7 Reasons Why You Must Convert Flash Games to HTML5

Hurix Digital

The advent of HTML5 – the open web standard – with versatile native multimedia features offered the alternative needed for a departure from Adobe Flash. However, Flash Player’s popularity began to decline sometime after 2010, given its vulnerability to malware attacks.

HTML5 in E-learning – Signaling the End of the Flash Player

CommLab India

For years, the Flash Player reigned supreme in the world of e-learning. It seemed that the Flash Player was destined to rule the technology-enabled learning world. However, all that changed with the statement of one person – Steve Jobs, who declared in 2010 that iOS, Apple’s mobile operating system would not support the Flash Player. Apple’s products, the iPhone and the iPad, had (and continue to have) a large share of the mobile device market.

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HTML5 making inroads with Apple and Mozilla

Aptara

HTML5 making inroads with Apple and Mozilla. Adobe Flash lost its bid to become the main content distribution language when Apple pulled support, meaning developers have had to look further afield. Now, with many environmental factors falling into place, the time could be right for HTML5 to step up. Certainly, there has been enough activity to warrant HTML5 conversion for important pieces of content that producers want to ensure is visible across the device spectrum.

Flash: an End of an Era – What You Need To Know

Aptara

In 1996 Macromedia first introduced the Flash Player, developed to play videos, animations, and audio and to support enhanced interactivity in web browsers. Over the years web browsers matured and so did Flash Player, which became the most widely used plug-in to play multimedia elements on a web page. Frequent updates to Flash Player, and increases in its usage provided hackers with an opportunity to exploit the security vulnerability of Flash and to hack systems.

Migrating from Flash to HTML5 – Part 1

ePath Learning

. The Adobe Flash Player is going away at the end of 2020. In this two-part blog post, she answers some key questions that will help you get started with the Flash to HTML5 conversion process. The solution is to convert your Flash-based courses to HTML5.

A sign of the future: Adobe embracing HTML5

Aptara

A sign of the future: Adobe embracing HTML5. These businesses will instead have to gravitate toward technologies such as HTML5, which handily solve the problems of a fragmented mobile ecosystem and the overlap between the use cases for smartphones, tablets and notebook computers. HTML5 asserts its new dominance. CIO recently reported on the decline and fall of older technologies such as Adobe Flash in the face of HTML5.

HTML5 presents platform-spanning development option

Aptara

HTML5 presents platform-spanning development option. While HTML5 gained its cultural cachet as a mobile content standard, the highly touted substitute for Flash on Apple devices, its strength comes from the fact that it works across platforms, desktop, smartphone and tablet inclusive. Organizations simultaneously committing to create more materials and facing audiences that want to reach them on every device type imaginable will find an ally in HTML5.

Multimedia experiences growing stronger in HTML5

Aptara

Multimedia experiences growing stronger in HTML5. This attachment to multimedia means businesses were waiting for a viable alternative way to send out their multimedia communications - and it appears they have received one in the form of HTML5. There is an urgency to adopt HTML5 and begin the journey away from Flash.". HTML5 makes its move. To commit to Flash to HTML5 conversion, organizations must be sure the latter technology is ready for prime time.

The Web without Flash is getting closer

Aptara

A general movement of Flash to HTML5 conversion has changed the fabric of the Web. A recent Gizmodo article took a bold position in the Flash vs. HTML5 debate: The source stated the battle is as good as over, and there's no need to stick with Flash. The time to disable the latter technology is now, the piece posited, and a mass exodus away from Flash may help the movement to HTML5 reach completion. The Web without Flash is getting closer.

HTML5 rising: Showdown imminent with Flash

Aptara

HTML5 rising: Showdown imminent with Flash. It's time to seriously consider HTML5 as a development medium if companies haven't already made that choice. The language has been building steam, aided by such events as Apple's choice to abandon Flash and the momentum of multiple device use, which incentivizes Web apps that function in a browser across platforms. This is the promise of the HTML5 movement.

Pressure mounting to lose Flash in Web content

Aptara

The struggle of HTML5 against Flash is one of the Internet's current main elements. However, ever since Apple threw down the gauntlet and ditched the standard in its devices, the field has seemed wide open. Now, it's worth leaders considering Flash to HTML5 conversion for their rich resources to fit in with the new wave of computing and Web apps. It's not a fun process, and HTML5 is meant to avoid those types of extra downloads.

Mobile content is the new face of the Web

Aptara

The major players Of course, before beginning content production efforts, organizations need to decide which type of hardware and software they should target. As a recent Chitika Insights survey found, North American smartphone Web use is still bisected between the Apple iPhone and various devices running Google Android, with Microsoft Windows Phone a distant third. This is where HTML5 conversion comes in, yielding rich content that works regardless of operating system.