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Do You Need a CCO and CLO?

The Performance Improvement Blog

Should your organization have a CCO and CLO? Paul Hebert argues against organizations appointing a Chief Culture Officer. Hebert writes: …as soon as you codify, quantify and assign responsibility to something it ceases to be everyone’s responsibility…Culture is a defined as a set of shared values, behaviors, norms. I agree with Hebert and I have similar concerns with having a CLO (Chief Learning Officer). Leadership for culture and learning should come from CEOs.

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Tight Cultures and Loose Cultures

CLO Magazine

He knew it was critical for him to develop a trusting relationship with his potential partner. During many initial discussions and exchanges, he tried to gauge the extent to which this partner could be trusted to honestly follow through with commitments and promises. What was going on, and why are there similar stories regarding Americans trying to develop trusting relationships with Chinese individuals? Cultural Differences. Tight and Loose Cultures.

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Creating a Culture of Servant Leadership

CLO Magazine

Servant leadership is all about enriching the lives of others, building better organizations and ultimately creating a world that is more caring and equitable. When you describe your corporate culture, is being of service to one another and the community a core value? It is specifically good for business to practice servant leadership within your organization. Seven Pillars of Servant Leadership” by James W. Exhibiting compassion builds an environment of trust.

Want a more inclusive culture? Consider the power of peer leadership

CLO Magazine

Recently, I’ve seen firsthand how valuable peer leadership is to underrepresented employee groups, many of whom may feel isolated and uncertain right now. Other peer leaders I’ve met shared their experiences in more difficult work environments, ones in which peer leadership is absent.

Tight Cultures and Loose Cultures

CLO Magazine

He knew it was critical for him to develop a trusting relationship with his potential partner. During many initial discussions and exchanges, he tried to gauge the extent to which this partner could be trusted to honestly follow through with commitments and promises. What was going on, and why are there similar stories regarding Americans trying to develop trusting relationships with Chinese individuals? Cultural Differences. Tight and Loose Cultures.

Leadership in the Great Acceleration

CLO Magazine

We have been watching how the Great Acceleration is reshaping businesses and leadership. A bureaucratic structure and the command-and-control leadership style slowed down decision-making and innovation. A one-size-fits-all leadership approach really never worked.

Work, culture and COVID-19

CLO Magazine

The very real and immediate need to address the technological requirements of forced online work options grabs the attention, but finding IT solutions without addressing the cultural and emotional impact of COVID-19 on your employees is, at best, a half-baked quick fix.

Collaborative leadership: An antidote for a turbulent world

CLO Magazine

For several years now, many management authors have been discussing how the volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous world in which we live requires a new set of leadership skills. What is it about these two very different leadership styles that cause failure or success in turbulent times?

Practical leadership development principles for a COVID-19 world

CLO Magazine

You may or may not have the ability to invest in leadership development right now, yet your organization needs effective leaders to stay competitive in this season of volatility. Why have traditional leadership development programs failed? Develop leadership by doing leadership.

Effective Leadership is Transformational

CLO Magazine

Effective leadership is a transformational journey made up of four “spheres of influence.” These are self leadership, one-on-one leadership, team leadership and organizational leadership. The bull’s-eye in the middle — self leadership — is the heart of the four spheres. It comes first because effective leadership starts on the inside. The key to successful one-on-one leadership is the ability to develop a trusting relationship with another person.

Leadership in the time of Coronavirus

CLO Magazine

In the meantime, those of us involved in organizational and leadership development may find ourselves wondering how to intersect, in a meaningful way, with the emergency preparations going on in the businesses of the clients with whom we work. After all, training and development, culture change initiatives and succession planning understandably take a back seat as the business tries to figure out how it will maintain basic operations.

Company culture will never be the same: 5 ways to start rebuilding now

CLO Magazine

We all know that building the foundation for a positive and open workplace culture isn’t as easy as flipping a switch. And while working from home hasn’t completely derailed our efforts at building our culture, it has definitely taken them in a new direction. There is one thing I can say with certainty — no matter how great your culture was before the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s not going to be the same after. Evaluate Culture.

Leadership Traits That Transcend Gender

CLO Magazine

However, research shows that the small number of women who have risen to top positions in business often possess leadership traits quite different from those associated with successful men. Corporations of that era were characterized by top-down, command-and-control organizational cultures, and lines of reporting authority strongly mirrored those of the military. Our language is replete with phrases that reinforce the maleness of power and leadership.

Investment in leadership development continues to be critically important

CLO Magazine

The truth is that the topic might not be new, but investment in leadership development continues to be critically important — and the need to spread the word persists. Organizational success is driven by strong leadership, and companies that invest in leadership training consistently appear on most-admired and best-of lists. And yet, some companies still need to be convinced that leadership development relates directly to organizational success.

How Coaching Can Help the Majority Culture Understand Difference

CLO Magazine

Yet managers, often representatives of the dominant or “majority culture,” may not always feel comfortable or confident in addressing foreign national employees with regard to cultural disconnects. As Professor Erin Meyer put it : “Stereotyping people from different cultures on just one or two dimensions can lead to erroneous assumptions. His communication protocol, informed by home country cultural norms, did not align with that of the staff he was now managing.

CLO Podcast: Visa’s Karie Willyerd on Learning Strategy

CLO Magazine

She took on the brand new role of global CLO at Visa in 2018. It’s no secret that talent is at the center of the modern business agenda and it’s our hope that you’ll hear tips and ideas from this podcast that will help you succeed in business, whether you’re a long-time CLO with decades of experience, whether you aspire to the role in the future or maybe you’re just passionate about the future of learning in today’s organizations.

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Honest feedback plays a critical role in building cultural D&I

CLO Magazine

Competence hierarchies are formed as people rise in leadership ranks within organizations based on their competence to most effectively perform at the next level. The post Honest feedback plays a critical role in building cultural D&I appeared first on Chief Learning Officer - CLO Media.

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Reflecting on the evolving leadership landscape

CLO Magazine

The biggest change in leadership I see today compared with 40 years ago is the marked increase in servant leadership advocates and practitioners around the world. Top-down leadership is slowly but surely becoming a thing of the past. To me, a culture that serves both internal and external customers is essential for companies everywhere today — period. When leaders set the vision and direction for their organization, that is the leadership aspect of servant leadership.

Leadership Styles: One Size Does Not Fit All

CLO Magazine

When high performers move into leadership roles, one of the first choices they need to make is what kind of leader they want to be — and there are a lot of options to choose from. Others will lean toward transactional leadership, where delivering results is the measure of success. The truth is all leadership styles can be good choices — in the right situation. Leadership is much more complicated than that.”. Situational Leadership.

Listen: Discover Financial Services’ Jon Kaplan on tuition assistance programs and the importance of building trust among your learning team

CLO Magazine

In this episode of the Chief Learning Officer Podcast, Jon talks about that “crucible of leadership,” how he rebuilt himself and his team in the wake of his failure and how they came to establish the Discover College Commitment, an industry-leading tuition assistance program that all Discover employees are eligible for starting on their first day. Mike: We should also mention Liz Loutfi who also is one of our editorial team who works on CLO.

A Taste for Growth: CLO of the Year Rob Lauber

CLO Magazine

To solve Yum Brands’ challenges, CLO Rob Lauber has created a learning strategy that helps the business and employees grow, making him this year’s CLO of the Year. He has made programs more accessible through technology, more portable through field-based delivery and more globally consistent to reinforce the company’s culture. “He exemplifies leadership, is a good people leader and a good project leader. 2010-2013: Board member, Leadership Kentucky Inc.

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Organizations Don't Learn

The Performance Improvement Blog

The culture of most organizations prevents them from learning. A leader who is self-confident, trusting, and has a growth mindset, will put learning ahead of control and will encourage risk-taking for the sake of learning. Still another barrier to learning is the training culture of most organizations. A course on leadership, a workshop on listening skills, a seminar on ethics, or an elearning module on the latest project management software.

6 competencies leaders need to develop right now

CLO Magazine

Over this past year, there has been no shortage of content published on the importance of leadership qualities such as resilience, empathy and agility. There’s no team without trust.

Turning crisis into opportunity: Get perspective and lead together

CLO Magazine

This requires a particular approach to leadership. The Center for Creative Leadership defines leadership as a social process that enables people to work together as a cohesive group to produce collective results.

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3 C-Skills for the C-Suite

CLO Magazine

Here are three skills worth strengthening: Culture management: Toxic cultures don’t spring up out of nowhere. They’re often a by-product of how business leaders manage and express their priorities and behavior, and promote values like collaboration, continuous learning, risk taking, transparency and trust. Modern leaders have to be able to create culture, maintain it and grow it, said Mary-Anne Gillespie, president and founder of Red Apple Coaching.

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Developing the next generation of physician leaders

CLO Magazine

As the face of the health care industry continues to change, there is an overriding need for leaders who possess both clinical expertise and substantial leadership abilities. Regardless of the concepts that will or won’t affect us even a few years from now, one thing is certain: The degree of leadership complexity and knowledge will need to increase substantially over time. Leadership used to be about getting results, regardless of the way they were obtained.

There and Back Again: A Journey of Learning

CLO Magazine

She grew up during China’s Cultural Revolution and Mao Zedong’s Communist movement. “My If you think about the Chinese culture with such a deep, deep reverence for learning and for self-cultivation, having access to learning so limited it probably shaped this hunger in me all my life,” said Tsai, vice president of human resources-enterprise learning at the St. Leadership at the $13.5 Ecolab’s culture is also customer-focused, Tsai said.

Putting Into Practice What We Preach

CLO Magazine

In the practice of leadership and among firms there have been many books and much talk about various leadership styles, including authentic, collaborative or even inspirational leadership to name a few. All these make sense and have value as frameworks to define and develop one’s leadership approach, so I am going to introduce a simple and practical way that I think about leadership. Leadership Development leadership leadership development leadership style

Five Practices to Build Emotionally Intelligent Leaders

CLO Magazine

Emotional intelligence, or EQ, the capability of individuals to identify and manage their own emotions as well as recognize those of others, has been identified as a strong indicator and predictor of effective leadership. Goleman says “gifted leadership occurs where heart and head — feeling and thought — meet.” 2) Create a culture of compassion: Employees need to feel valued, appreciated and acknowledged for their contributions.

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Searching for a Higher Purpose

CLO Magazine

In 2009, she joined Fierce Conversations as an account executive/marketing lead, and as of November 2018, she was running the leadership development and training company that focuses on helping clients have effective conversations. While Fierce, a small, growing company, doesn’t have a formal leadership development program, Engle said company leaders and mentors taught her how the business works and gave her a sense of connection to the company.

Are You Developing Global Leaders?

CLO Magazine

To remain competitive in a global economy, organizations must determine the best way to position their business and people for success; that requires strong global leadership. Whether the organization is large or small, all companies are affected by global events and need leaders savvy in both business and cultural affairs. The Problem with Global Leadership. This next level leadership includes global strategic thinking, intellectual curiosity and strong self-awareness.

There’s No I in Team — Innovation, That Is

CLO Magazine

To help unlock innovation one must carefully examine the culture and leadership characteristics in cross-functional drug development teams. There is no shortage of literature devoted to leadership, culture and teamwork in the spirit of innovation. An April Harvard Business Review article highlighted the critical nature of leadership in shaping organizational culture and strengthening competitive advantage.

Inspirational leaders own their imperfection

CLO Magazine

How could I replicate leadership perfection when I was stumbling around, learning as I went? I’ve since concluded that leadership messes are actually better life lessons than successes. Everyone in your organization has formed opinions about your leadership style, your messes and your successes. By doing so, you create a culture that closes the great divide between leaders and individual producers. leader leadership making mistakes organizational leadership

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Re-entry in a recession

CLO Magazine

Following, let’s explore the key employee re-entry issues of inclusion, engagement and talent support and offer three pragmatic, culturally appropriate steps to ensure long-term development, inclusion and retention for organizations employing a diverse, multicultural workforce.

Mitigating the effects of implicit bias

CLO Magazine

This is the third and final article in a series exploring implicit bias by CLO contributor Michael Bret Hood. Preparing yourself and others to overcome these hidden biases is a difficult proposition, but one that must be addressed if you value organizational culture.

Working Arm in Arm

CLO Magazine

While AI has the capacity to transform work experiences for the better, it can also threaten the trust that underpins a healthy corporate culture and strong employee engagement. One of them is evaluating a project’s impact on the corporate culture, employee experience and, ultimately, employee engagement. Outside of the technological expertise it requires, the biggest obstacle to successfully implementing AI is trust. Stay attentive to trust.

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Digital Degrees and Flexibility

CLO Magazine

The nature of leadership skills is changing so quickly that a lot of organizations no longer believe traditional education can stay the pace,” said Michael Griffiths, lead for Deloitte’s Learning Consulting Practice in New York. There is a lot of unease about leadership and learning,” Griffiths said. Leadership and the Future of Work. That is causing them to change the way they think about leadership development and what benefits it brings to the organization.

Leading with unprecedented compassion during coronavirus

CLO Magazine

They need to trust that their leaders are beside them every step of the way. It’s been as much a learning experience for them as it has for our leadership team. What’s getting us through is a complete embrace of compassionate leadership. Key to compassionate leadership is being willing to adapt to external pressures facing our people and our business. This creates a culture of trust. Crisis Leadership compassion Coronavirus covid-19

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The 6 Skills Every Active Leader Needs

CLO Magazine

To keep up with a continually changing workplace, leaders need to be truly collaborative partners and realistically commit to building and promoting a learning culture. Key is to build a learning culture based on compassion and companionship. Trusted-Educator: An active leader is a trusted-educator who helps relationships focus on technology and critical thinking. A clear and dynamic vision becomes a part of the company culture and a way of company life.

The Weather Man

CLO Magazine

John Ogren, chief learning officer of the National Weather Service, believes leadership development should be offered early in everyone’s career. Over the next few years he slowly began to shift the learning culture in the organization, and to push learning beyond technical skills. If the CLO was truly a C-suite position, the leadership felt the role belonged at headquarters, he said. Leadership is a behavior, not a solution,” he said.

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