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Rapid eLearning Tools

Tony Karrer

Rapid eLearning Tools Satisfaction from the eLearningGuild Research reported Feb 2007 - Course Authoring and Rapid eLearning Tool Satisfaction See also Software Simulation Tools. When the above graphic was taken, it shows the overall satisfaction reported by eLearningGuild members about various tools. For example, in 2007 PowerPoint to eLearning Shootout they compared: Articulate www.articulate.com Atlantic Link www.atlantic-link.co.uk

The big question: choosing tools

Clive on Learning

The Learning Circuits Blog Big Question for July is 'how should e-learning developers choose their authoring tools given the proliferation of tools on the market?' Well, I posted on this subject just last week (see Confused of Brighton ) and even listed my own top ten tools , authoring or otherwise, in a subsequent post. Online tools tend to be less sophisticated but really do facilitate collaborative development.

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Confused of Brighton

Clive on Learning

Two situations recently have got me thinking about e-learning authoring tools. Secondly, I've been doing some work for a client of mine that has an LMS with some authoring capabilities, trying to compare what they have to offer with what's available elsewhere. Everybody's got an authoring tool. Of course, all authoring tools have always described themselves as quick and easy to use, with absolutely no programming required, but of course we know otherwise.

Training Standards

Tony Karrer

What about Adobe products vs. Articulate vs. Qarbon ? Until eLearning vendors bite the bullet, come to real standards on formats, and then the tools and structure can build up to support those standards, eLearning is never going to be what it can be. When CBT (CD-ROM based multimedia training) came out, there were a lot of different authoring tools and approaches that came along with it. I used to love these tools.

Rapid e-learning is swimming in too small a pond

Clive on Learning

I attended the panel discussion on 'the future of rapid e-learning tools' at the eLearning Guild's Annual Gathering in Boston today with a misunderstanding. Bersin used a similar definition: "Web-based training programmes that can be created in a few weeks and which are authored largely by SMEs". They both refer to the authors of this rapid content as being SMEs. But has anyone told the rapid content development tool builders?