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E-Learning Design Part 2: Observable and Measurable Outcomes

CDSM

This is known as our ‘ pedagogy ’. The use of observable and measurable outcomes in learning is linked to something called ‘ Bloom’s Taxonomy ’. Between 1949 and 1953, a committee of educators – chaired by Benjamin Bloom – met for a series of conferences designed to improve curricula and examinations. Since the taxonomy’s first volume ( Handbook I: Cognitive ) was published in 1956, Bloom’s name has been synonymous with lesson planning for teachers across the world.

How Technology Is Powering Learning

Magic EdTech

While the critical drivers of education stay unchanged, this transformation supports a simple replication of traditional classroom pedagogies. Class discussions are now discussion forums, and the good old exams are now powered by machines. .

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How Technology Is Powering Learning

Magic EdTech

While the critical drivers of education stay unchanged, this transformation supports a simple replication of traditional classroom pedagogies. Class discussions are now discussion forums, and the good old exams are now powered by machines. .

Redefining the Taxonomy of eLearning

CommLab India

Instructional designers have for long fallen back on the celebrated Bloom’s classification system, created for traditional classroom training, to define their learning objectives and create courses that meet the needs of learners. Taking the differing requirements of e-learning and evolving training pedagogies into account, the classification was reconstructed by Loren Anderson, a former student of Bloom in 2001, to incorporate modern approaches of training that reflect current needs.

How to Effectively Shift to Online Teaching: The Ultimate Guide

TechSmith Camtasia

According to Dr. Michelle Pacansky-Brock , humanized online learning “supports the non-cognitive components of learning and creates a culture of possibility for more students.” Up until the early 2000s, course quality was determined by examining course content, pedagogy, and learning outcomes.

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