I've done is restrict my thoughts to the design of interactive, e-learning content, drawing heavily from the 60-minute masters : Structure into modules. Keep each module to one main idea. That's enough for most learners to cope with in one session.

Shepherd accused of sensationalist claptrap

Clive on Learning

As a result, I came to the conclusion in 2009 that blogging is journalism , pure and simple. Jay Cross , someone who I respect immensely professionally and like as a person, has accused me, with some justification, of 'sensationalist claptrap'. At a time when, in the UK, we are in the middle of the Leveson enquiry , which is looking at the 'culture, practice and ethics of the press', Jay's comment hit home. No-one has been more angry than me as, every day, more evidence is revealed of the disgraceful practices of the UK tabloids, yet perhaps, in my own small way, I am as guilty as any.

Want a cushy little number? Why not be a training specialist?

Clive on Learning

Money (US figures): Median annual earnings were $52,120 in 2009. According to US News , Training Specialist (note the old-fashioned but nevertheless still largely accurate job title) is one of the to best careers for 2011, at least in the US. That's good news for all of you out there who fell foul of the recession. Here are some other interesting snippets from the article: Prospects (US figures): Employment is expected to jump by 50,500 jobs, or more than 23 per cent, to 267,000 jobs by 2018, the Labor Department reports. Activity level: Average. Stress level: Pretty low.

Five media forms

Clive on Learning

Last week I posted on Exploring e-learning in all its forms , which Mark Bethelemy elaborated on in his post From formal courses to social learning. The following table is my attempt at allocating technologies to each of the five categories. added a column to explain whether e-content would be an input to the activities involved or an output.

E-Learning Debate 2009

Clive on Learning

Today saw a tremendous gathering of the who's who of UK learning technologies in the historic debating chamber of the Oxford Union. Many thanks must go to e-learning developers Epic for putting together this event and allowing their own industry to be placed under the microscope. The motion was as follows: "This house believes that the e-learning of today is essential for the important skills of tomorrow." " Needless to say this wording is open to all sorts of interpretations. There were eight speakers, so excuse the fact that my notes are sketchy: For: Prof. serious gaming, etc.

The case against multi-tasking is building

Clive on Learning

An article, The Myth of Multitasking , in this month’s Management Today magazine, adds to the backlash against the frenetic task switching that has become so common in the past few years, as more and more communication channels open up alongside new mobile technologies. See my posts A challenge to the multitasking assumption and The Big Question: How should presenters address multitasking? The article collects some fascinating opinions and data. Here are a few quotes to whet your appetite: "Multi-tasking might look impressive, but it's often just a muddle-headed displacement activity."

Design elements - a graphics style manual

Clive on Learning

I love crossing into related disciplines and exploring the received wisdom. I'm obviously not a professional graphic designer but I am an enthusiastic amateur and keen to improve. With this in mind I enjoyed exploring Timothy Samara's sumptuous Design elements - a graphic style manual. This book has two appeals: firstly, it lays out clearly and simply a number of basic rules; secondly, it overflows with breathtaking examples that just cry out to be stolen. In this posting I can't make available any of the examples to you - for those you'll have to buy the book; but I can share the rules.

How to do better creative work

Clive on Learning

One of the most inspiring books I've read this year has been How to do better creative work by Steve Harrison (Pearson, 2009), which I saw in the window of a specialist art book shop in Brick Lane, London. Steve spent 15 years as a creative director for top ad agencies and his book is aimed at primarily at those doing similar jobs, but I found his ideas rang very loud bells in relation to e-learning development. Those who never really knew what they were doing get found out - for, as the saying goes, when the tide goes out you get to know who has been swimming naked."

Adobe eLearning Suite: is it worth it?

Clive on Learning

In an anonymous reply to my posting yesterday on the pirating of PC software, an elearning developer asked "How do real people actually afford/justify purchasing something like the Adobe eLearning Suite?" " He'd tried open source and free software but had to admit that, as far as e-learning development software was concerned, "Adobe is still king and will remain so for our foreseeable future." But Adobe made its name primarily through the sale of professional tools to design professionals, and these products still form the basis of the Adobe catalogue.

The Big Question: Predictions for 2009

Clive on Learning

The Learning Circuits Blog Big Question for January asks what are your challenges, plans and predictions for 2009? Here are my offerings: Challenges Keeping innovation and change on the agenda when all anyone's interested in is survival. Keeping the income flowing in when spending on external contractors could take a hit. When there are days left over you do your own thing.

The Big Question: How do I communicate the value of social media as a learning tool to my organisation?

Clive on Learning

This month’s Big Question in the ASTD Learning Circuits Blog is ‘How do I communicate the value of social media as a learning tool to my organisation?’ How indeed? Well one way to approach this issue is to step back from the technology and ask yourself whether bottom-up learning in general (which has always happened, but which social media facilitates) is appropriate for the target population?

Live online learning – a free download

Clive on Learning

Onlignment has just issued this free download e-book, a facilitator’s guide to live online learning. Download it here.

What we need is a little more slide:ology

Clive on Learning

I’ve just finished slide:ology , a wonderful book by Nancy Duarte, which celebrates ‘the art and science of creating great presentations’. Nancy is well qualified to show us how PowerPoint and similar packages can be used to greatest effect, as Duarte Design was the firm that created Al Gore’s Oscar-winning film, An Inconvenient Truth. The book is full of great examples and tips.

Open source instructional design

Clive on Learning

The book I chose was, to be fair, a short one, the intriguingly titled Open Source Instructional Design by Nathan Eckel (IntelliDesign, 2009). The flight from London to Newcastle this afternoon provided an ideal opportunity to remove one book from the pile accumulating on my desk. Not only did I accomplish this, I still had time for an exorbitantly expensive cup of tea and a KitKat. This process is time consuming and adversarial. must admit that my usual experience is not the one described in point 1 above. Then I’d produce a design, which the subject expert would approve.

The Big Question: What did you learn about learning in 2009?

Clive on Learning

Quite a lot actually. Or have we?

Compliance or competence in Berlin

Clive on Learning

Next week I am off to Online Educa 2009 in Berlin. will be taking part in three sessions: Thursday at 11.45: Delivering more for less in business Thursday at 16.30: Compliance training – the kiss of death for corporate e-learning? Friday at 14.15: The battle of the bloggers In case you miss my presentation on compliance training or as preparation if you are thinking of attending, here’s a SlideShare version of my slides with a built-in script: Competency or compliance - you choose View more presentations from Clive Shepherd. If you’re at the show, do say hello

Homo Competens – learning, doing, sharing

Clive on Learning

Recently Bert sent me a copy of his intriguingly titled Homo Competens (Beta Book, 2009), an exploration of competence and how humans acquire this. I met Bert de Coutere at Online Educa in December. He chaired the Battle of the Bloggers in which I participated. only got so far as page 31, when I encountered the following analysis by Bert of the stages in the building of competence: Learning If you are mainly learning, you are an apprentice. You are building knowledge, skills and behaviours. Doing If you are mainly doing, you are a practitioner. You are building experience.

Games lessons

Clive on Learning

This week's Economist carried an interesting article about the use of video games at school. The article, Games Lessons , describes how Katie Salen, a games designer and professor of design and technology at Parsons The New School for Design, in New York, has taken the initiative in setting up Quest to Learn , "a new, taxpayer-funded school which is about to open its doors to pupils who will never suffer the indignity of snoring through double French but will, rather, spend their entire days playing games." It will be extremely interesting to see how they get on.

Brain rules #1

Clive on Learning

John Medina's excellent book Brain Rules has received quite a bit of attention already (see my original post based on the videos and online information I explored first on John's website , as well as Donald Clark's recent review ), but I've only just got round to reading it properly and I want to take a look at each of the twelve rules in a bit more detail. Whether I sustain this remains to be seen. John is a developmental molecular biologist (whatever that means) and serious about distinguishing brain myths from brain facts, so I've got some confidence in his work.

Battle of the Bloggers – last words – part 4

Clive on Learning

I continue my re-cap of the responses I gave to the questions posed at last week’s Battle of the Bloggers at Online Educa 2009 : Question 4 is: What are the learning tools of the future? What do we need more of? Tools are great, not just as toys, but because they change the world. Keep them flowing.

Battle of the Bloggers – last words – part 3

Clive on Learning

I continue my re-cap of the responses I gave to the questions posed at last week’s Battle of the Bloggers at Online Educa 2009 : Question 3 is: Is there a common language in the learning field? What can we agree on? My response: Sometimes I wish there was a little more agreement on some key learning terms. Is it about content or about collaboration? Language is constantly evolving.

Battle of the Bloggers – last words – part 6

Clive on Learning

This posting completes my re-cap of the responses I gave to the questions posed at last week’s Battle of the Bloggers at Online Educa 2009 : Question 6 is: With the 20th anniversary of the collapse of the Berlin wall, what walls would you most like to see broken down in learning? But the walls that matter most in learning are in the minds of learners, not l&d professionals.

Battle of the Bloggers – last words – part 5

Clive on Learning

I continue my re-cap of the responses I gave to the questions posed at last week’s Battle of the Bloggers at Online Educa 2009 : Question 5 is: What type of learning has the most impact? Instructionally sound or contextually relevant? My response: This is a difficult one to unpick because these are not mutually exclusive concepts. Experiential learning is always contextually relevant.

Battle of the Bloggers – last words – part 1

Clive on Learning

Last Friday I took part in the Battle of the Bloggers at Online Educa 2009 in Berlin, alongside Donald Clark , Jane Hart and Ellen Wagner. Our host was the inimitable Bert de Coutere (pic of half of Bert below, the other half is similar), who came up with some strange but intriguing questions. For the benefit of those unable to attend the session (i.e. Well, that’s unlikely.

Battle of the Bloggers – last words – part 1

Clive on Learning

Last Friday I took part in the Battle of the Bloggers at Online Educa 2009 in Berlin, alongside Donald Clark , Jane Hart and Ellen Wagner. Our host was the inimitable Bert de Coutere (pic of half of Bert below, the other half is similar), who came up with some strange but intriguing questions. For the benefit of those unable to attend the session (i.e. Well, that’s unlikely.

Clive’s columns vol2

Clive on Learning

I’ve assembled another collection of my columns, this time from e.learning age and IT Training magazines and written over the past two years.

CreateDebate does what it says on the tin

Clive on Learning

picked a contentious issue – how relevant is the ADDIE model in 2009? – and then invited some colleagues that I thought would have an opinion on the subject to join the discussion. Earlier this week I tested out a site called CreateDebate. which allows you to set out a proposition and some opposing arguments and then invite others to join the debate.

Visual language for designers

Clive on Learning

I've spent a couple of happy hours poring over Connie Malamed 's luxuriant new tome Visual language for designers , (Rockport, 2009). Like slide:ology , which I reviewed last month, this book is a work of art in its own right - a real visual extravaganza. It might also explain how Connie also became involved in e-learning. And graphic designers sometimes need to be reminded of that fact

An Xmas puzzle

Clive on Learning

That’s it for Clive on Learning before Xmas 09. Far too much to do with loads of family coming to stay and then party for neighbours on Tuesday. I’ll leave you with this puzzle. Can you work out what you’re seeing in this Xmas picture? If you’re the first to reply with the correct answer, I’ll send you a free e-book. Happy holidays to all my readers

Why it pays to be the only one with your name

Clive on Learning

I would have thought Clive Shepherd was a fairly distinctive name. Very few people born in England and its former colonies (Clive James – Australia, Clive Lloyd – West Indies), now all middle-aged because the fashion for the name was short-lived, are unfortunate enough to have been named after Major General Robert Clive, also known as Clive of India (1725-1774). He was bald and middle-aged.

It takes years to perfect this type of timing

Clive on Learning

Thanks to Jeroen van Eeghem for this picture, which captures the moment at Learning Technologies 2009 when Jay Cross (right) strolled past as I delivered my presentation on the exhibition floor, just as his picture appeared on the slide. I'm not a fatalist, but what are the chances of that?

Exploring e-learning in all its forms

Clive on Learning

The Big Question: How should presenters address multitasking?

Clive on Learning

I’m just in time to tackle this month’s Big Question from the Learning Circuits Blog. The question was prompted to some extent by my post Multitasking is now every presenter’s problem , in which I put forward the notion that it wasn’t just webinar presenters who had to deal with their audience multitasking, this was now rife at face-to-face events as well. Life’s too short

Wisdomap

Clive on Learning

I recently had the opportunity for a hands-on demonstration of some new mind-mapping software called Wisdomap , aimed specifically at the education market. Although the initial focus has been teachers in the 16-18 age group, this is a piece of software that could easily cross over into education generally and into workplace learning. This is definitely worth trying as a PowerPoint alternative.

VLE 2

Old and new models of teaching

Clive on Learning

Phil Green alerted me to this amusing image which originates from a JISC InfoNET article Approaches to course design with technology. Of course it isn’t that amusing because it’s really rather sad. I don’t blame the sponsors and others who commission learning interventions for this state of affairs, because they don’t know any better.

Mobile broadband the route to universal access

Clive on Learning

According to Finishing the Job in this week's Economist, mobile phone access will soon be universal and the next job will to do the same for the internet: " at current rates of growth it seems likely that within five years, and certainly within ten, everyone in the world who wants a mobile phone will probably have one. The next priority is to ensure universal internet access. Quite a prospec

Blog-o-the-month: your vote counts

Clive on Learning

Seems Clive on Learning has been nominated for Blog-o-the-Month at the Blogger's Hut on Second Life at ISTE Island. If you believe we should win, head off to the Blogger’s Hut yourself and ‘click the appropriate square on the polling object

New thoughts on getting started in e-learning

Clive on Learning

As you can see, I'm really having to rough it at the ITU Regional Human Capacity Development Forum for Africa here in Kampala. However, this abundance is not representative of the situations many of the delegates here are facing when trying to implement e-learning. It follows that we've been having a lot of discussions about where to start and how to get quick results.

Riding the change curve

Clive on Learning

Yesterday I was presenting at an organisation's internal HR conference. gave the same presentation I've been doing all year, on the theme of 'change and opportunity'. explain the enormous pressures for change currently facing learning and development, and the opportunities we have at our disposal to respond to these changes using new media. How many would still be in denial? But wait a minute.

Big Question: What new skills and knowledge are required for learning professionals?

Clive on Learning

This month's Big Question on the Learning Circuits Blog asks 'What new skills and knowledge are required for learning professionals?' Well,contrary to many commentators, I am not so sure that l&d professionals need to tear up the rule book and start again. Let's take an example. Big mistake. Now they have a hell of a lot of catching up to do. can't imagine who will want to employ them.

CommentCatcher

Clive on Learning

I’ve been having a play with this little tool from i3Logic. It acts as an Articulate plug-in, allowing customers, reviewers and subject-experts to make comments on Articulate projects that are in development or early stages of implementation. The comments are stored in a simple database on the server of your choice.

2009 Top Posts and Topics: Kapp Notes

Kapp Notes

The ASTD Big question this month is an annual question: What did you learn about learning in 2009? So one of the tasks I will do to answer this question is to see what posts were the Best of 2009 from several different sources. How Long Does It Take to Develop One Hour of E-Learning-Updated for 2009. I had done some work in this area in 2003 and wanted to see if any information had changed. Here are my top posts via Google Analytics for 2009.(I'll So there are my most popular posts for 2009. First from eLearning Learning , Here are my top posts. Random Web 2.0