Clark Quinn

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Other writings

Clark Quinn

The books include The Really Useful eLearning Instruction Manual , Creating a Learning Culture , Michael Allen’s eLearning Annual 2009 , and a bunch of academic handbooks (Mobile Learning, Experiential Learning, Wiley Learning Technology ;). It occurs to me to mention some of the other places you can find my writings besides here (and how they differ ;).

Slow Learning – #change11

Clark Quinn

2009). Michael Allen’s eLearning Annual 2009. This is a longer post launching my week in the #change11 MOOC (Massively Open Online Course). . Our formal learning approaches too often don’t follow how our brains really work. We have magic now; we can summon up powerful programs to do our bidding, gaze through webcams across distances, and bring anyone and anything to pretty much anywhere. Our limitations are no longer the technology, but our imaginations.

Whither the library?

Clark Quinn

I go to libraries, and check out books. I admit it, when there’s a lot I want to read, I’d rather read it on paper (at 1200 dpi) versus on the screen. And some recent debates have got me thinking about libraries in general, public and university. There’re some issues that are unresolved, but leave me curious.

The ‘Least Assistance’ Principle

Clark Quinn

While I agree vehemently with most of a post by Lars Hyland, he said one thing I slightly disagree with, and I want to elaborate on it. He was disagreeing with “buying rapid development tools to bash out ill formed ‘e-learning’ to an audience that will not only be unimpressed but also none the wiser - or more productive&# , a point I want to nuance.

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The 7 c’s of natural learning

Clark Quinn

Yesterday I talked about the seeding, feeding, and weeding necessary to develop a self-sustaining network. I referred to supporting the activities that we find in natural learning, for both formal and informal learning. The goal is to align our organized support with our learners to optimize the outcome.

McAfee Keynote at DevLearn 2009

Clark Quinn

Andy McAfee gave us a lively and informative presentation on his view of Enterprise 2.0. Punctuated by insightful examples, he defined Enterprise 2.0

Top Posts of 2009

Clark Quinn

Predictions for 2009. I welcome your thoughts of what made these the most interesting posts of 2009. Seeing all the top 10 lists, I thought I’d look at what the top 10 posts were for Learnlets (using Google Analytics), and I have to say that the responses were interesting, as some weren’t the ones I thought were most interesting.

Predictions for 2009

Clark Quinn

Over at eLearn Magazine , Lisa Neal Gualtieri gets elearning predictions for 2009, and they’re reliably interesting. Here’re mine: The ordinary: Mobile will emerge, not as a major upheaval, but quietly infiltrating our learning experiences. We’ll see more use of games (er, Immersive Learning Simulations) as a powerful learning opportunity, and tools to make it easier to develop. Social networking will become the ‘go to’ option to drive performance improvements.

Happy Holidays!

Clark Quinn

Wishing you and yours the best for the new year

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Engaging Learning

Clark Quinn

How do you systematically design learning experiences that effectively engage the learner? This was the question I set out to address more than 5 years ago.

Extremophiles & Organizational Agility

Clark Quinn

A number of years ago, I co-wrote a chapter with Eileen Clegg called The Agility Factor , that appeared in Marcia Conner & James Clawson’s excellent collection of organizational culture articles in the book Creating a Learning Culture.

The Future of Organizational Learning event

Clark Quinn

At the upcoming DevLearn conference, Jay Cross and I are holding a pre-conference workshop titled: Be the Future of Organizational Learning: Become a Chief Meta-Learning Officer.

Virtual World Affordances, updated

Clark Quinn

Corrie Bergeron (@skydadddy) pointed out that I hadn’t really accounted for the ability to create a persona, a representation of yourself via avatar that reflects how you’d like to be perceived.

Extending Virtual World Affordances

Clark Quinn

I recently attended the 3DTLC conference, as I reported before. Chuck Hamilton presented on his (IBM’s) take on affordances on virtual worlds.

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elearning, strategically

Clark Quinn

While I’ve lots more to say, I put a short version of my vision of elearning strategy in Michael Allen’s 2009 e-Learning Annual.

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Learning Experience Creation Systems

Clark Quinn

Where do the problems lie in getting good learning experiences?

On the road again

Clark Quinn

I like going to conferences: exchanging ideas, meeting new people, and just variety.

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The Performance Environment

Clark Quinn

I’ve represented the performance ecosystem in several ways in the past, and that process continues to occur. In the process of writing up a proposal to do some social learning strategizing for an organization, I started thinking about it from the performer perspective.

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Monday Broken ID Series: Seriation

Clark Quinn

Previous Series Post. This is one in a series of thoughts on some broken areas of ID that I’ve been posting for Mondays. The intention is to provide insight into many ways much of instructional design fails, and some pointers to avoid the problems.

Workplace Learning in 10 years?

Clark Quinn

This month’s Learning Circuit’s blog Big Question is “What will workplace learning look like in 10 years&#.

Designing Learning

Clark Quinn

Another way to think about what I was talking about yesterday in revisiting the training department is taking a broader view. I was thinking about it as Learning Design, a view that incorporates instructional design, information design and experience design.

Strategy, strategically

Clark Quinn

In addition to working on the technology plan for my school district, I’ve also been assisting a not-for-profit trying to get strategic about technology.

Jumpstarting

Clark Quinn

I’m on the Board of Directors for an educational not-for-profit that has had almost 30 years of successful work with programs in classrooms, nationally and internationally. However, 5 years ago or so when I joined, they were doing almost nothing with technology.

Tools and tradeoffs

Clark Quinn

Old Site. I’ve been busy updating my website.

The Quiver & The Gun

Clark Quinn

(No, I’m not talking about weapons, or anthropological determination, sorry :). Organizations have to be nimble; the environment we face is more like sitting in the ocean waiting to ride the ever-changing waves than it is striding down a concrete road.

The big blindspot

Clark Quinn

I was talking with a colleague over lunch the other day about her company, platform, and organizational learning issues. And something occurred to me: we’re trying to merge onto a freeway right at a blindspot. In orgs, there’s a real tendency to bucket any discussion of learning into ‘training’, and dismiss it.

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Foundations

Clark Quinn

I love talking with my Internet Time Alliance colleagues, they’re always sparking me to new thoughts. In our chat, we were talking about learning, and I riffed off Charles’ comment about defining learning to opine that I see learning as a persistent behavior change (in the same context). It’s very behaviorist-influenced (given that I’m a cognitive/connectionist/constructivist type), but the point is that it needs to manifest.

Microcourses?

Clark Quinn

In the conversation with Kris Rockwell of Hybrid Learning I mentioned previously , we talked about the definition of mobile learning. We both agreed that it wasn’t about loading your average asynchronous elearning course onto the phone, and that it was more about performance support. Brevity is the soul of mobile, as well as wit.

Content Models and Mobile Delivery

Clark Quinn

On Friday, I had the pleasure of a conversation of Kris Rockwell , CEO of Hybrid Learning for my in-process mobile learning book. I’d sought him out because of how he was developing mobile. Using content models to separate out the content from how it gets rendered for display, he’s creating more flexibility across devices. This combines two of my passions, and is part of a performance ecosystem strategy.

Virtual Worlds Value Proposition

Clark Quinn

In prepping for tomorrow nights #lrnchat, Marcia Conner was asking about the value proposition of virtual worlds. I ripped out a screed and lobbed it, but thought I’d share it here as well: At core, I believe the essential affordances of the virtual world are 3D/spatial, and social. There are lower-overhead social environments (but…which I’ll get back to). However, many of our more challenging tasks are 3D visualization (e.g.

The Great eLearning Garbage Vortex

Clark Quinn

Norbert Hockenberry here, reporting on a giant floating patch of elearning that has recently been discovered. Like the Great Pacific Garbage Patch , this has been created by discarded material being gathered by oceanic currents into a giant mess. Unlike the Pacific patch, this isn’t an environmental disaster so much as a economic and social catastrophe. The waste of organizational resources, and learner time, is tragic. Seldom has so much been done, for so many, for so little gain.

Future of the training department

Clark Quinn

Entreprise Collaborative , a cross-cultural endeavor bridging English and French to provide a jumping off point on organizational collective intelligence (and co-led by my Internet Time Alliance colleague Harold Jarche ), is launching a blog carnival. The first topic is: the future of the training department in the Collaborative Enterprise. I’ve written before about the changes I see coming for organizations (e.g.

Blurring boundaries

Clark Quinn

I just downloaded a couple of new apps onto my iPhone. Okay, so one was a free trial of a game, but the other was a really interesting offering, and it led to some thoughts about organizational silos and new functionality. The app was a new release by ATT called Mark the Spot , that lets you report the occurrence and location of a problem with your coverage. This is a new way to interact with customers, allowing them to serve as a agent of “can you hear me now&# -style coverage evaluation.

The Augmented Performer

Clark Quinn

The post I did yesterday on Distributed Cognition also triggered another thought, about the augmented learner. The cited post talked about how design doesn’t recognize the augmented performer, and this is a point I’ve made elsewhere, but I wanted to capture it in a richer representation. Naturally, I made a diagram: If we look at our human capabilities, we’re very good pattern matchers, but pretty bad at exercising rote performance.