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Ultimate eLearning terms you should know: Part 1 (A-L)

LearnUpon

ADL (Advanced Distributed Learning): An initiative established by the US Department Of Defense in 1999, aiming to make the delivery of online training consistent across content formats, technologies, and organizations. AICC (Aviation Industry Computer-Based-Training Committee): The first official eLearning content standard, AICC was developed by the Aviation Industry CBT Committee in 1993 as a CD-ROM based standard.

The Building Blocks of a Successful e-Training Program

ICS Learning

You have many important decisions that need to be made ranging from issues related to the use of technology to required facilities to instructional design to software development and media production. IT professionals including network engineers, software developers, database engineers and technical support staff. Phase 4: Software Development. Environmental (hardware, software, bandwidth, etc.) Learning Content Management and Authoring Systems.

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The Ultimate Glossary of eLearning Terms

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It’s a five-phase framework that instructional designers use; a guideline for building effective training and learning support tools. ADL (Advanced Distributed Learning). The first official eLearning content standard, AICC was developed by the Aviation Industry CBT Committee in 1993 as a CD-ROM based standard. A predecessor to SCORM, AICC was difficult to work with and many steps were required to get content in the format running in a learning management system (LMS).

The A to Z of eLearning Acronyms

LearnUpon

It is a guideline for building effective training and performance support tools in five phases. Authoring Tool. An eLearning content authoring tool is a software package which content developers use to create and package eLearning content deliverable to end users using SCORM or xAPI standards. The Graphics Interchange Format developed by software writer Steve Wilhite while working for CompuServe in 1987 (who pronounces it jif).