Clark Quinn

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Microdesign

Clark Quinn

When do you provide more practice, versus another example, versus a different model? There’s been a lot of talk about microlearning of late – definitions , calls for clarity , value propositions, etc – and I have to say that I’m afraid some of it (not what I’ve linked to) is a wee bit facile. Or, at least, conceptually unclear. And it’s not trivial.

Where is Clark?

Clark Quinn

A bit quiet, but providing time for some writing. So, where am I this spring? I was at ATD’s Techknowledge in January, and as this is published I’m on my way to Long Beach for their Core 4 event (sold out; if you’re one of the lucky ones there, say hi!). I’m taking the train (and a bus); look forward to watching the terrain roll by and writing. But there’re a couple more events this spring. Next week (March 30th), I’ll be giving a talk to ATD’s East Bay chapter on innovation. Again, if you’re going, say hello! The post Where is Clark?

Another model for support

Clark Quinn

And these approaches did provide away to develop the organization’s abilities to develop better learning. I was thinking about today’s post , wherein I was talking about a couple of packages that might help organizations move forward. I was reflecting back on some previous posts about engagement models, and was reminded of a more recent one. And I realized this has played out in a couple of ways. So this is another model for support for developing at least the learning side of the equation. For each, my role was to lead the design. design strategy

70:20:10 and the Learning Curve

Clark Quinn

sparked by a diagram provided by another ITA colleague, Jane Hart (that I also thought was insightful). My colleague Charles Jennings recently posted on the value of autonomous learning (worth reading!), In Charles’ post he also included an IBM diagram that triggered some associations. The point was that the closer to the work that learning is, the more value. Hence the revolution. :).

Skill based learning – How it drives an organization’s performance

This provides a solid ground for cost justification and encourages businesses to place training groups right where they should be, at the heart of a growing, thriving, learning culture Training and learning organizations today play an active role in contributing to the bottom line of any organization by aligning their objectives to the immediate business objectives.

Employee Experience

Clark Quinn

provide answers. One of the recent trends has been about ‘customer experience’, focusing the organization on a consistent and coherent customer experience from first exposure through to ongoing product or service use. And this is a ‘good thing’! I’ve participated in the efforts of an organization to achieve it, and can see the real benefits. collaborate.

What’s Your Learning Tool Stack?

Clark Quinn

Seriously, this is important, as the tools we use and provide through the organization impact the effectiveness with which people can work. And we should be connecting with colleagues in other organizations, so we might be using society-provided platforms or leverage LinkedIn groups. I woke up this morning thinking about the tools we use at various levels. Maybe OneNote?

How to learn and learn-to-learn

Clark Quinn

In your working life, how have you learnt effectively from experience, please provide an example if possible? In your working life, how have you learnt effectively from people, please provide an example if possible? In your working life, how have you learnt effectively from courses, research or investigation, please provide an example if possible? I was really upset.)

Learning Through the Wild

Clark Quinn

This is very necessary for me! :) And, importantly, the processes in nature provide a counter-balance to the artificial processes we put in place to breed plants and animals. Similarly, there are rangers who visit these camps, and provide after-dinner campfire talks. So last week I was in the wilderness for some more time, this time with family. meta-learning

Understanding Skill Based Learning for Business

This provides a solid ground for cost justification and encourages businesses to place training groups right where they should be, at the heart of a growing, thriving, learning culture One significant way that training and learning organizations can play an active role in contributing to the bottom line of any organization is by aligning their objectives to the immediate business objectives.

xAPI conceptualized

Clark Quinn

Our business intelligence system can provide aggregated data of performance for A (whatever A is being measured on: sales data, errors, time to solve customer problems, customer satisfaction, etc). A couple of weeks ago, I had the pleasure of attending the xAPI Base Camp, to present on content strategy. So I asked and was confirmed in my suspicion. Or whatever you’re expecting.

China is mobile!

Clark Quinn

I can wish that the providers in the US would work and play together a little bit more! I’m pleased to see that mLearning is taking off, and had fun sharing some of the models that I think provide leverage to rally take advantage. I’ve had the fortune to be hear in China speaking on mlearning. For one, while mobile is everywhere like many places, it’s more here.

Learning in context

Clark Quinn

In preparation for the upcoming FocusOn Learning Conference, where I’ll be running a workshop about cognitive science for L&D, not just for learning but also for mobile and performance support, I was thinking about how context can be leveraged to provide more optimal learning and performance. There are coaching resources, but not necessarily the performance resources. (And

The Grail of Effective and Engaging Learning Experiences

Clark Quinn

real world consequences providing feedback coupled with scaffolded reflection. Serious games are one way to achieve this end, by contextualizing practice as decisions in a meaningful environment and using a game engine to adapt the challenge and providing essentially unlimited practice. There’s a considerable gap between what we can be doing, and what we are doing. And we can.

Seven Simple Secrets to Off-the-Shelf Course Success

but might be a little vague in providing concrete actions, so you’ll need to dig a bit deeper. Providing OTS courseware in these situations has several advantages. OTS curriculum, it’s fairly easy to provide training to individuals or groups whenever you. While the mainstream social media platforms can provide opportunities for. Seven Simple Secrets to. capital. You’re.

Learning Strategy Issues

Clark Quinn

A second presentation was on providing tools to trainers to devolve content development locally, addressing a problem with centrally-developed content. The other thing that I was involved in at Online Educa in Berlin was a session on The Flexible Worker. Three of us presented, each addressing one particular topic. One presentation was on collaborating to produce an elearning course on sleeping better, with the presenter’s firm demonstrating expertise in elearning, while the other firm had the subject matter expertise on sleep health. And, per our design, issues emerged.

A complex look at task assignments

Clark Quinn

And the instructor reviews the reviews, and provides feedback. I was thinking (one morning at 4AM, when I was wishing I was asleep) about designing assignment structures that matched my activity-based learning model. And a model emerged that I managed to recall when I finally did get up. I’ve been workshopping it a bit since, tuning some details. Several points to make about this.

‘Form’ing learning

Clark Quinn

If we take activity-based learning seriously, we need to ensure that there are meaningful tasks set that can provide feedback. Last week I ran a workshop for an online university that is working to improve it’s learning design. Substantially. They’re ramping up their staff abilities, and we’d talked about how I could help. They have ‘content’, but wanted to improve the learning design around this. So, first of all, my focus was on formative evaluation. Ok, so not every formative evaluation should be such a situation. Then we moved on to more hands-on work.

Defining Microlearning?

Clark Quinn

Microlearning as a phrase has probably become current (he says, cynically) because elearning providers are touting it to sell the ability of their tools to now deliver to mobile. Last week on the #chat2lrn twitter chat, the topic was microlearning. It was apparently prompted by this post by Tom Spiglanin which does a pretty good job of defining it, but some conceptual confusion showed up in the chat that makes it clear there’s some work to be done. You could follow the steps and get the job done and yet need to access it again if you ever needed it. To explain, let me digress.

4 Ways to Close the Learning-Doing Gap for Front-Line Managers [GUIDE]

Live face to face: You may use a F2F training provider. Typically, the training provider will run anything from an afternoon session to a several day workshop, focusing on topics like coaching or managing performance. provide strong content and then sit back and hope. We need to provide the structure. really to provide the system and. FOUR WAYS TO CLOSE THE.

A richer suite of support

Clark Quinn

And, of course, once an individual advances far enough, there’s little anyone can be providing for them, instead they need the ‘creative friction’ of interactions with other experts and ideas to generate the new understandings that will advance the individual and the organization. Ok, but what does that mean ? As they start performing however, their needs change. Can you?

Ambiguity Denial Syndrome?

Clark Quinn

We should be providing them with models to use to interpret and adapt to situations (explain and predict). I was talking with a colleague at an event one of the past weeks, and I noted down the concept of ambiguity denial syndrome. And I’m retrospectively making up what we were talking about, but it’s an interesting idea to me. And yet, in so many ways, they don’t.

Meta-Learning Tools?

Clark Quinn

This provides the opportunity is to accelerate the process. I wrote an article for Jane Hart’s Modern Workplace Learning magazine, triggered by my thought that in her tools survey, I didn’t see a lot about a certain set of reflection (c.f. last weeks posts on diagramming) and experimentation tools: meta-learning tools. In particular, for the latter, I wondered about what there was to track your own learnings. And Jane commented to me that she knew of one, and I was reminded of more. And I think this could become an interesting area. And our success. meta-learning strategy

Support for moving forward

Clark Quinn

And I’ve tried to price them so that they’re not too dear, too hard to get approval for, but provide maximum value for minimal investment. I have to admit I’ve been a bit surprised to see that movements towards improving elearning and learning strategy haven’t had more impact. On the learning design side, e.g. the Serious eLearning Manifesto and our Future of Work project, it still seems there’s a focus on content presentation. And my question is: “why not?” ” So I’ve been trying to think what might be the barriers to move forward.

Learning Insights Guide 2017: Progress with Purpose

this report provides you with a little. but has provided skills or knowledge that have actually. provide timely value for the business. to provide, and where, when and how can it be accessed? how to use the tools that’ll provide them. value for learning is by providing ease. If you’re providing point-of- need resources, it makes sense that your.

Reactivating Learning

Clark Quinn

don’t just provide abstract knowledge). I like to link it to Rand Spiro’s Cognitive Flexibility Theory, and explain that having more ways to represent the underlying model provides more ways to understand the concept to begin with, a greater likelihood that one of the representations will get activated when there’s a problem to be solved, and will activate the other model(s) so there’s a greater likelihood of finding one that leads to a solution. If we want our learning to stick, it needs to be spaced out over time. Reactivating learning is important.

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The probability of wasting money

Clark Quinn

providing a sufficient and elaborated suite of examples to illustrate the concept in context. If you don’t provide examples, what’s the likelihood that learners will understand the full range of situations and appropriate adaptations for each? When you provide support at just the right places, and put in place the subtle tweaks on things like working with SMEs, you can develop and deliver learning that has a high likelihood of having the desired impact, and therefore have a process that’s justifiable for the investment. developing emotional engagement.

Why Work Out Loud? (for #wolweek)

Clark Quinn

They can provide pointers to useful information, they can provide tips about what worked, and didn’t, for them, and they’re better prepared for what will be forthcoming. Why should one work out loud (aka Show Your Work )? Certainly, there are risks involved. You could be wrong. You could have to share a mistake. Others might steal your ideas. So why would anyone want to be Working Out Loud ? Because the risks are trumped by the benefits. Working out loud is all about being transparent about what you’re doing. The benefits of these are multiple. Those risks?

Social Training?

Clark Quinn

She goes on and says it’s got to be “relevant, purposeful and appealing”, and what you do is provide the environment and conditions. Help people ask for help, and to offer help, and about how to provide feedback, and… And of course you need to manage the messaging around it. Sparked by the sight of a post about ‘social training’, I jokingly asked my ITA colleagues whether they could train me to be social. And, of course, they’ve posted about it. And it made me think a little bit more too. Particularly if it’s not safe to share.

Collaborative Modelling in AR (and VR)

Clark Quinn

If we can provide mechanisms (e.g. A number of years ago, when we were at the height of the hype about Virtual Worlds (computer rendered 3D social worlds, e.g. Second Life), I was thinking about the affordances. And one that I thought was intriguing was co-creating, in particular collaboratively creating models that were explanatory and predictive. And in thinking again about Augmented Reality, I realized we had this opportunity again. Models are hard enough to capture in 2D, particularly if they’re complex. Having a 3rd dimension can be valuable.

Pick my brain?

Clark Quinn

So for the first one, they wanted some feedback on their design, and we arranged that I’d investigate a representative sample and provide feedback. This didn’t take any investment in travel, but of course this feedback only points out what’s wrong, and doesn’t really provide mechanisms to improve. It’s a continual bane of a consultant’s existence that there are people who want to ‘pick your brain’ It’s really asking for free consulting, and as such, it’s insulting. Both in this case were for folks who develop content.

Brain 49

Organizational Effectiveness for L&D?

Clark Quinn

He opined that by and large, he saw the need for formal learning shrinking, and that more and more HR was focusing on providing self-learning resources instead of course. Last week included an interesting series of events and conversations. There was a formal event on innovation in learning technology (that was only partly so), and a presentation by a colleague. I also had a couple of conversations, one with said colleague following his more formal event, and another with another colleague before the initial event. And from that latter conversation came an interesting revelation.

Supporting our Brains

Clark Quinn

Other phenomena include that previous experience can bias us in particular directions, but we can put in place supports to provide lateral prompts. One of the ways I’ve been thinking about the role mobile can play in design is thinking about how our brains work, and don’t. We have formidable capabilities to predict, plan, and work together to accomplish significant goals.

Badass

Clark Quinn

While she’s more focused on developing complex products with interfaces that remove barriers like cognitive load, and provide incremental capability, this applies to learning as well. That’s the actual title of a book, not me being a bit irreverent. I’ve been a fan of Kathy Sierra’s since I came across her work, e.g. I regularly refer to how she expresses ‘ incrementalism ‘ She’s on top of usability and learning in very important ways. And she’s got a new book out that I was pleased to read: Badass : Making Users Awesome. design

eLearning Process Survey results!

Clark Quinn

The alternatives were ‘providing what’s asked for’ (e.g. The third question was looking at the feedback provided. It’s nice (and I admit somewhat surprising) that almost 40% are actually providing feedback that addresses each wrong answer. With those caveats, what did we see? The first question was looking at how we align our efforts with business needs.

Moving forward

Clark Quinn

And I’ve previously provided lots of ways to think anew about L&D, such as posts on the topics (both carrot and stick), pointed to readings that are relevant and can help, created a group to discuss the issues, and even written a book trying to point out the ways to move forward, so I’m not apologetic about also trying to point out the gaps (hey, let’s try all levers). The notion of starting small and scaling is a proven approach, and provides a chance to understand and leverage it as a basis for both internal improvement and to take it further. strategy