Democratization of Organizational Learning

The Performance Improvement Blog

Organizational learning has, for too long, been owned by consultants and chief training and learning officers. Any effort to learn how to improve leadership, management, team building, communication, planning, or other organizational skills, has started with these external and internal gatekeepers. This has made learning generally inaccessible to the people with the greatest need. . This is why Jim Stilwell and I have created Learning to be Great tm.

LearnTrends: Reinventing Organizational Learning

Experiencing eLearning

These are my live blogged notes from Jay Cross & Clark Quinn’s LearnTrends session on Reinventing Organizational Learning. Article they wrote for CLO mag: “Become a Chief Meta-Learning Officer&#. If you don’t know the solution & need to network/collaborate to find it, that’s learning. Internet Learning Alliance: They were all working independently, decided to work together and practice what they preach. improve learning process.

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10 Principles of Organizational Learning DNA

The Performance Improvement Blog

How do we know if an organization has the “DNA” that predisposes it to organizational learning? Gary Neilson and Jaime Estupinan have been studying and writing about "organizational DNA" for the past 10 years. They explain the term this way: We use the term organizational DNA as a metaphor for the underlying organizational and cultural design factors that define an organization’s personality and determine whether it is strong or weak in executing strategy.

Force Field Analysis of Organizational Learning

The Performance Improvement Blog

learning) and the factors that block people from achieving that change. The table below lists forces that commonly drive learning in organizations and the factors that block learning in organizations. Work vs. Learning. The usefulness of this force-field analysis of organizational learning is in stimulating action to add and enhance the factors that drive learning and stimulating action to eliminate and reduce the factors that block learning.

Why Evaluate Executive Coaching

The Performance Improvement Blog

Executive coaching has quickly become a nearly two billion dollar industry. Many companies now rely on coaching for the development of their leaders. Having a coach, once perceived as an admission of failure, is now perceived as a normal part of managing large, complex organizations. And coaching has also become common for entrepreneurs who need help transitioning from leader of a start-up to manager of a rapidly growing company. How did she work with the coach?

L&D Professionals: From Trainer to Learning Coach

The Performance Improvement Blog

The most important role of L&D professionals is to coach managers in facilitating learning in organizations. The days of instructor-centered employee learning are over. globalization, workforce diversity, hyper-competition, and demands of a new generation of workers make continuous learning the core activity of organizations today. Companies can no longer depend on L&D departments (and serendipity) to meet the evolving learning needs of employees.

Coaching to Learn; Learning to Coach

The Performance Improvement Blog

Do you want employees to learn? Do you want them to transfer that learning to the workplace and apply that learning to achieve business goals? Then develop manager-employee relationships that are supportive of learning. From all we know about learning in the workplace it is clear that managers and employees must be allied around learning. According to Roesler, A productive manager-employee coaching relationship includes these elements: Self-Direction.

Keep Growing Your Organizational Learning Pyramid

CLO Magazine

An Inclusive Learning Growth Pyramid. Some organizations provide myriad opportunities for learning at different levels of the organizational pyramid. An inclusive learning pyramid would help employees at every level to learn the relevant skills and grow to the next level. Careers are no longer narrowly defined by jobs and skills but through experiences and learning agility.”. Onboarding forms the base of the inclusive learning growth pyramid.

16 Signs of a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

How do you know your organization has a learning culture ? How will people be learning? While a learning culture is an environment that’s always being developed, certain signs indicate that you are making progress. In a learning culture…. Leaders are communicating the importance of learning (acquiring new knowledge, skills, and capabilities) and holding managers accountable for learning and applying that learning to making a difference for the organization.

Megan Torrance Talks About Learning in Organizations

The Performance Improvement Blog

I’m always looking for examples of companies that put learning ahead of training. They design custom learning experiences for client organizations by starting with the intended results and related performance problems and then, and only then, do they provide employees with the tools, structures, and processes to learn what they need to know and do to be successful. . One is the key role of managers in learning. The second insight is “collaborative learning”.

Training Culture vs. Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

What’s the difference between a “training culture” and a “ learning culture ”? As the chart shows, in a training culture, responsibility for employee learning resides with instructors and training managers. In that kind of culture the assumption is that trainers (under the direction of a CLO) drive learning. Whereas in a learning culture, responsibility for learning resides with each employee and each team.

Isn’t this how organizational learning cultures progress?

Jay Cross

Jane Hart’s post yesterday on The differences between learning in an e-business and learning in a social business got me thinking about the evolution of learning culture in organizations. It’s all to0 easy to mistakenly think of formal learning as the antiquated, primitive way of doing things, something an organization shucks off as it becomes enlightened and gives its people the autonomy to work on their own.

Manager Engagement in Employee Learning: More Work or More Reward?

The Performance Improvement Blog

I was asked during my recent ASTD Webcast whether there’s data to show that managers, who are more involved in training and learning, ultimately receive more rewards and recognition than those who aren''t. While I’m not aware of research that ties training-involved managers with their own success in companies, I am aware of very successful companies who value highly the role of managers in training and learning and recognize and reward that involvement.

Active and Passive Learning in Organizations

The Performance Improvement Blog

Many of the typical methods of learning in the workplace make the learner a passive recipient of knowledge and skills. In this role, employees (as individuals, teams, or the organization as a whole) receive feedback about what they are doing and how they are doing it and, through individual and collective reflection, learn how to make themselves, their teams, and the enterprise more effective. She includes: Company training (face-to-face workshops and e-learning).

Manager's Role in Learning and Performance Improvement

The Performance Improvement Blog

What should be a manager’s role in employee learning? In answering this question, the first thing managers have to understand is that continuous learning is the modus operandi for all high performance organizations. Individual, team, and enterprise performance can’t improve without learning. Learning isn’t in addition to a manager’s job; it IS a manager’s job. An engineer in a prototype department of a manufacturer learns how to operate a 3D printer.

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A Year of “The Performance Improvement Blog” in Review

The Performance Improvement Blog

The topics ranged from creating a learning culture to increasing employee engagement to improving organizational communication to evaluating executive coaching, and more. Here are the links with a short excerpt from each post: How to Create a Learning Culture in Organizations - Organizational learning is not about training. Unfortunately, we don’t know much about the impact of coaching.

Do You Have a Learning Culture? (Part One)

The Performance Improvement Blog

Culture used to be considered a byproduct of organizational life. So, how do you know what kind of culture you have and, if you want to create a learning culture, how do you know when you have one? Taking a cue from Shah, here are some espoused values (not necessarily values in use) and instinctive reactions that indicate either the presence or absence of a learning culture. Both reactions are reasonable, but one is indicative of a learning culture and the other is not.

Managing the Self-Directed Learner

The Performance Improvement Blog

Plugging in to what she needed to learn was as direct and fast as the screenwriters could imagine…. In a managing minds company, it is critical that employees take responsibility for their own learning, pulling the information they need when and where they need it. Self-directed learners are people who get intrinsic rewards from their ability to locate, curate, share, and communicate what they have learned independently. Hire for ability and motivation to learn.

PwC Canada Strives for a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

If you’re looking for examples of companies that are striving to create and sustain a learning culture, PwC ( PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP) of Canada should be on your list. I recently had the pleasure of speaking about the importance of a learning culture to the Edmonton meeting of The Conference Board of Canada’s Council for Learning and Leadership Development. Incorporating structured learning routines into our working practices (e.g.

Reasons Why You Need to Create a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

I have argued in previous blog posts that organizations need a learning culture because training is not sufficient to develop the necessary competencies of 21rst century workers. For one thing, the learning from training events is often not transferred to the workplace. Also, formal training cannot be responsive to the kind of learning agility that is needed in the high tech, competitive world that we live in today.

What Can Managers Do to Create and Sustain Learning?

The Performance Improvement Blog

Managers in any organization, whether nonprofit, government, or business, play a pivotal role in creating and sustaining learning. However, they do have to believe that people can learn and change, they have to care about their own learning, and they have to value the development of the people they supervise. If they have these beliefs and values, then managers can contribute significantly to learning in their organizations.

Creating a Culture for Learning

The Performance Improvement Blog

A company managing minds maintains a culture in which learning how to learn is valued and accepted, and the pursuit of learning is woven into the fabric of organi­zational life. How do you know if your organization has the DNA that predisposes it to learning? Gary Neilson and Jaime Estupiñán have been studying and writing about organizational DNA for the past 10 years. Learning is aligned with results. Organizational structure facilitates learning.

Stop Training Leaders and Start Developing Leadership

The Performance Improvement Blog

[This post first appeared on the Learning to be Great Blog.]. According to the authors, to create this learning culture, share responsibility so that employees can experience risk-taking. Accept failure, as long as it results in learning and performance improvement. Encourage strategic leaders to learn from each other. Coaching Employee Engagement Leadership Leadership Development Learning Culture Organization Culture Organizational Learning Teamwork Training

Imagine a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

Imagine a company that, in the face of unprecedented change, is continually learning how to learn fast: managing tremendous amounts of information; creating new products and processes in response to global competition; using new apps to be more efficient and effective; and being responsive to learning preferences of a multi-generational and diverse workforce. Imagine a company in which employees are hired because they are excited about learning and improving themselves.

Eight Leader Habits of a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

Eight leader habits are essential to a learning culture. These are behaviors ingrained in the routines and rituals of organizations that are continually learning and learning how to learn. Leaders in these organizations do the following: Send the message - Leaders communicate the importance of learning to the organization. Build trust - Employees will invest time and effort in learning if they trust their managers. This learning cannot be left to chance.

Beyond Training: Three Models

The Performance Improvement Blog

Organizational learning is so much more than training. Three models of learning convey the breadth of options that, depending on what an employee needs to learn, are more effective, cheaper, and easier to implement than formal training programs. One of these models I call “50 Ways to Lever Learning.” This list fits into the push vs. pull model of learning in organizations. Another model is what Bersin by Deloitte calls the “Learning Technology Stack.”

Key Elements of a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

A “learning culture” is a community of workers continuously and collectively seeking performance improvement through new knowledge, new skills, and new applications of knowledge and skills to achieve the goals of the organization. A learning culture is a culture of inquiry; an environment in which employees feel safe asking tough questions about the purpose and quality of what they are doing for customers, themselves, and other stakeholders.

Creating a Culture for Learning

The Performance Improvement Blog

A company managing minds maintains a culture in which learning how to learn is valued and accepted, and the pursuit of learning is woven into the fabric of organi­zational life. How do you know if your organization has the DNA that predisposes it to learning? Gary Neilson and Jaime Estupiñán have been studying and writing about organizational DNA for the past 10 years. Learning is aligned with results. Organizational structure facilitates learning.

The Power of Beliefs

The Performance Improvement Blog

If you want a culture in which employees are learning, developing, and contributing to the organization’s success, you need to address the beliefs that they carry in their heads, and whether, according to Chris Argyris , their espoused theory (what they say they believe) and their theory-in-use (beliefs that direct actual behavior) are congruent. We know from the research of Carol Dweck that what people believe about learning can have a profound effect on employee development.

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Leaders Learning about Learning

The Performance Improvement Blog

I explained the limitations of formal training and the need for taking an organizational learning perspective. I argued that in order for any kind of learning intervention (training, coaching, mentoring, action learning, etc.) to have a positive impact on achieving the organization’s goals, managers had to take an active role in supporting learning. They wanted to know specifically what they could do to facilitate learning.

Learning in a Managing Minds Company

The Performance Improvement Blog

The future of how we learn in our organizations is a popular topic. But unless you are responsible for developing, delivering, managing, and measuring training and learning, keeping up with the latest learning technologies can be overwhelming. The training and learning technology discussions miss the point. Our approach is to suggest new ways of facilitating learning that fit into managing minds. Learning independently. Learning interactively.

Learning in a Managing Minds Company

The Performance Improvement Blog

The future of how we learn in our organizations is a popular topic. But unless you are responsible for developing, delivering, managing, and measuring training and learning, keeping up with the latest learning technologies can be overwhelming. The training and learning technology discussions miss the point. Our approach is to suggest new ways of facilitating learning that fit into managing minds. Learning independently. Learning interactively.

You want coaching? You got it!

Limestone Learning

CEO of Glass of Learning , Nancy Priest, CTDP. There’s big demand for coaching these days. When you spend your time and energy coaching others, it’s important to know how to give yourself a training boost, and then use those skills in your practice. That’s where The Institute for Performance and Learning comes in with a much-requested coaching session—and the first IPL event of 2017. Join speaker Nancy Priest for Actionable Conversations – Micro Coaching.

Managing the Self-Directed Learner

The Performance Improvement Blog

Plugging in to what she needed to learn was as direct and fast as the screenwriters could imagine…. In a managing minds company, it is critical that employees take responsibility for their own learning, pulling the information they need when and where they need it. Self-directed learners are people who get intrinsic rewards from their ability to locate, curate, share, and communicate what they have learned independently. Hire for ability and motivation to learn.

Do You Have a Learning Culture? (Part Two)

The Performance Improvement Blog

In "Part One" of this post, I presented some situations in which espoused values (not necessarily values in use) play a role and examples of instinctive reactions that indicate either the presence or absence of a learning culture. . What did you learn from trying to build the app? What did you learn about developing new products, about collaboration, and about yourself? Both reactions are reasonable, but one is indicative of a learning culture and the other is not.

The Performance Management Myth

The Performance Improvement Blog

In an article for T+D titled, A Closer Look: Myths vs. Reality in Training , Pat Galagan presents a number of provocative challenges to popular assumptions about training and learning. I’ve written previously about the importance of creating a learning culture in organizations. Performance management systems that are based on the talent-is-fixed belief are a barrier to creating a learning culture.

Informal Learning and the Pivot Point

The Performance Improvement Blog

As David Grebow explained in his post about The Learning Curve and The Pivot Point , unless formal training (courses, workshops, seminars, webinars, etc.) is followed by informal learning interventions, at the Pivot Point in the learning curve the knowledge and skills acquired in those formal experiences will not be applied and will be forgotten. This chart identifies only some of the many ways in which learning can be supported over time.

A Manager's View of Employee Learning

The Performance Improvement Blog

Having retired from the auto industry, he is now an executive coach focused on improving Emotional Intelligence (EQ) in leaders. I love the sense of understanding, enthusiasm and acceptance the leadership team conveys here regarding their role in learning. As you might expect, based on my input to a previous blog (3/25, Training Isn’t Learning ), I was delighted to see the emphasis on the necessary role of the manager!

This Is What I Believe About Learning in Organizations

The Performance Improvement Blog

The Purpose of Business is Learning. But none of this is possible without learning. At its core, any high performing organization is about learning; continually using new information to become smarter, better, and more effective. To survive and thrive today, industries need innovation which is essentially about learning. Companies must learn more deeply about their customers and markets. Training Is Not Learning. Work is No Longer Work .

DevLearn - Google Wave - Organizational Learning - Best of eLearning Learning

eLearning Learning Posts

Best of eLearning Learning. Social Learning for Management Development: Introducing CoachingOurselves. Put your learners on a diet - consider a pull-based learning approach - Free as in Freedom , November 6, 2009. Blogs – Day 1 – An Introduction - Engaged Learning , November 9, 2009. Open source e-learning development 11: Moodle - The E-Learning Curve , November 9, 2009. Interested in Creating an Alternative Reality Games (ARG) for learning?