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Publishing Adobe Captivate Projects: SWF, HTML5, or Both?

The Logical Blog by IconLogic

by Kevin Siegel      If you attend our  Adobe Captivate Beginner class , you will learn how to publish projects as SWF (for desktop users) and HTML5 (for mobile users).  Currently, the most common way to publish a Captivate project is as a Flash SWF, an excellent solution because SWF files provide the best multimedia experience for your learners. While HTML5 may one day completely replace SWF, today is not that day.

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Adobe Captivate: Live, Online Training Now Available in Central European Time Zone Hours

The Logical Blog by IconLogic

  This beginner Adobe Captivate training class will quickly have you creating eLearning and mLearning lessons that include software simulations, demonstrations and soft-skills (compliance training). And you will learn how to publish your lessons for the widest possible audience including how to output both Flash (SWF) and HTML5 (so that your lessons will play on such mobile devices as the Apple iPad). Adobe Captivate

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Step-by-Step Guide for Creating Software Simulations Using Adobe Captivate

CommLab India

Then, you can develop software simulations that engage your learners with Adobe Captivate easily. This blog is a step-by-step guide for developing software simulations using Adobe Captivate. If you would like to record the steps performed in MS Word, PowerPoint, Photoshop, MS Outlook, or any other application, you can select the ‘Application’ option in Adobe Captivate. Source: Adobe help manual). You can publish your software simulation to a swf.

10 Widely Used Authoring Tools that Support HTML5 and Empower E-learning

CommLab India

The adaptability and flexibility of HTML5 can address learner requirements and industry experts’ needs at the same time. Flash is Fading Away. Two decades ago, e-learning developers used to develop courseware on the primary code base of JavaScript and action script in Adobe Flash. Flash was also supported by the Sharable Content Object Reference Model (SCORM) standards. Flash files (.swf) Technology and e-learning experts consider Flash outdated.