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Organizational Learning Tools

The Performance Improvement Blog

What are the tools of organizational learning? As I’ve stated in a previous blog post , a high performing organization needs a comprehensive approach to learning and a set of tools to facilitate learning. A training program, or an educational event, or even a CEO’s speech about the importance of learning is not enough. These categories of learners and tools translate into a four by three matrix of learners and learning tools.

Key Elements of a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

A “learning culture” is a community of workers continuously and collectively seeking performance improvement through new knowledge, new skills, and new applications of knowledge and skills to achieve the goals of the organization. A learning culture is a culture of inquiry; an environment in which employees feel safe asking tough questions about the purpose and quality of what they are doing for customers, themselves, and other stakeholders.

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16 Signs of a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

How do you know your organization has a learning culture ? How will people be learning? While a learning culture is an environment that’s always being developed, certain signs indicate that you are making progress. In a learning culture…. Managers are coaching ; they are partnering with direct reports to develop their capacity to achieve organizational goals. What will you see people doing?

A Productive Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

In a blog post titled, "Building a Productive Learning Culture", Thomas Handcock and Jean Martin say that businesses, because of need and demand, are increasing employee participation in training but failing to increase productivity. Even with all of these additional opportunities for learning, most workers are not acquiring the knowledge and skills they need to be successful. The authors believe that a culture change is required.

Eight Leader Habits of a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

Eight leader habits are essential to a learning culture. These are behaviors ingrained in the routines and rituals of organizations that are continually learning and learning how to learn. Leaders in these organizations do the following: Send the message - Leaders communicate the importance of learning to the organization. Build trust - Employees will invest time and effort in learning if they trust their managers.

Becoming a Learning Culture: Competing in an Age of Disruption

The Performance Improvement Blog

Any company, faced with these kinds of disruptive forces must keep learning. Employees must learn how to use new computers and new apps, how to operate new, high tech machinery, how to be responsive to customer demands, how to create innovative products and services, how to manage a multi-cultural, multi-generational workforce, how to work effectively in cross-functional teams, and how to plan for a future that is constantly in flux. Learning is just-in-time, on-demand.

No Time to Learn

The Performance Improvement Blog

One of the concerns that worry training and learning professionals most about leading culture change in their organizations is that managers will say that they don’t have time to facilitate and support employee development. These managers don’t value learning. Maybe there was a time when you could learn a set of skills in your youth and then build a career around those abilities. The only way to keep pace and maybe even get ahead of the curve is to keep learning.

This Is What I Believe About Learning in Organizations

The Performance Improvement Blog

The Purpose of Business is Learning. But none of this is possible without learning. At its core, any high performing organization is about learning; continually using new information to become smarter, better, and more effective. To survive and thrive today, industries need innovation which is essentially about learning. Companies must learn more deeply about their customers and markets. Training Is Not Learning. It’s the Culture.

6 Steps To Creating Learning Ecosystems (And Why You Should Bother)

Learnnovators

70:20:10 has shone a spotlight on the limits of formal learning. In contrast, social and experiential learning continue to be veritable goldmines of productivity, placing learners at the centre of their story and demanding a major shift from Learning & Development professionals. Central to this cultural shift is the understanding that learning happens by learners, not to them. That’s where learning ecosystems come in.

Are Managers Too Busy to Learn?

The Performance Improvement Blog

One of the barriers to creating and sustaining a learning culture in organizations is the no-time myth. Managers resist attending formal training events and participating in other kinds of learning activities (elearning, mentoring, coaching, action-learning, communities of practice, internal wikis, etc.) The problem is that managers don’t make learning a high priority. This is learning, too, and takes little, if any, extra time.

Reprise: Learning to Compete

The Performance Improvement Blog

The rate at which an organization learns may be the only sustainable competitive advantage. If you are learning more rapidly than the competition, you can get ahead and stay ahead. Clawson in their chapter in the book, Creating a Learning Culture , write this about competition and learning: Today it seems that organizations need to be able to do more than just adapt: they must become agile in the face of constantly changing conditions.

Agile 162

Reprise: Learning to Compete

The Performance Improvement Blog

The rate at which an organization learns may be the only sustainable competitive advantage. If you are learning more rapidly than the competition, you can get ahead and stay ahead. Clawson in their chapter in the book, Creating a Learning Culture , write this about competition and learning: Today it seems that organizations need to be able to do more than just adapt: they must become agile in the face of constantly changing conditions.

Agile 149

Learning All the Time

The Performance Improvement Blog

Bernie Donkerbrook, EQMentor, wrote this response to my post : “ Learning all the time ” means making learning part of the culture of an organization. This means that learning (using Schein’s definition of culture below) is that employees are actually doing and behaving in the following manner, (Follows the premise of first, ‘ Knowing’ , then ‘ Agreeing’ and finally actually ‘ Doing !’). That learning is valued and expected at all levels of the organization.

Aligning Employee Learning with the Organization

The Performance Improvement Blog

Improving employee learning and performance in organizations today means systems change. I wish it were otherwise, but learning is not just a classroom activity anymore, it must be a total system activity that takes into account strategic goals of the organization, the culture of the organization (values, beliefs, artifacts, structure, etc.), Learning that makes a difference occurs when all of these factors are aligned. . Create a context for learning.

Learning to Compete

The Performance Improvement Blog

The rate at which an organization learns may be the only sustainable competitive advantage. If you are learning more rapidly than the competition, you can get ahead and stay ahead. Clawson in their chapter in the book, Creating a Learning Culture , write this about competition and learning: Today it seems that organizations need to be able to do more than just adapt: they must become agile in the face of constantly changing conditions.

Agile 138

Leaders Learning about Learning

The Performance Improvement Blog

I explained the limitations of formal training and the need for taking an organizational learning perspective. I argued that in order for any kind of learning intervention (training, coaching, mentoring, action learning, etc.) to have a positive impact on achieving the organization’s goals, managers had to take an active role in supporting learning. They wanted to know specifically what they could do to facilitate learning.

50 Ways to Lever Learning

The Performance Improvement Blog

In a learning culture , formal training is just one of many methods used to facilitate employee learning. In a learning culture, we start with the performance goal and then select the mix of methods that will help employees acquire and retain the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and beliefs they need in order to achieve those goals. Instructor-centered class (fact to face) – traditional classroom in which instructor controls the content and learning process.

A Manager's View of Employee Learning

The Performance Improvement Blog

I love the sense of understanding, enthusiasm and acceptance the leadership team conveys here regarding their role in learning. As you might expect, based on my input to a previous blog (3/25, Training Isn’t Learning ), I was delighted to see the emphasis on the necessary role of the manager! For me, ‘accountable’ means managers are as much, and maybe more, responsible as the individual learner for applying learning and delivering results.

The Essential Guide to Learning Analytics in the Age of Big Data

Lambda Solutions

Download The Essential Guide to Learning Analytics in the Age of Big Data and keep it as your eLearning secret weapon! This article is designed to be your A-to-Z guide to learning analytics. You’ll discover: The basic concepts of learning analytics. Level 2: Learning.

Partnering With the C-Suite

CLO Magazine

Successful chief learning officers understand that business longevity is defined by an ability to innovate and adapt. They know that unless organizations can learn faster than the competition — and faster than the rate of change — they are destined to take a back seat in the marketplace. If the investment can be better spent in another area with more impact, then learning should gladly offer up the budget.

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