Sticky Learning

Thoughts on informal learning

Sticky Learning

It doesn''t matter if you are old/young, experienced/inexperienced. Performing well in your career is never a static knowledge/skills position. To continue to perform well requires continuing skills and knowledge growth, we are always beginners. The way we grow IS mostly through informal channels, whether we are 18 or 58. Perhaps the curse of knowledge is that as we grow older we only remember the formal learning of our younger years.

Performing through design

Sticky Learning

Jane Hart raises an excellent point with her post, Learning without Design.

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My Top 10 'Learning' books from 2010

Sticky Learning

Another year comes towards to an end and its been another year of great reading for anyone with an interest in learning. Once again I have read from a wide range of areas, all with something to add to how I think of learning. Below you'll find my top recommendations for the year along with a short summary of what I got out of reading each book. I haven't put these in a top ten order this year, there were so many contenders for the number one spot! Do you think there is a standout number one?

Learning Evaluation - good or good good

Sticky Learning

There''s always a lot of talk in the L&D community and in businesses about how to meaningfully evaluate learning. For years the evaluation of learning in workplaces has been driven by the Kirkpatrick model and it''s 4 levels. Let''s all agree (for a moment) and call this ''good''. But, the world of learning at work has changed. The rise of collaborative, networked learning doesn''t fit so well with Kirkpatrick-style evaluation.

eLearning vs. Conventional Training Approaches

Is online safety training as effective as instructor-led safety training? Find out why the best training outcomes are achieved when they are used together.

70:20:10 through a beginner's mind

Sticky Learning

One of the lovely things about life is seeing your children grow up and show interest in the world around them. A few days ago my 10 year old son looked over my shoulder as I was reading a blog post by Charles Jennings titled From Courses to Campaigns : using the 70:20:10 approach. Tom is becoming interested in the work that I do, so he asked the obvious question, 'Dad, what does 70:20:10 mean?".

70:20:10 through a beginner's mind

Sticky Learning

One of the lovely things about life is seeing your children grow up and show interest in the world around them. A few days ago my 10 year old son looked over my shoulder as I was reading a blog post by Charles Jennings titled From Courses to Campaigns : using the 70:20:10 approach. Tom is becoming interested in the work that I do, so he asked the obvious question, 'Dad, what does 70:20:10 mean?".

Learning & Design Thinking - part 1

Sticky Learning

This post and the subsequent part(s) over the next week or so are designed to accompany the visuals (below) from my session at the AITD 2012 conference. The posts are more or less the words that went along with my presentation, adding depth and detail to the quick succession of images in the presentation.

The step-wise evolution of Social Learning

Sticky Learning

For a few months now this post has been bouncing around my head. It's been through a number of diferent forms until earlier today I read a science article that brought it all together for me. The article I read was titled, "Step-wise evolution of stable sociality in primates", I'll provide the link at the end of this post for those inclined to dig a little more deeply.

Learning and Design Thinking - an introduction

Sticky Learning

Just over a month ago I was given the opportunity to present a session on 'Learning and Design Thinking' at the Australian Institute of Training and Development's 2012 conference in Sydney, Australia. I structured the session by following my own introduction to Design Thinking over the last 10 or so years, whilst at the same time providing attendees with a background to Design Thinking ideas and methods that can support innovative Learning Design.

Does Your Company Need Help Solving These 4 Common eLearning Challenges?

If you want to know how to get ahead of the game and avoid the common mishaps in selling your eLearning courses, you’ve come to the right place! Lambda Solutions has identified the most common and costly challenges faced by eLearning providers today.

Design with, not for.

Sticky Learning

I've had a short phrase stuck in my head now for a few weeks, in fact it is stuck so well that I have found myself using it numerous times when speaking with clients. The phrase is: Design with, not for. . A simple philosophy, however so often it is the straightforward things that cut right to the heart of the matter! When designing learning we have a choice, to push our approach, emphases, content, style etc onto our learners and clients. In other words we can 'design for'.

Social Learning - this is how it can look!

Sticky Learning

Let's begin with some context to this post! Like many of my blog posts the ideas come when two or more ideas collide in my head and I think, Mmm, that's interesting. Writing the blog post itself is one of the ways I get my thoughts in (some sort of) order. Right now I'm reading an excellent book, The New Social Learning by Marcia Conner and Tony Bingham. Once I've finished the book I'll certainly write a comprehensive review.

Touching the Earth Lightly - 10 thoughts for learning

Sticky Learning

As someone who makes his livelihood by designing and facilitating learning experiences for businesses I should encourage all businesses to design bigger. Bigger, longer workshops, more complex online learning, more post-workshop mentoring and more assessments of all sorts - in all ways possible I should encourage business to design learning that works best for me. Bigger, bigger, bigger. Well that's what seems to be happen a fair bit of the time! Big, complex learning interventions!

We are Learning Designers

Sticky Learning

Let me explain why I don't call myself an Instructional Designer - I do a lot more than design instruction! To me the word instructional brings forth notions of teacher led instruction in formal education settings. Chalk and Talk, Tell and Do, information being 'pushed' from the facilitator to the student. OK, I know that this is not what the majority of today's Instructional Designers actually do (they could even be offended by my description).

K-12 Guide to Distance Learning: 5 Ways to Learn Anywhere

With a continued global health crisis, schools are adapting teaching practices and learning environments. This guide covers how 5 different aspects of teaching and learning can be improved and maintained to facilitate successful distance learning.

Without delivery there is no design

Sticky Learning

I enjoy the design process, working creatively with clients to design ways to help their teams perform more effectively. The bottom line however is delivery - learning designers must be good project planners and managers. When I begin a learning design project I follow a 3-stage design process. Discovery. Design. Delivery. The first two stages look more 'designery', they look (and are) creative. (I I really enjoy these stages). The last stage, delivery is what I am paid to do. .

Lists are the enemy of learning!

Sticky Learning

I have to begin here by saying, I've never been a fan of lists, I like things a little more 'free-form', I find lists stifling. Lists put an artificial order on things, they say, after doing/reading this, the next 'logical' point is X. To make matters worse, we tend to prioritise lists by placing numbers next to each point, we tell the reader, 'point 1 before point 2, before point 3.'. When you put something in a list you tend to simplify things because a list is really a series of BRIEF points.no

Juice 63

What's wrong with Tweeting at conferences?

Sticky Learning

OK, here's my short follow up post as promised in my last post on the recent AITD conference! Let's get to the point, I went to the conference primarily because of sessions keynotes and workshops on the use of social media in learning - a real interest of mine. (as as you saw in my last post I did enjoy the conference!)

Performing through design

Sticky Learning

Jane Hart raises an excellent point with her post, Learning without Design.

5 Reasons CFOs Invest in Talent Development

In 2021, many of your competitors will invest in talent development software. If you make the right decision, invest in the right software, and if your organization is willing to use it, you can realize five decisive competitive advantages. To see those advantages, download Paycor’s latest guide, 5 Reasons CFOs Invest in Talent Development.

Performing through design

Sticky Learning

Jane Hart raises an excellent point with her post, Learning without Design.

Destinationism - why does it have to be this way?

Sticky Learning

What is destinationism? Destinationism - probably not a real word so lets explain what I'm getting at! I have a 4 year old boy who is really beginning to love playing with Lego, alot like his Dad used to do! Looking at the Lego that's on sale these days however, I've noticed one key difference between Lego when I was a boy and today, let me explain.

(Learning) Design with Intent

Sticky Learning

A few months ago I came across an excellent and free resource that I have now used parts of when designing learning solutions for clients, it's called "Design with Intent" and is the creation of Dan Lockton (a PhD student at Brunel University, Professor David Harrison (Professor of Design Research at Brunel University) and Professor Neville Stanton from the University of and two of his professors at the same University.

Informal Learning and Black Swans

Sticky Learning

Stickylearning got stuck! If you've been reading my blog since it began early two years ago you will know that I like to read. I like to challenge how I think about things, books and blogs are a couple of ways I get new ideas to think about. Well this has been all well and good however (and I can't entirely blame the book here) I read a book in May/June that got me thinking so much I haven't blogged since.

3 Guiding Principles to Support the Human Dimension in Learning

Speaker: Dr. Amy Titus, Managing Director in Human Capital at Deloitte Consulting

Join Dr. Amy Titus, Managing Director in Human Capital at Deloitte Consulting, for her exclusive session where she will be discussing the 3 guiding principles for the future of learning, and how these can affect the design of work in organizations.

Exploring the learning landscape

Sticky Learning

In my previous post I asked the question, 'Is Autonomous Learning the same as Informal Learning?' I'd been reading Daniel Pink's new book Drive and my mind had turned to thinking about autonomy, learning and motivation. The post itself was a fair reflection of this thought, but not the end. Over the last week I've kept being drawn back to questions about, and relationships between, informal/formal/autonomous learning.

TEDxMelbourne - a great day of learning!

Sticky Learning

A quick post to review today's excellent TEDx day. For those who don't know of TEDx or TED, a quick explanation. TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design and is an event originally held in the US where notable thinkers spoke in these three areas spoke to other (invited) like-minded people in a spirit of "Ideas worth spreading".

Learning Evaluation - good or good good

Sticky Learning

There's always a lot of talk in the L&D community and in businesses about how to meaningfully evaluate learning. For years the evaluation of learning in workplaces has been driven by the Kirkpatrick model and it's 4 levels. Let's all agree (for a moment) and call this 'good'. But, the world of learning at work has changed. The rise of collaborative, networked learning doesn't fit so well with Kirkpatrick-style evaluation. This morning I read Seth Godin's blog and this post "Marketing good."

Learning Evaluation - good or good good

Sticky Learning

There's always a lot of talk in the L&D community and in businesses about how to meaningfully evaluate learning. For years the evaluation of learning in workplaces has been driven by the Kirkpatrick model and it's 4 levels. Let's all agree (for a moment) and call this 'good'. But, the world of learning at work has changed. The rise of collaborative, networked learning doesn't fit so well with Kirkpatrick-style evaluation. This morning I read Seth Godin's blog and this post "Marketing good."

5 Reasons Leaders Invest in Language Training

Communication is the lifeforce of any company. Without it, productivity, employee happiness, and ultimately your business suffers. Investing in language learning better positions global business leaders to see gains in organizational effectiveness as a result.

5 great speakers from the AITD conference - a summary of ideas

Sticky Learning

A couple of weeks ago I flew up to Sydney for a few days to attend the Australian Institute of Training and Development's 2010 conference. I'd seen the program 6 months earlier and thought that there were a few sessions that looked pretty interesting. I'll give you a bit of a summary in this post and will provide a link to my Twitter feed for the conference, I think that will help to flesh out how I found some of the sessions!

10 Best (Learning) Books of 2009

Sticky Learning

After my longest break away from the stickylearning blog I thought a good place to begin was by reviewing the 10 books that I got the most from during 2009. When writing blog posts I draw ideas from a pretty wide range of areas and my reading over the last year has been equally wide. If you haven't seen or read all the books in the list, I can highly recommend all of them! 1 The Designful Company. A clear winner for my best 2009 book!

Why do we label learning?

Sticky Learning

OK, this is a post written as I'm thinking. I was just reading comments from my post on Autonomous/Formal/Informal Learning and thought I'd put some of my thoughts down in a post as they come! Let's see how it goes? My thinking is this - formal/informal/autonomous/individual - they are all labels, descriptive in their own way. Part of the problem though is that they may all mean slightly different things to different people.

Thoughts on informal learning

Sticky Learning

It doesn't matter if you are old/young, experienced/inexperienced. Performing well in your career is never a static knowledge/skills position. To continue to perform well requires continuing skills and knowledge growth, we are always beginners. The way we grow IS mostly through informal channels, whether we are 18 or 58. Perhaps the curse of knowledge is that as we grow older we only remember the formal learning of our younger years.

The Ins and Outs of Connecting Technologies in a Modern Learning Ecosystem

Speaker: TJ Seabrooks, former CEO at Rustici Software

Have you ended up with a collection of content inputs and data outputs that might be hard to wrangle? If your organization uses multiple LMSs and has content coming from many different places, or you’re heading in this direction, this webinar is for you.

Thoughts on informal learning

Sticky Learning

It doesn't matter if you are old/young, experienced/inexperienced. Performing well in your career is never a static knowledge/skills position. To continue to perform well requires continuing skills and knowledge growth, we are always beginners. The way we grow IS mostly through informal channels, whether we are 18 or 58. Perhaps the curse of knowledge is that as we grow older we only remember the formal learning of our younger years.