From novice to expert

Learning with 'e's

a student cohort) can be extended by encouraging them to scaffold weaker, or less expert learners, to encourage and lead, in a kind of cognitive apprenticeship. Subsequent work on the theory has revealed that cognitive tools (learning with, rather than through technology) can be applied to amplify the ''situatedness'' of learning, by providing active, engaging contexts. Anderson ACT-R Cognitive Architecture 2. Festinger Cognitive Dissonance Theory 12. Unported License.

Memory full

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The work of John Sweller and Nillie Lavie on Cognitive Load Theory and Capacity Theory (based on studies by Shalom Fisch ) is useful to help us understand how to optimise digital design environments such as the layout of virtual learning environments or online discussion groups. What exactly can Cognitive Load Theory do to help us to optimise students'' memories? To understand Cognitive Load Theory, we first need to revisit Working Memory (WM). Unported License.

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Learning, making and powerful ideas

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The Theory Not to be confused with constructivism, constructionism is a cognitive theory that relates to learning by making things. They represent the essence of rational thinking, developing cognitive skills that will prepare the child to deal with a multitude of challenges and problems they may encounter later in life. Anderson ACT-R Cognitive Architecture 2. Festinger Cognitive Dissonance Theory 12. Unported License.

Ideas 56

Conflict resolution

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In this post, we continue to explore Festinger''s work, this time focusing on his theory of cognitive dissonance. Festinger called this phenomenon cognitive dissonance. Cognitive dissonance is essentially a theory of motivation through conflict resolution. As Kendra Cherry argues: "Cognitive dissonance plays a role in many value judgements, decisions and evaluations. This results in disappointment, which can be described as a form of cognitive dissonance.

Stage by stage

Learning with 'e's

Psychologists and cognitive scientists have offered a number of useful theories that aid our understanding of learning. In this post we examine one of the most influential theories of the 20th Century - the stages of cognitive development model proposed by Jean Piaget. He proposed several influential ideas about how as they grow, children pass through several stages of cognitive growth. Anderson ACT-R Cognitive Architecture 2. Festinger Cognitive Dissonance Theory 12.

Deeper learning

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Craik and Lockhart claimed that the deeper the processing, the stronger will be the trace of that memory, and thus recall will take less cognitive effort. This framework for human memory research is considered by many cognitive psychologists to be a stronger explanation than those of the multi-store memory models. It has also influenced other recently proposed cognitive processing theories including spreading activation theory and neural network theory. Unported License.

Mind technology

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The tools I use are a kind of mind technology, a means of extending my cognitive capabilities, enhancing my thinking, memory and recall. It would take me a lot longer though, and I would have to divert more cognitive energy away from the core stuff. These tools are indeed cognitive technologies - mind tools that help us to learn new things, to seek out new ideas and new concepts, to boldly take us - who knows where? Unported License.

The shape of minds to come

Learning with 'e's

She made some important contributions to his stages of cognitive development theory (which will be featured in greater depth in some upcoming articles on this blog). It could be argued that these decisions were made because of Inhelder and Piaget''s cognitive stages theory. Are there actually stages of cognitive development, and are they as Inhelder and Piaget claimed? Unported License. This is number 17 in my series on learning theories.

Words in mind

Learning with 'e's

Psychologists and cognitive scientists have offered a number of useful theories that aid our understanding of learning. The last post in this series featured the stages of cognitive development model proposed by Jean Piaget. In this post I examine a cognitive theory - spreading activation theory - adapted from a hierarchical model of memory proposed by Ross Quillian and Allan Collins. Anderson ACT-R Cognitive Architecture 2. Festinger Cognitive Dissonance Theory 12.

Get it together

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Let''s start with some theory: According to the revised Bloom''s cognitive taxonomy by Anderson and Krathwohl, ''creating'' is suggested as the peak of achievement. This is a fairly low level cognitive process, but it does require some discernment and decision making ability. Photo by Julia Frost Get it together by Steve Wheeler is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Thinking, language and memory

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Photo by Anders Sandberg on Flickr Thinking, language and memory by Steve Wheeler is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. constructivism Culture early childhood education higher order cognitive skills language learning memory Technology tool use Vygotsky ZPD I''ve had several conversations with my students in the past few weeks about how Vygotskiian theory informs our understanding of learning.

A steep learning curve

Learning with 'e's

Previous posts in this series: Anderson ACT-R Cognitive Architecture Argyris Double Loop Learning Bandura Social Learning Theory Bruner Scaffolding Theory Craik and Lockhart Levels of Processing Csíkszentmihályi Flow Theory Dewey Experiential Learning Engeström Activity Theory Photo by ericd on Wikimedia Commons A steep learning curve Steve Wheeler is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Just an illusion?

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I took them on a brief tour of cognitive processes, including the human senses, memory and recall, and the representation of reality through perception. I showed how these processes connect up into cognitive architectures, through an analysis of the biological, psychological and physiological. Photo by Ian Stannard Just an illusion? by Steve Wheeler is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Smart learning

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Photo by Joaquim F. Silva Smart learning by Steve Wheeler is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. distributed cognition learning future 3D visualisationI spend most of my time in the future, but I do go home at weekends. At least, that is my explanation about why I am so fascinated with the future. I always have been, ever since I was a little boy and started reading science fiction novels.

The shape of minds to come

Learning with 'e's

She made some important contributions to his stages of cognitive development theory (which will be featured in greater depth in some upcoming articles on this blog). It could be argued that these decisions were made because of Inhelder and Piaget's cognitive stages theory. Are there actually stages of cognitive development, and are they as Inhelder and Piaget claimed? Unported License. Image by Steve Wheeler This is number 17 in my series on learning theories.

DR. STELLA LEE – CRYSTAL BALLING WITH LEARNNOVATORS

Learnnovators

These chatbots can be integrated into a company’s intranet, Learning Management Systems (LMS), smart phones, stand-alone devices, and even everyday appliances (it could even be the photo copiers in your office!). STELLA LEE - CRYSTAL BALLING WITH LEARNNOVATORS.

Constructing learning in the digital age

Learning with 'e's

From a cognitive constructivist perspective, learning is achieved through the twin processes of assimilation and accommodation. The latter implies that new learning is 'bolted onto', or constructed within, existing cognitive structures known as schemas. Photo by Till Krech on Wikimedia Commons Constructing learning in the digital age by Steve Wheeler was written in Plymouth, England and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0

#BrainTime 1: Well I never

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Photo from Needpix This is the first in the #BrainTime series on the effects of time on the human mind. Cognitive scientists now believe that déjà vu may be caused by our processes of perception, cognition and memory. Unported License.

Any computer that can be replaced by a teacher, should be

Learning with 'e's

Photo by Steve Wheeler Here's my opinion, for what it's worth. Even cognitive computing has been developed to mimic human decision making and other natural characteristics of being human. Any computer that can be replaced by a teacher, should be by Steve Wheeler was written in Auckland, New Zealand and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Spaced Repetition Apps Are the New 3×5: Futuristic Flashcards and Microlearning

Grovo

One Anki user studies “photos of important business contacts, with prompts to recall the person’s name and some personal information,” Shellenbarger wrote. Many benefits of microlearning exist in flashcards: the light cognitive load, the greater retention of visual material than auditory material, the custom training content. Photo credit: “ Japanese Flashcards ” by Konrad Lawson is licensed under CC BY 2.0.

Grovo 100

Passing of the year

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Salomon, an educational psychologist from Israel, was interested in studying the effects of technology on cognition and learning. Perhaps his greatest contribution to our knowledge about educational technology came in the form of his theory of transfer of learning (a theory that can be applied to learning through problem solving), but he also did extensive work into the optimal design of cognitive tools and learning environments. Unported License.

Oculus Rift Is Going To Be Awesome for Enterprise Training

Grovo

Grovo solves for that by training in micro, which presents learners with content that demands very little cognitive work and very little time. Photo credit: “ Orlovsky and Oculus Rift ” by Sergey Galyonkin is licensed under CC BY 2.0. Expectations have been running high for consumerized virtual reality since Facebook purchased Oculus VR, the most futuristic-sounding company in the world, in March 2014.

Many pathways

Learning with 'e's

In my most recent post I examined Leon Festinger''s cognitive dissonance theory and its applications to education. Unported License. This is number 12 in my series of short posts on learning theories. I''m working through the alphabet of psychologists and provide a brief overview of each theory, and how it can be applied in education. In this post, we explore the work of Howard Gardner, known universally as Multiple Intelligences Theory.

Who's in charge?

Learning with 'e's

Anderson ACT-R Cognitive Architecture 2. Festinger Cognitive Dissonance Theory 12. Piaget Cognitive Stages of Development 34. Quillian and Collins Spreading Activation Theory Photo by NEC Corporation on Flickr Who's in charge? by Steve Wheeler was written in Plymouth, England and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. This is number 35 in my ongoing series on learning theories.

Self fulfilling prophecies

Learning with 'e's

Anderson ACT-R Cognitive Architecture 2. Festinger Cognitive Dissonance Theory 12. Piaget Cognitive Stages of Development 34. Rotter Locus of Control Photo by Dhillan Chandramowli on Flickr Self fulfilling prophecies by Steve Wheeler was written in Plymouth, England and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. This is number 36 in my continuing series of blog posts about learning theories.

6. Frankenstein's well-meaning monster

Learning with 'e's

Photo from Wikimedia Commons What's that coming over the hill? Granted, in 'Frankenstein', Hollywood created a ripping gothic yarn that capitalised on the horror factor, and yes, the photo from the film is iconic (probably Karloff's greatest moment), but it's hardly faithful to the original texts. In school, the attitude of teachers can influence a child's cognitive and social development. Unported License. Is it a monster?

Movie 29

The height of SAMR

Learning with 'e's

A key stage in any successful technology integration is to ensure that the affordances of new technologies are exploited by students for authentic learning outcomes and leveraged to be extensions of their natural cognitive and physical capabilities. Photo by Jim Cianca on Wikimedia Commons The height of SAMR by Steve Wheeler is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Learning as dialogue

Learning with 'e's

Later, Piaget, Inhelder and others were responsible for introducing a cognitive version of learning theory which held that children were ''solo scientists'' who constructed their own meaning through exploration of their environment. This prompted new approaches in schools that included discovery learning and progressive curricula that neatly reflected Piaget''s stages of cognitive development model. Unported License.

Activity learning

Learning with 'e's

plans, cognitive maps) to achieve their goals. Photo by Artaxerxes on Wikimedia Commons Graphic by Steve Wheeler Previous posts in this series: Anderson ACT-R Cognitive Architecture Argyris Double Loop Learning Bandura Social Learning Theory Bruner Scaffolding Theory Craik and Lockhart Levels of Processing Csíkszentmihályi Flow Theory Dewey Experiential Learning Activity learning Steve Wheeler is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0

Through a child's eyes

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Research from the behavioural and cognitive sciences, neurosciences and pedagogical research fields is regularly yielding new findings. In an article entitled 'Learning from Learners', Rachel Wu (Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at the University of Rochester, New York) discusses some recent findings on how infants learn. Photo by Ashrei Halom Through a child's eyes by Steve Wheeler is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0

Lightbulb moments

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Anderson ACT-R Cognitive Architecture 2. Festinger Cognitive Dissonance Theory 12. Koffka Gestalt theory Photo by Alan Cleaver Lightbulb moments by Steve Wheeler is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. We reach number 21 in this series on learning theories. I''m working through the alphabet of psychologists and theorists, providing a brief overview of each theory, and how it can be applied in education.

Memories are made of this

Learning with 'e's

We start off with some useful ideas around proposed cognitive architectures - how we image human memory is organised. Dual Coding Model Canadian cognitive psychologist Allan Paivio will probably be remember most for his work on Dual Coding Theory. Working Memory Model Both Paivio and Baddeley saw the importance of identifying different kinds of memory and how they can be represented within cognition. Unported License. Memory is very important.

Joining the dots

Learning with 'e's

Anderson ACT-R Cognitive Architecture 2. Festinger Cognitive Dissonance Theory 12. Jahoda Ideal Mental Health Photo by Clemens Koppensteiner Joining the dots by Steve Wheeler is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. This is number 20 in my series on learning theories.

Authentic learning

Learning with 'e's

Most people learn best by being "with it," yet school makes them identify their personal, cognitive growth with elaborate planning and manipulation.' Brown, Collins and Duguid (1989) agree, believing that authentic learning contexts are vitally important if students are to acquire and develop cognitive skills that are transferable to real world living. 1989) Situated cognition and the culture of learning. Unported License.

Our digital future 9: Omni-choice learning

Learning with 'e's

Photo by Loewe Technologies on unsplash There's plenty of hype about artificial intelligence (AI) and its potential, future impact on society. Next time on Our Digital Future - 10: Cognitive courseware. 6: Home learning 7: Work 8: Artificial Intelligence Our digital future: Omni-choice learning by Steve Wheeler was written in Plymouth, England and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Behave yourself

Learning with 'e's

Anderson ACT-R Cognitive Architecture 2. Festinger Cognitive Dissonance Theory 12. Jung Archetypes and Synchronicity Photo from Wikimedia Commons Behave yourself by Steve Wheeler is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. This is number 19 in my series on learning theories.

The point of no return

Learning with 'e's

Transformative learning is found in the struggle to make sense of chaos, in the churn of the unfamiliar, and in the cognitive dissonance of doubt. Anderson ACT-R Cognitive Architecture 2. Festinger Cognitive Dissonance Theory 12. Maslow Hierarchy of Human Needs Photo by Sid Mosdell on Flickr The point of no return by Steve Wheeler is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

The future of intelligence

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Futurologist Ray Kurzweil's argument looks beyond these issues, holding that the tools we have available to us as a result of networked social media and personal devices, actually enable us to increase our cognitive abilities. He argues that we are becoming more creative and have the potential for endless cognitive gain as a result of increased access to these technologies. Unported License. This is the third in a series of blog posts on the future of learning and technology.

Excavating knowledge

Learning with 'e's

Photo by Steve Wheeler Theories of learning can be useful in helping us to understand the possibilities of learning, and also to guide teachers in their pedagogical practice. From this 'cognitive constructivist' perspective, learning is achieved through the twin processes of assimilation and accommodation. The latter implies that new learning is 'bolted onto', or constructed within, existing cognitive structures known as schemas. Unported License.

The AfL truth about assessment

Learning with 'e's

Shouldn''t curricula and assessment (especially the high stakes kind) now focus more on the kinds of knowledge and cognitive skills students need to survive and thrive in an information rich world? Photo from Wikimedia Commons by Hariadhi Who put the ass in assessment? by Steve Wheeler is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.