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Words in mind

Learning with 'e's

Psychologists and cognitive scientists have offered a number of useful theories that aid our understanding of learning. The last post in this series featured the stages of cognitive development model proposed by Jean Piaget. In this post I examine a cognitive theory - spreading activation theory - adapted from a hierarchical model of memory proposed by Ross Quillian and Allan Collins. Anderson ACT-R Cognitive Architecture 2. Festinger Cognitive Dissonance Theory 12.

Who's in charge?

Learning with 'e's

Anderson ACT-R Cognitive Architecture 2. Festinger Cognitive Dissonance Theory 12. Jung Archetypes and Synchronicity 19. Piaget Cognitive Stages of Development 34. Quillian and Collins Spreading Activation Theory Photo by NEC Corporation on Flickr Who's in charge? attribution theory education Julian Rotter learning locus of control pedagogy Psychology self-efficacy student centred learning teaching theory

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eXSpace exploration

Learning with 'e's

The ability to interact directly with the thinking of others by creating one's own content alongside existing content, merging, comparing and contrasting and even overwriting, is a complex process that can support advanced levels of cognition and problem solving. Simply being exposed to the use of new technologies may promote some innovative thinking about alternative pedagogies.

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Strictly for adults?

Learning with 'e's

Anderson ACT-R Cognitive Architecture 2. Festinger Cognitive Dissonance Theory 12. Jung Archetypes and Synchronicity 19. Kolb Experiential Learning Cycle Photo by Norwood Adult Services on Wikimedia Commons Strictly for adults? adult andragogy child education learning Malcolm Knowles pedagogy theory This is number 23 in my series on learning theories.

Here comes the SAMR

Learning with 'e's

Technology integration results in digital tools being embedded into learning, so that for example maker cultures emerge, or the classroom activities are flipped , supporting more effective pedagogies and improving student learning outcomes. This was far from a genuine integration of technology into the learning process, and it led to little or no change in pedagogy, and an inertia that prevented transformation.

How to Effectively Shift to Online Teaching: The Ultimate Guide

TechSmith Camtasia

Synchronous vs. asynchronous learning – What makes a quality online course? According to Dr. Michelle Pacansky-Brock , humanized online learning “supports the non-cognitive components of learning and creates a culture of possibility for more students.”

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