21 Kinds of Informal Learning at Work [Video]

Pract.us

But most of learning we do at work occurs informally, through interactions and experiences while we’re doing our jobs. Think about your day and everything you’ve learned so far. This video offers 21 different kinds of informal learning that we engage in every day. Take a look and see how much crucial learning you do outside the classroom. Experimentation is one of the best ways to learn. Apprentices learn as they work.

Why and How to Create a Continuous Learning Culture

Docebo

As the great Albert Einstein once said: “Once you stop learning, you start dying.”. When done exceptionally, continuous learning can foster talent that is constantly innovating, rethinking, and formulating new strategies to better your business. The implications of a stagnant learning culture can prove to be severe for the health and progress of an organization. What is continuous learning? Why you should look to foster a culture of continuous learning.

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Eight Leader Habits of a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

Eight leader habits are essential to a learning culture. These are behaviors ingrained in the routines and rituals of organizations that are continually learning and learning how to learn. Leaders in these organizations do the following: Send the message - Leaders communicate the importance of learning to the organization. Build trust - Employees will invest time and effort in learning if they trust their managers.

Informal Learning and the Pivot Point

The Performance Improvement Blog

As David Grebow explained in his post about The Learning Curve and The Pivot Point , unless formal training (courses, workshops, seminars, webinars, etc.) is followed by informal learning interventions, at the Pivot Point in the learning curve the knowledge and skills acquired in those formal experiences will not be applied and will be forgotten. This chart identifies only some of the many ways in which learning can be supported over time.

Getting Formal About Informal Learning

Litmos

My Internet Time Alliance colleague, Charles Jennings, pointed me to this interesting article by Andries De Grip, titled " The importance of informal learning at work" that has interesting implications for the design of learning experiences, particularly when employees are not desk-bound, and/or in high-turnover situations. The key is to get clear about what informal learning is, and more importantly how to (and not to) leverage it.

Time for a New Look at Learning: Or What I Learned from Reading “Informal Learning at Work”

Pract.us

Your team learns informally all the time. You can support those efforts for more learning bang for your buck. With a shift in your views about what learning is, you can still build a powerful learning organization and demonstrate the value to executives at the same time. A native of New Zealand, Paul Matthews has always applied the practical, no-nonsense approach he learned growing up on a farm to his work in the corporate world. Informal coaching.

Informal Learning – the other 80%

Jay Cross

The start-up stiffed me but the paper morphed into the Informal Learning book. I’ll be leading a series of master classes on informal learning and working smarter in Europe. Informal Learning – the other 80%. Employees and partners with more capacity to learn are more versatile in adapting to future conditions. Because organizations are oblivious to informal learning, they fail to invest in it. Learning is social.

Dealing with the Challenges of Guided Informal Learning

Pract.us

Colleagues learning and sharing ideas. Most business managers know intuitively that we learn our jobs by doing our jobs. Many companies, who’ve recognized this fact, have started to consider how they can harness learning by doing in their training programs. Some companies have taken a Guided Informal Learning approach, which helps them focus employee’s on-the-job training, encourage collaboration and track everyone’s progress. Learn about one here.)

9 Strategies to Encourage and Drive Informal Learning in a Remote Working Environment

EI Design

Humans learn a lot informally. In fact, this is a significant way how we learned as children. In this article, you will learn how to leverage informal learning in today’s remote working environment to drive creativity, innovation, and engagement.

Overcoming Fears to Embrace Informal Learning

Allego

In a previous post we took a closer look at thinking holistically about employee development and embracing the informal learning activities people not only prefer but seek out on their own. Any strategy that ignores this 90% of professional learning already taking place outside the confines of structured learning programs is missing a tremendous opportunity to elevate sales rep performance across the most critical metrics.

Closing the Learning-Acquisition Gap with Informal Learning

Learnkit

This is the same way lots of animals learn (bear with me – no pun intended). Wacky but completely true (there is a great article here if you are curious to learn more) – it also highlights well the connection between training and rewards. But this is a myopic view of things and it’s not exactly how we learn best. We aren’t pigeons and we can learn to do things in more way than one. Rolling out Informal Learning.

Promoting Informal Learning at the Workplace—Featuring 5 Examples

EI Design

In our early years, informal learning is the significant way we learn. In fact, we continue to learn through this approach even at the workplace. In spite of this, many people are skeptical about the impact of informal learning at the workplace. However, I believe that it should be part of the overall learning strategy as learners respond positively to it and organizations can easily provide support to promote it.

Promoting Informal Learning at the Workplace—Featuring 5 Examples

Adobe Captivate

In our early years, informal learning is the significant way we learn. In fact, we continue to learn through this approach even at the workplace. In spite of this, many people are skeptical about the impact of informal learning at the workplace. However, I believe that it should be part of the overall learning strategy as learners respond positively to it and organizations can easily provide support to promote it.

In Summary: E-Learning Trends for 2020

Docebo

Although we’re all still mourning the loss of summer, many of us are starting to prepare our learning strategies for the year ahead. As we move into 2020, we enter into a new era of e-learning, and we at Docebo have compiled all of the important e-learning trends set to impact the year ahead, so you can be ready. Here’s a summary of what you can expect in the full report: Learning Content. It’s up to learning technology providers to help organizations through this.

Informal Learning 2.0

Jay Cross

Published in Chief Learning Officer, August 2009. Informal Learning 2.0. Corporate approaches to learning have to change, as well. Until the shift from industrial to network dominance, corporations could compensate for crummy learning by hiring experienced people and managing ingenious command-and-control structures. Organizations that don’t learn can’t keep up. It’s learn or die. Increasing customer loyalty though learning.

How (and Why) You Should Promote Informal Learning with Trainees (and the Boss)

Mindflash

Do they learn more about their job from formal training (classroom, online, etc.) or do they learn more informally (from peers, managers, etc.)? You should find out, and here’s why: Informal learning accounts for over 75% of the learning taking place in organizations today. In the past many companies viewed informal learning as a negative reflection on their formal training programs. Promoting Informal Learning with Trainees.

Online Coaching

Tony Karrer

Catherine Lombardozzi recent post Coaching informal learning sparked something for me around online coaching opportunities. In prior posts she identifies the following elements as being needed for informal learning strategy to be effective in the workplace: Motivation for learning. I completely agree with Catherine that we need to be thinking about how learners can get support for dealing with the complexities of informal learning.

Learning & Development: How To Do It Right (2020 Update)

Docebo

With high stakes riding on the success of our training and development strategies, it’s time for us to unpack the importance of polished learning programs and, even more crucially, better understand how our training programs have failed in the past. By reflecting on Learning and Development (L&D) as a whole and the strategies we know don’t work, we can rewrite our approach to talent management. What is Learning and Development? Why Is Learning and Development Important?

Why Investing In Informal Learning Makes Sense: Featuring 6 Examples Or Approaches

Adobe Captivate

Informal learning is integral to the way we learn, but organizations have several associated concerns about its value and impact. In this article, I address them and—through 6 informal learning examples— I also show you how you can use informal learning effectively. 6 Reasons Why Investing In Informal Learning Makes Sense. The fact that learning happens through multiple channels (and not just formal training) is an established one.

6 Steps To Creating Learning Ecosystems (And Why You Should Bother)

Learnnovators

70:20:10 has shone a spotlight on the limits of formal learning. In contrast, social and experiential learning continue to be veritable goldmines of productivity, placing learners at the centre of their story and demanding a major shift from Learning & Development professionals. Central to this cultural shift is the understanding that learning happens by learners, not to them. That’s where learning ecosystems come in.

Improving Informal Learning

Big Dog, Little Dog

Harold notes the 80-20 funding ratio between formal and informal learning and Will Thalheimer questions this funding differential in the comment section. That is, 20% of the learning in organizations is formal, while 80% is informal; however, organizations spend 80% on formal learning and only 20% on informal, thus it looks something like this: Chart 1. Our time is better spent with the formal part of learning. What did we learn?

Sahana Chattopadhyay – Crystal Balling with Learnnovators

Learnnovators

ABOUT SAHANA CHATTOPADHYAY (Social Learning & Collaboration Strategist, Performance Consultant Exploring Emergent Learning, Blogger). Sahana Chattopadhyay is a performance consultant and an L&D professional with 15 years of experience in the field of academia and organizational learning. Her passion is to help organizations become learning organizations through social and collaborative learning. The focus must be on people, mindset and culture.

PKM 158

Action on Informal Learning - Leads to Great Questions

Tony Karrer

Great post by Ray Sims - What To Do On Behalf of Informal Learning? He provides a list of things he can do to help informal learning in his organization. A few that jump out at me: Help employees discover and refine their own personal learning environment Improve content findability. Funding for information and research services, conference attendance, guest speakers at company events, etc. Considering what a "learning coach” might look like.

Isn’t this how organizational learning cultures progress?

Jay Cross

Jane Hart’s post yesterday on The differences between learning in an e-business and learning in a social business got me thinking about the evolution of learning culture in organizations. It’s all to0 easy to mistakenly think of formal learning as the antiquated, primitive way of doing things, something an organization shucks off as it becomes enlightened and gives its people the autonomy to work on their own.

CONNIE MALAMED – CRYSTAL BALLING WITH LEARNNOVATORS

Learnnovators

ABOUT CONNIE MALAMED (Learning, Information Design and Visual Communication Consultant, Author, Presenter): Connie Malamed is a learning, information design and visual communication consultant. She is the publisher of The eLearning Coach, The eLearning Coach Podcast and the Instructional Design Guru mobile app. Connie is the author of Visual Language for Designers and is currently writing a visual design book for learning designers.

No-Nonsense Employee Training: The Best Articles of This Week

Pract.us

We all know that what got you promoted isn’t what will make you successful as a manager, so it’s important to learn what can trip you up. At Pract.us, we help you get the most of your training dollar by making formal and informal learning stick. Learn more. News coaching Employee engagement learning culture managementWe find the best articles for helping you create a robust training program that gets results.

Integrating Social Learning In The Workplace

Learnnovators

I have been writing about social learning and its related concepts – communities of practices , working out loud and skills for the networked world for quite some time now. Social learning has become a buzzword in the workplace learning space, and every other organization is claiming to have “social learning” as a part of the mix. The catch is that “social learning” cannot just be implemented or enforced. How is this change related to social learning?

eLearning Modules will Die… and 70:20:10 will hold the Smoking Gun

Learnnovators

When talking about technology and learning it’s hard not to think about elearning modules. They’ve been the bread and butter of digital learning solutions for decades and the industry behind them has helped many, including myself, feed our families. Many in L&D have embraced the fact that formal learning doesn’t do the heavy lifting in learning, but let’s not swing the pendulum too far because formal learning still has an important role to play.

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How to Evaluate Learning: The Kirkpatrick Model for the 21st Century

Dashe & Thomson

Recent research by ASTD and REED Learning indicates that the top skills desired by Learning & Development departments are measuring and evaluating training. Even though many Learning and Development organizations find it a challenge to prove training’s effect beyond how learners react to the training and whether they have learned the training content, senior management and business stakeholders are more and more interested in metrics that show the impact on the organization.

No-Nonsense Employee Training: The Best Articles of This Week

Pract.us

A 2×2 Matrix to Help You Prioritize the Skills to Learn Right Now. Many business leaders recognize the importance of employees who can learn and adapt to new technologies, and there’s no shortage of topics to focus your development efforts on. This article has a quick matrix to help you decide what to learn when. It could even help you determine your learning curriculum for your team. Neuroscience Principles for Coaches. Learn more.

Brain 90

MOOCs In Workplace Learning – Part 2: Designing a MOOC

Learnnovators

@ ignatia (Inge de Waard) describes MOOCs thus in her Master’s Thesis: “MOOC is above all referring to a pedagogical model with independent learners, access to information, opportunity to create emerging, spontaneous, yet not directed learning communities, etcetera. Corporate Learning will be transformed and will take on more importance wrote Josh Bersin in his HR predictions for 2015. There is an urgent need to re-imagine workplace learning for the networked world.

7 Strategies to Facilitate “Working Out Loud”

Learnnovators

Community members learn together, share feedback, take onus of building the domain. Talented coders and developers come together to learn, share and co-create. If we critically examine the characteristics of networked learning, it becomes evident that these are also qualities that foster and enable communities to thrive which in turn pull creative, passionate individuals to the workforce. We all know that true learning takes place through dialogues.

LearnTrends: Reinventing Organizational Learning

Experiencing eLearning

These are my live blogged notes from Jay Cross & Clark Quinn’s LearnTrends session on Reinventing Organizational Learning. Article they wrote for CLO mag: “Become a Chief Meta-Learning Officer&#. If you don’t know the solution & need to network/collaborate to find it, that’s learning. Internet Learning Alliance: They were all working independently, decided to work together and practice what they preach. Broaden definition of learning.

INTEGRATING SOCIAL LEARNING IN THE WORKPLACE

Learnnovators

I have been writing about social learning and its related concepts – communities of practices , working out loud and skills for the networked world for quite some time now. Social learning has become a buzzword in the workplace learning space, and every other organization is claiming to have “social learning” as a part of the mix. The catch is that “social learning” cannot just be implemented or enforced. How is this change related to social learning?

MOOCS IN WORKPLACE LEARNING – PART 2: DESIGNING A MOOC

Learnnovators

@ ignatia (Inge de Waard) describes MOOCs thus in her Master’s Thesis: “MOOC is above all referring to a pedagogical model with independent learners, access to information, opportunity to create emerging, spontaneous, yet not directed learning communities, etcetera. Corporate Learning will be transformed and will take on more importance wrote Josh Bersin in his HR predictions for 2015. There is an urgent need to re-imagine workplace learning for the networked world.

The 70:20:10 Model – Today, Tomorrow & Beyond

Learnnovators

ABOUT CHARLES JENNINGS (Managing Director, Duntroon Associates): Charles Jennings is a leading thinker, practitioner and consultant in the areas of performance improvement, change management, and learning. From 2002 until the end of 2008, Charles was the Chief Learning Officer for Reuters and Thomson Reuters where he had responsibility for developing the global learning and performance strategy and leading the learning organisation for the firm’s 55,000 workforce.

THE 70:20:10 MODEL – TODAY, TOMORROW & BEYOND

Learnnovators

ABOUT CHARLES JENNINGS (Managing Director, Duntroon Associates): Charles Jennings is a leading thinker, practitioner and consultant in the areas of performance improvement, change management, and learning. From 2002 until the end of 2008, Charles was the Chief Learning Officer for Reuters and Thomson Reuters where he had responsibility for developing the global learning and performance strategy and leading the learning organisation for the firm’s 55,000 workforce.