Jay Cross's Informal Learning

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How to support informal learning

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

There’s so much to learn: more information was produced in 2009 than in all previous human history. Interview. by Robert Morris, Dallas Business Commentary Examiner. Cross is a champion of informal learning, Web 2.0, and systems thinking. His calling is to help business people improve their performance on the job and satisfaction in life. They are currently refining informal/web 2.0

Allen Tough, informal learning pioneer

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

Allen Tough,  a brief talk at the 3rd New Approaches to Lifelong Learning (NALL) Conference. Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. February 19, 1999. They’re not aware of other people’s learning, educators don’t take it into account and so on. It seems to happen in all demographic groups. We found a 20/80% split. And the other 80% was informal.

Agile instructional design

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

I’ve been thinking about fresh approaches to instructional design. Instructional design was invented around the time of World War II. Starting virtually from scratch, America had to train millions of men to be soldiers and millions of civilians to make ships and armaments. The training film was born, soon to be followed with the ADDIE model. Training is generally imposed on people.

Favorite 2009 posts on Informal Learning Blog

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

Here are the most popular posts on the Informal Learning Blog in 2009. Business Impact of Social and Informal Learning. T o implement social/informal learning infrastructure projects, learning and development professionals need to shift their focus from learning to earning. The place to begin is by identifying a business objective that is vital to a corporate sponsor. They needn’t worry.

New skills for learning professionals

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

Last month I opened the IADIS eLearning 2009 Conference in Portugal with an address on Redefining Instructional Design. We addressed this question at the April 2009 Learntrends event. This month’s big question asks, “In a Learning 2.0 Here is how I described some of the roles learning professionals will need to fill in our brave new world: This is not entirely original. We

Who don’t we want to work smarter?

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

Next month I’ll be conducting several onsite workshops to inject informal/social learning practices into hidebound organizations that are anxious to ramp up to the future. My intent is to challenge a couple of dozen managers to each come up with a major change project and shape up a pitch to sell the idea to their organization. intend to coax them to plant dozens of seeds. Employees. Exactly.

Jay’s new book on learning metrics

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

New book: What Would Andrew Do? by Jay Cross & friends. How to sell senior management on the value of learning. Preview and Table of Contents. 189 pages, $19.99 hard copy or download , $14.99 read-only. Blurb : Chief Learning Officers and training directors are struggling to convince executives they are making a difference. To be successful, they must think and act like business people. works.

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togetherLearn is online

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

Those of you who follow Jane Hart, Harold Jarche, Clark Quinn, or me may want to visit our new site ; it’s only a few hours old. Our premise, in its most abbreviated form, is that four heads are better than one. If you’ve got a really thorny, vital, complex, organization-wide learning problem to solve, get in touch.

New roles for former trainers

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

Get Out of the Training Business , my last column for Chief Learning Officer, called for the abolition of  corporate training departments. Help me write the next installment. Some instructors and instructional designers now see me as a job threat. They needn’t worry. Enlightened eLearning requires more people, not fewer. You can, however, change their roles.

Jay Cross's Informal Learning - Untitled Article

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

Here are the top sites from Informal Learning Flow for September 2009. The Awesomeness Manifesto - HarvardBusiness.org , September 16, 2009. An Operating System for the Mind - Half an Hour , September 19, 2009. RSS never blocks you or goes down: why social networks need to be decentralized - OReilly Radar , September 14, 2009. Rapid Prototyping Tools Revisited - Adaptive Path , September 16, 2009. Full Circle , September 8, 2009. Scoring with Social Media: 6 Tips for Using Analytics - HarvardBusiness.org , September 21, 2009. Featured Sources.

Social Contagion

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

Is Happiness Catching? By CLIVE THOMPSON. New York Times magazine. SOCIAL NETWORKS AND HAPPINESS. By Nicholas A. Christakis & James H. Fowler. Edge, The Third Culture. You’re going to be hearing a lot about social contagion in the coming months, for it’s a great topic for people who are interested in how social networks function. Researchers Nicholas A. Christakis & James H. Fowler say: We found that social networks have clusters of happy and unhappy people within them that reach out to three degrees of separation. Colleagues at work, not so much.

Future of the learning business

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

What’s the future of the learning business? Are content providers going the way of print newspapers? Are LMS vendors headed down the trail blazed by record stores? Tony Karrer is orchestrating our next free LearnTrends event on these very questions. Join us July 23,  9 AM – 1 PM Pacific Time / 4 PM – 8 PM GMT. We’ll hear from CLOs, training company CEOs, analysts, and software vendors. Then several of us will try to wrap our arms around some conclusions. For background, read Tony’s great post on the Business of Learning. Don’t miss the comments.

First, kill all the instructors

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

Just fooling. wish we had more instructors. In these explosive times, I’d like to see more of all forms of learning. If we don’t pump more resources into learning, we’re going to be flying blind. This morning I received an email asking… How are people using social software to support learning? think most of us agree that there is an important social dimension to learning. Am I missing something? I do find Wikipedia to be a powerful learning tool, one that I access almost everyday and for which I write at least two or three articles a year.

A new model for training

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

This is an excerpt from The training department of the future by Harold Jarche and Jay Cross. See the full article at the togetherLearn site. A New Model for Training. Workers at the the bottom of the traditional organizational pyramid are those who interact closest with their environment (market, customers, information). To be effective today they need to be constantly probing and trying out better ways of work. Management’s job is to assist this dynamic flow of sense-making and to respond to workers’ needs, within a trusted network of information and knowledge sharing.

Informal Learning Flow

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

Professional learning is increasingly driven by demand, not supply. You decide what you need or want to learn and you go get it when you feel like it. Since you chose your topic rather than being told, you’re more likely to retain information you find. To keep from drowning in the gusher of discoveries, news, and insight on the net, astute foragers use services to filter the noise and present headlines worthy of further investigation. Keeping one’s finger on the pulse professionally is a tougher nut to crack. follow people on blogs, Twitter and Friendfeed. Until today. Return ).

Ten years after

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

The Information Era has arrived. The Machine Age is over. The rules have changed. The sky has fallen in. Human resources are more important than natural resources, brains more important than brawn. Networks are connecting everyone and everything. Clocks run faster. In this topsy-turvy world, few things are predictable. %&#* happens. Straight-line projections are almost certainly wrong. Absent a long-term perspective, we make decisions on the fly. We trade speed for quality. Most damaging of all, we respond to tomorrow’s questions with yesterday’s answers. Not just in class. Always. You bet.

Anatomy of an unworkshop

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

think I’ll shoot for a dozen unworkshops in 2009. An unworkshop is composed of small pieces, loosely joined. always reserve the right to hop around based on my reading of the participants. Every unworkshop is unique unto itself.) Sometimes I get so worked up that I feel that I am channeling the material rather than presenting it. That’s the “un&# part. overview.

Anatomy of an unworkshop

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

think I’ll shoot for a dozen unworkshops in 2009. An unworkshop is composed of small pieces, loosely joined. always reserve the right to hop around based on my reading of the participants. Every unworkshop is unique unto itself.) Sometimes I get so worked up that I feel that I am channeling the material rather than presenting it. That’s the “un&# part. overview.

lrnchat

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

July 24, 2009 by Marcia Conner. Welcome. lrnchat is an online chat that happens every Thursday night 8:30-10pm EST / 5:30-7pm PST over the social messaging service Twitter. Participants are people interested in the topic of learning from one another and who want to discuss how to help other people learn. Sounds crazy, eh? Ideas fly by fast and furious.

Narrate your work

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

When you share your discoveries of how to do something, you enable others to follow in your footsteps. At Online Educa we simulcast and recorded workshop sessions with both remote and F2F presenters. This is trickier than you might think. Heike Philp, who figured things out, mastered the technology, and managed the sessions, has left us these breadcrumbs on how to do it. Thanks, Heike.

Play within a play

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

Snapshot of Tweeps in #lrnchat simultaneously dancing in Second Life.

What will change in 2010?

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

I nnovations in computing used to trickle down from business and government to consumers. Mainframes evolved into personal computers. The space program put men on the moon and gave us Tang for breakfast. Now, innovation often goes the other way. Things start with consumers and are later adopted by corporations. Take blogs, for example. Blogs were geeky lists of pointers and commentary. Source.

An amazing camera & ideal Christmas gift

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

If you’re shopping for a Christmas gift in the $400 range, check out this camera, the Canon S90. I’ve used lots of digital pocket cameras. None of them hold a candle to the S90. The photos are closer to what I used to get from my Canon A1 SLR. The Canon S90 sports a very fast 3.8x Wide Angle Optical Image Stabilized Zoom lens: f/2! Its LCD is 3″ wide. 10 megapixel resolution.

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Andy McAfee

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

MIT’s Andy McAfee tells the story of Newpedia, reluctance to adopt web 2.0, and why people don’t flock to better mousetraps on this video from McKinsey. Also, how to fail: impatience, paranoia, overly conservative CIOs, poor planning. Andy’s Enterprise 2.0 is a great book, but at least half its message is carried in the video. Watch it. Pay attention. intelligence community.

Web 2.0 and Change Present Challenges to Many Learning Executives

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

Web 2.0 and Change Present Challenges to Many Learning Executives. By Rex Davenport. Chief learning officers (CLO s) are dealing with organizations the same way they did 25 years ago—focusing on full-time employees. But businesses are becoming networks. CLO s are going to need to understand that and do something about it. Learning Executives Briefing: Arthur C. Cross: No. And it’s a lot more fun.

DevLearn 09: the fire is back

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

Social learning is putting the fire back into the learning profession that’s been missing since the dot-com bust.

Good bye, HP

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

I’ve bought at least a couple of dozen HP printers in the course of the last twenty years, but I will never buy another. The OfficeJet J4500 is a poorly-designed, awful Chinese piece of garbage. David Packard and Bill Hewlett must be rolling in their graves. And HP is being run by a printer guy?

Inside Learning Technologies

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

You may be interested in the first two articles in the latest issue of Inside Learning Technologies. The first story, Speaking the Language of Business , is mine. Jane Hart wrote the second story, How to Create a Social Learning Environment. You say you haven’t heard of Inside Learning Technologies ? That’s because it’s printed in the UK, yank.

Social Learning Examples

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

At DevLearn, many people lamented the difficulty of explaining the benefits of social media to their managers and peers. We talked about building a repository of web 2.0 learning applications. It turns out that my pal Jane Hart has already done it for us! Jane mined the submissions of her delightful tools database and came up with 100+ ways to use social media for learning. This is awesome.

If you’re new to informal learning…

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

What is informal learning and why should you care? Seven and a half minutes of a workshop on informal learning at National Australia Bank last year. If you’re an old hand, you already know this. If you’re new to the world of learning, you might just learn something.

Workshop on putting informal learning to work

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

I’d leading a half-day workshop on how to implement informal learning the day before Online Educa in Berlin. For the main event , Charles Jennings and I are designing a two-day track titled Creating a New Era of Corporate Learning. Online Educa has grown to become the largest global e-learning conference for the corporate and public service sectors in education and training. Content. Agenda.

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A hedgehog view of the world

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

Thursday, April 30, 2009. Thursday, April 30, 2009. Thursday, April 30, 2009. Thursday, April 30, 2009. Thursday, April 30, 2009. Thursday, April 30, 2009. Thursday, April 30, 2009. Thursday, April 30, 2009. Thursday, April 30, 2009. Thursday, April 30, 2009. Thursday, April 30, 2009. Thursday, April 30, 2009.

What’s a chief meta-learning officer to do?

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

Pondering where a chief learning officer can leverage results. This will be a major focus of Clark Quinn’s and my workshop in conjunction with DevLearn 09. Come to DevLearn in San Jose the second week in November.

eLearning must be social

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

Six-minute video of the beginning of the closing keynote at Learning Technologies 2009 in London last month. In this segment, I recall the genesis of eLearning a little over ten years ago, the changing nature of business, and the necessity of embracing social media in corporate learning. Here are the slides from the presentation: eLearning must be social. tags: informl ).

The Engelbart Hypothesis

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

I just finished reading The Engelbart Hypothesis by Valerie Landau and Eileen Clegg. ($20 on Amazon.). While Doug Engelbart is best known as the inventor of the mouse, the man is responsible for so much more. Doug conceptualized social networking more than 50 years ago! He described using connections to boost collective intelligence before computer networks existed. If you want to know where Web 2.0

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Shifting from push to pull

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

The world of business is shifting from push to pull. In a delightful post on his Edge Perspectives , John Hagel unpacks what this means. From knowledge stocks to knowledge flows. From knowledge transfer to knowledge creation. From explicit knowledge to tacit knowledge. From transactions to relationships. From zero sum to positive sum mindsets. From push programs to pull platforms. What can I say?

Bodystorming

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

At Overlap 09 , Dennis Schleicher introduced me to bodystorming. Think physical brainstorming. 1. Do your design where your solution will unfold, or, 2. Simulate the environment your process will take place, or, 3. Prototype your solution with actors and props. Acting out forces you to be concrete. It makes ideas come alive. Seeing examples reduces the risk of misinterpretation. Drama is memorable.

Understanding Visual Thinking

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

I love this graphic from Understanding Visual Thinking: The History and Future of Graphic Facilitation by Christina Valenza and Jan Adkins in the current issue of Interactions.

What do brains have to do with it?

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

A friend of my wife asked for some recommendations on books about the brain. Here are three. Proust Was a Neuroscientist by Jonas Lehrer is a wonderful romp about how we perceive reality, told in a series of stories about artists who perceived how brains work fifty to a hundred years ahead of the scientists themselves. The findings made my head spin.

Jon Stewart litmus test

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

Just a holiday thought. Were Jon Stewart to look at how your organization helps people learn what you are asking them to do, what do you think he would say? What are you going to do about it?

Reflections on working smarter

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

No art is less spontaneous than mine. What I do is the result of reflection and the study of the great masters. Edgar Degas. Learning is not compulsory… neither is survival. -W. Edwards Deming. Formal education will make you a living. Self-education will make you a fortune. Jim Rohn. If you hold a cat by the tail, you learn things that cannot be learned in any other way. Mark Twain. Malcolm S.

ASTD groks informal learning

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

Informal Learning was the theme of Tony Bingham’s keynote presentation at ASTD’s International Conference and Exhibition in Washington this month. To my surprise, he brought up a recent article I wrote for CLO magazine on the importance of making connections. Here’s a recording of Tony’s presentation.

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Informal learning patterns

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

Learnscaping , Getting Things done in Organizations , is now available on Amazon for $25 + shipping. It’s a 160-page unbook , a continuing work in progress but containing enough meat to justify the price, I think. Learnscaping describes a dozen learning patterns, e.g. processes that organizations are using to improve performance through networked informal learning. patterns. Patterns Where 2.0

Brain Fitness

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

The SharpBrains Guide to Brain Fitness : 18 Interviews with Scientists, Practical Advice, and Product Reviews, to Keep Your Brain Sharp. Learnscapes are the factory floor of knowledge organizations; they are where workers connect to create value and learn from one another. Improving the inner workings of any aspect of a learnscape platform can increase organizational performance overall.

Business Impact of Social and Informal Learning

Jay Cross's Informal Learning

On Tuesday I led a session on Business Impact of Learning in the Real World for the Learning & Skills Group in London. To implement social/informal learning infrastructure projects, learning and development professionals need to shift their focus from learning to earning. The place to begin is by identifying a business objective that is vital to a corporate sponsor. The sponsor readily agreed.

2009 Top Posts and Topics: Kapp Notes

Kapp Notes

The ASTD Big question this month is an annual question: What did you learn about learning in 2009? So one of the tasks I will do to answer this question is to see what posts were the Best of 2009 from several different sources. How Long Does It Take to Develop One Hour of E-Learning-Updated for 2009. I had done some work in this area in 2003 and wanted to see if any information had changed. Here are my top posts via Google Analytics for 2009.(I'll So there are my most popular posts for 2009. First from eLearning Learning , Here are my top posts. Random Web 2.0