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50 suggestions for implementing 70-20-10 (3)

Jay Cross

The 20 percent: learning through others. Learning is social. People learn with and through others. Conversations are the stem cells of learning. People learn more in an environment that encourages conversation, so make sure you’re fostering an environment where people talk to each other. Several years ago, the local paper in Ottawa carried a story about voter betrayal. The kids will learn a lot more this way.

Forum 46

Highlights From Day Two of the Spring 2011 Chief Learning Officer Magazine Symposium

CLO Magazine

Day two of the Spring 2011 Chief Learning Officer magazine Symposium continued with more innovative learning strategies in Amelia Island, Fla. Bill Whitmore, CEO of AlliedBarton Security Services began the morning with a keynote on how to drive business performance through leadership branding. Through these strategies and the company’s leadership development programs, AlliedBarton’s “Dare to be Great” culture links directly to customer service.

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Through the Workscape Looking Glass

Jay Cross

Your Workscape is everything in your organization except the training department. It’s where work is done and where people hone the skills they need to add value. It’s the biggest frame of the big picture. It’s the organization as organism. To prosper, you need to nurture it, plant seeds, pamper the ground. It’s your job to help the system thrive. Learning Ecosystem, Learning Ecology, and Learnscape mean the same thing as Workscape.

IBM 55

Revamping 70-20-10

CLO Magazine

The 70-20-10 model for professional development is a valuable but dated approach in need of a checkup. There is a core set of frameworks that support the way organizational learning and development is conducted. Many of these, such as the Kirkpatrick evaluation levels, carrot and stick motivational programs and the ADDIE model have been around since the 1960s. Consider the ADDIE model today.