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New MOOC Research: What the Findings Mean for Corporate Training

Your Training Edge

MOOCs generate a huge amount of data, which can be collected and analyzed to gain insights into how people learn, what teaching methods are most effective, and many other areas related to learning. A new analysis by MOOC pioneer George Siemens will hopefully finally put this issue to rest.

New Technologies Making MOOCs Even Better

Your Training Edge

Early MOOCs were often nothing more than long video lectures with a few multiple choice questions at the end—if you read much MOOC literature, you will know that these early implementations were roundly criticized for their poor pedagogy and almost complete lack of meaningful learning experiences.

Rapid Elearning and MOOCs: Keeping Up with Change

Your Training Edge

Currently, rapid elearning MOOCs are most appropriate for courses whose goal is knowledge transfer, rather than higher-level synthesis or analysis. Developers in both areas must build courses based on sound pedagogy and best practices. To be effective, rapid elearning MOOCs, like all training elements, need to be relevant, address employees’ needs, and have a real impact on job performance. Learn more about Bryant at LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/bryantnielson.

How would you go about converting a face to face course to an eLearning format?

eFront

This analysis will help you to choose the right eLearning format for your course. In my opinion learning becomes more effective when people are mutually active with the learning materials, with the learning environment. Joan T.

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Ultimate eLearning terms you should know: Part 2 (M-Z)

LearnUpon

Defining clear objectives also helps to assess the effectiveness of a course after its completion. Pedagogy: Derived from the Greek for ‘to lead’, pedagogy is a teacher-centred approach to educational activities in online and face-to-face environments.

Cammy Beans Learning Visions: Instructional Design: Whats in a name?

Learning Visions

Professional content It may be my perception, but the pedagogy that is often so prevalent in the writing of teachers, about resources for teaching and learning, is often scarce in the writing of instructional designers, when writing about the same things. Is it the pedagogy?