Is HTML5 Ready for eLearning Development?

Upside Learning

Last week, while justifying Apple’s refusal to allow Flash player on iPhone/iPad, Steve Jobs wrote– “ New open standards created in the mobile era, such as HTML5, will win on mobile devices (and PCs too) ”. A few days before the launch of iPad Apple had released a list of ‘iPad ready’ websites having support for HTML5. Clearly Apple is backing HTML 5, CSS 3 and JavaScript for developing future web applications. in Flash Based eLearning Development?

Adobe AIR & Flash Player 10.1– How it Can Benefit Mobile Learning

Upside Learning

Adobe also unveiled Flash platform 10.1 Flash is the favorite delivery platform (development tool) for eLearning courses due to its huge install-base and ability to produce engaging content. Due to this (and some other reasons like processor capability, device features, etc), not all devices support Flash – neither within the web-browser nor outside of it. Y ou can use existing Flash development skills to provide engaging elearning apps for handheld devices. -

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Learning Content in Crisis? The How and Why of Moving from Flash to HTML5

gomo learning

The Adobe Flash format, once the primary standard for learning content, will no longer be supported after December 31st 2020. You may still have useful Flash learning content in your curriculum or in your archives. So, what happened to cut Flash’s market share from 28.5%

An Overview of HTML5

Integrated Learnings

Apple's recent refusal to support Flash is the latest of many headaches web developers have had to endure as the web has matured but standards have been slow to respond. I mentioned this to a Flash developer at lunch today and I could see the frustration in his eyes wondering how he's going to meet the needs of his customers who use iPads. Standardizing these headaches so that web development is more consistant across all web-based devices is the goal of HTML5.

The Open Screen Project – Will It Succeed?

Upside Learning

The Open Screen Project was started to help create a singular experience on multiple devices (using Flash) be it Computers, Mobiles, TV or Game consoles. Adobe wants to latch onto the developer group that’s comfortable with Flash, yet wants their services and content to run across platforms – this by making its runtime consistent across all devices and encourage developers to design accordingly. Obviously, using Flash platform tools offered by Adobe.

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Flash & The Future of Interactive Content for eLearning

Adobe Captivate

But as open standards like HTML5, WebGL and WebAssembly have matured over the past several years, most now provide many of the capabilities and functionalities that plugins pioneered and have become a viable alternative for content on the web. Given this progress, and in collaboration with several of our technology partners – including Apple , Facebook , Google , Microsoft and Mozilla – Adobe is planning to end-of-life Flash. – Are eLearning users adopting HTML5?

Flash 76

Online multimedia content in e-learning: Flash vs. HTML5

Matrix

The last few years had witnessed a strong debate over the two technologies that make possible the embedding of multimedia content files in a web page: Flash and HTML5. It's like a virtual war between apples and oranges. You can live a perfect life by eating just apples and you can live a perfect life by eating just oranges. Apples, aka Flash. Flash is the best — at least for now — on interactivity and video content production. Oranges, aka HTML5.

HTML5 in E-learning – Signaling the End of the Flash Player

CommLab India

For years, the Flash Player reigned supreme in the world of e-learning. It seemed that the Flash Player was destined to rule the technology-enabled learning world. However, all that changed with the statement of one person – Steve Jobs, who declared in 2010 that iOS, Apple’s mobile operating system would not support the Flash Player. Apple’s products, the iPhone and the iPad, had (and continue to have) a large share of the mobile device market.

HTML5 development poised to rise, Apple responsible

Aptara

HTML5 development poised to rise, Apple responsible. Working in the HTML5 coding language has remained an intriguing proposition for content developers over the past few years. As such, HTML5 conversion and development have cemented their position in discourse, helped along every once in a while by an announcement from one or other of the constantly competing tech giants that make up the overall IT industry. Apple drives HTML5.

All You Need to Know About Converting Flash-based E-learning to HTML5

CommLab India

There is quite a buzz around Flash and HTML5 these days. Ever since Google announced it would block Flash in its browsers by the end of this year, the main topic of discussion in the e-learning world has been the conversion of existing flash-based e-learning courses to HTML5. Here are 4 blogs that can help you understand all about converting Flash-based e-learning to HTML5. HTML5 and eLearning – What is it all about?

The Shift from Flash to HTML5

Firmwater

A recent change is important to note here was when major companies like Google, Apple and Microsoft phased out Adobe's Flash Player from their web browsers and opted for the open and mobile-friendly HTML5.So The shift from flash to HTML5 in web browsers means there needs to be a similar shift from flash-based content to content published to support HTML5.

Is Adobe Flash Going Away?

eLearningMind

In Short… Adobe Flash Will Be Discontinued, Is Going Away, & Adobe Flash Will Be Dead. At the end of July last year, Adobe announced the impending death of Adobe Flash in 2020, and letting out a collective sigh of relief, most of the internet and its major browsers agreed to do the same. Google has already begun taking steps to remove Flash from their browser while the rest of the web settles in for the long goodbye. So, What Will Replace Flash?

Flash is Dead: Long Live HTML5 for eLearning

LearnUpon

Adobe Flash technology has helped support the delivery of online multimedia content for nearly two decades. Three popular eLearning formats are also largely dependent on Flash technology for their delivery medium: SCORM, Tin Can (xAPI), and video. Flash will be allowed to die in 2020 as Adobe ceases to support the standard. Extensive use of Flash makes this development a concern for those of us working in the eLearning industry. The troubled history of Flash.

Publishing Adobe Captivate Projects: SWF, HTML5, or Both?

The Logical Blog by IconLogic

by Kevin Siegel      If you attend our  Adobe Captivate Beginner class , you will learn how to publish projects as SWF (for desktop users) and HTML5 (for mobile users).  Currently, the most common way to publish a Captivate project is as a Flash SWF, an excellent solution because SWF files provide the best multimedia experience for your learners. According to Adobe, the Flash Player is installed on the majority of the world's computers.

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HTML5 and Flash: Two Ways to Create Interactivity in Mobile Learning

Vikas Joshi on Interactive Learning

Most e-learning developers assume the availability of the free Flash plug-in on the learner's browser. Some mobile devices may support Flash, others don't. The Apple iPad, iPhone and iPod are examples where your Flash elements simply won't work. Apple proposes that you use HTML5 instead, to build rich interfaces. In another post on HTML5 , I talk about its impact on web interactivity.

HTML5: Standardize on MP4 (mostly)

ICS Learning

Back in 2011 , we opined on the best approach to deliver video online which, at that time, was using Flash. About a year later, we furthered our thoughts on web-delivered video noting how the HTML5 movement had made solid progress. Finally no more reason for web video to be output to multiple versions (again)…unless you find dogmatic or perceptive reasons to… Otherwise, one MP4/h.264 source file should suffice for all current browsers across all (or at least most) devices.

Phasing out Flash

OpenSesame

In the early 2000’s, Flash became the dominant platform for online videos, interactive sites, and games. If you’ve watched anything on YouTube or any other video streaming provider, it’s guaranteed that you’ve used Flash to view it. In July 2017, Adobe announced that by the end of 2020 they’ll no longer update or distribute Flash. In addition, the most recent updates for many leading browsers, such as Chrome and Firefox, have been disabling Flash by default.

8 reasons for using HTML5 for authoring eLearning course

Adobe Captivate

Adobe Flash has been a productive tool for authoring these courses. But, it suffered from the drawback that OS platforms of latest handheld devices don’t extend support for Flash. HTML5 has superseded Flash as a viable option for authoring eLearning courses because it is supported by all smartphones and tablets. The advantages of using HTML5 In eLearningcourses are numerous and have been enumerated below for your ready reference.

HTML5 rising: Showdown imminent with Flash

Aptara

HTML5 rising: Showdown imminent with Flash. It's time to seriously consider HTML5 as a development medium if companies haven't already made that choice. The language has been building steam, aided by such events as Apple's choice to abandon Flash and the momentum of multiple device use, which incentivizes Web apps that function in a browser across platforms. This is the promise of the HTML5 movement.

Is Adobe Flash Going Away?

eLearningMind

In Short… Adobe Flash Will Be Discontinued, Is Going Away, & Adobe Flash Will Be Dead. At the end of July last year, Adobe announced the impending death of Adobe Flash in 2020, and letting out a collective sigh of relief, most of the internet and its major browsers agreed to do the same. Google has already begun taking steps to remove Flash from their browser while the rest of the web settles in for the long goodbye. So, What Will Replace Flash?

How will Flash’s demise affect your SCORM courses?

LearnUpon

Support for Adobe Flash Player ends in 2020. And as Flash has been integral to eLearning for over 20 years, it’s retirement will have a significant effect. Currently, you can export SCORM packages to Flash, HTML, or both. Flash is the most popular output type, so it’s likely that your courses are SWF Flash-based. SWF courses do not work on certain devices; Apple devices. HTML5 works on all devices so it’s the obvious choice as a successor.

Phasing out Flash: all your courses will be mobile ready by 2019

OpenSesame

In the early 2000s, Flash became the dominant platform for online videos, interactive sites, and games. If you’ve watched anything on YouTube or any other video streaming provider, it’s guaranteed that you’ve used Flash to view it. In July 2017, Adobe announced that by the end of 2020 they’ll no longer update or distribute Flash. In addition, the most recent updates for many leading browsers, such as Chrome and Firefox, have been disabling Flash by default. .

Latest HTML5 convert: YouTube

Aptara

Latest HTML5 convert: YouTube. Ever since Apple made the calculated decision that its devices could get by without Adobe Flash, the pressure has been on for content providers to find a new way forward. As a language that does not require a plugin to display correctly, HTML5 has stepped up to take that mantle. As Engadget recently reported, another major website has decided to make HTML5 the default, rather than an option.

Remaining HTML5 hurdles falling

Aptara

Remaining HTML5 hurdles falling. The switch to HTML5 for cross-platform content has received a few important boosts in the past few years. Arguably, the real momentum began to build when Apple declared Flash dead on its handheld gadgets, a move that left developers unable to fall back on the venerable plugin when it came time to design their Web apps. It may finally be time for widespread HTML5 conversion and new development in a variety of industries.

HTML5 – Let the Games Begin!

eLearning 24-7

HTML5 – Game Changer. Without boring you to death on the details of HTML5, what I will say is this will be a game changer in our industry for a number of reasons. and YouTube (beta) are already offering videos in HTML5 players. Improved interactivity over Flash. Open Source not Proprietary like Flash. Not buggy – Flash is buggy. Flash requires a plugin (especially for updates). Can I see HTML5 sites now? Even Flash.

HTML5 – Let the Games Begin!

eLearning 24-7

HTML5 – Game Changer. Without boring you to death on the details of HTML5, what I will say is this will be a game changer in our industry for a number of reasons. and YouTube (beta) are already offering videos in HTML5 players. Improved interactivity over Flash. Open Source not Proprietary like Flash. Not buggy – Flash is buggy. Flash requires a plugin (especially for updates). Can I see HTML5 sites now? Even Flash.

What Do We Mean When We Say HTML5?

The Learning Circuits

No doubt you’ve heard at least a whisper about HTML5 over the last year. It’s a Flash-killer. Another complication is that “HTML5” is often used to refer to a range of modern web technologies. Simply speaking, HTML is the language that the Web is written in, and HTML5 is the most recent version of it. Why is HTML5 important? How are we supposed to deliver those rich learning experiences that our learners are used to if we can’t output to Flash?

Mobile browsers increasing HTML5 compatibility

Aptara

Mobile browsers increasing HTML5 compatibility. Recent trends in the business technology world have pointed to the greater importance of platform-agnostic development using languages such as HTML5. Mobile devices work with HTML5. One of the early concerns with HTML5 was that some browsers did not display this content correctly. This indicates developers know HTML5 content is coming and are prioritizing compatibility with browser interfaces. The HTML5 market.

Multimedia experiences growing stronger in HTML5

Aptara

Multimedia experiences growing stronger in HTML5. The movement away from using Flash in both internal and external content by businesses has been slowed by one important factor: This language has been seen as the primary distribution method for rich multimedia such as audio and video. This attachment to multimedia means businesses were waiting for a viable alternative way to send out their multimedia communications - and it appears they have received one in the form of HTML5.

HTML5 close to W3C certification

Aptara

HTML5 close to W3C certification. Development has continued on the HTML5 standard over the past few years, cementing its place in the enterprise world. In that time, HTML5 has provided a helpful bridge for companies eager to develop software that can easily move between different mobile operating systems. This will finalize the features list of HTML5, with the ideas that don't make the cut pushed back until the debut of HTML5.1. The lure of HTML5 development.

ELearning moves beyond the Flash era

Aptara

ELearning moves beyond the Flash era. The transition to HTML5. While it was once the backbone of the Internet, Flash technology is now in decline. Revealed as a system full of security holes and requiring extra installation to run, it has taken a back seat to HTML5. The main advantage of the latter method its the fact that it will run across device types without the sort of plugin needed for Flash. Those methods have now become as antiquated as Flash itself.

HTML5: A future without plugins?

Aptara

HTML5: A future without plugins? Such companies thrive on the use of languages such as HTML5, which allows development across everything from desktop PCs to iOS devices, a range that puts it beyond older technologies such as Adobe Flash. To achieve this goal, it's focusing its efforts on distributing content through an HTML5 interface. The source reported that the next version of Apple's OS X will support plugin-free Netflix streaming.

Amazon announcement shows HTML5's versatility

Aptara

Amazon announcement shows HTML5's versatility. Web apps developed with HTML5 are an answer to one of the key questions in mobile content development , namely which platforms to focus on. By creating materials with HTML5, companies can cross operating system boundaries easily, even reaching both PC and mobile users with the same app. This isn't a bad thing - competition between Apple and Google helps keep the hardware appealing and forward-looking.

Top 11 Disruptive E-Learning Technologies For 2013

Learnnovators

HTML5. HTML5 is a new version of the Hyper Text Markup Language (HTML) from the Web Hypertext Application Technology Working Group (WHATWG) and the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). are already HTML5 compatible to a great extend while many others are working hard to provide true compatibility. It is interesting to note that even the desktop browsers are moving towards standardizing on HTML5 in the near future.

Pressure mounting to lose Flash in Web content

Aptara

Pressure mounting to lose Flash in Web content. The struggle of HTML5 against Flash is one of the Internet's current main elements. Flash is the entrenched choice, due to its longtime presence on Web pages. However, ever since Apple threw down the gauntlet and ditched the standard in its devices, the field has seemed wide open. It's not a fun process, and HTML5 is meant to avoid those types of extra downloads.

When are System Simulations Appropriate?

Integrated Learnings

do they have Flash capability)? Captivate publishes simulations as Flash files as the default, so you need to ensure that the computers your audience uses includes the capability to play Flash files. Remember, for mLearning, Apple products such as the iPhone and iPad do not run Flash. However, newer versions of simulation software allow creation of HTML5 , which alleviates this issue. By Dean Hawkinson.

Mobile Web progress casts HTML5 in good light

Aptara

Mobile Web progress casts HTML5 in good light. These mobile content questions are inevitably tied up with the past, present and future of the HTML5 language. According to The Register contributor Matt Asay, recent progress in compatibility will help HTML5 find its foothold in the mobile space. He explained that these moves were initiated by Apple and followed by Google. HTML5 vs. Flash. Developing for mobile today means crossing boundaries.