PLN or CoP?

Learning with 'e's

That''s quite an apt result because Google and many of the other large, supposedly ''free'' social media tools are very much focused on making money to sustain their operations. Nor is it about the morality of social media companies. In the context of this post, PLN stands for Personal Learning Network , and CoP stands for Communities of Practice. A quick search reveals that not a lot has been written about the juxtaposition of the two.

Digital learning in organisations

Learning with 'e's

I have been busy writing a new book, and the last month has involved a lot of research and writing, completing, editing and polishing of my manuscript for final submission later this month. It was about time I tackled another sector of learning and I have become very familiar with leaning and development in organisations over the last decade. The title of the book is 'Digital Learning in Organisations', and is already being marketed on Amazon and other online outlets.

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Is all learning social?

Learning with 'e's

Just about every day I find myself embroiled in a discussions about fundamentals of learning, the nature of knowledge and the processes of education. It comes with the territory of working as an academic in a university, and I expect to do it much of the time. In the post I made the remark that today's learning needs to be personal, social and global, all of which can be mediated through technology. This is known as the zone of proximal development (ZPD).

Cammy Beans Learning Visions: Defining an e-Learning Strategy: Planning the Kickoff

Learning Visions

Thursday, June 14, 2007 Defining an e-Learning Strategy: Planning the Kickoff In the spirit of building a Community of Practice -- sharing ideas and processes -- I thought Id try and share what I can of a current project. Ive done a lot of e-Learning projects, created a lot of courses, but this is the first time that Ive been a part of the strategy itself. I did a lot of research in preparing our proposal and making our sales call.

Networked pedagogy

Learning with 'e's

New theories for the networked, digital age, emerging cultures of learning and a hyper-connected and networked society. Differentials between academic practices, and the variety of roles we adopt within communities of practice and learning. The impact of traditional education on contemporary pedagogical practices. Chaos and uncertainty versus knowing and order, and the educational impact of rhizomatic approaches to learning.

Two innovations that have changed learning forever

Learning with 'e's

On the face of it, this could be quite a difficult question to answer, simply because I have been involved in the study of educational technology since 1976, almost 40 years. During that time I have seen a great number of innovations. The extent of change that has occurred in this period was quite astounding. I witnessed the development of video cassette tapes, CD-ROMs, personal computers in the 70s and 80s but this was just the start.

Four Ways to Rethink Employee On-Boarding

Mindflash

Now more than ever, it’s critical for learning professionals to address the incredible costs of high employee turnover. First, let me show you some statistics : 25 percent of Fortune 500 managers change jobs each year. 22 percent of staff turnover occurs in the first 45 days of employment. 46 percent of rookies wash out in the first 18 months (per Leadership IQ). Just do a Google search for on-boarding , and you’ll find plenty of ideas.

5 of the best

Learning with 'e's

I find it useful to look back to see what were the most popular blog posts of the previous year. In retrospect, trends are more observable than they are when you're in the thick of it. My learning definitions series #learningis (13 posts) proved to be popular with a combined hit count of almost 50,000 views. It kicked off after I watched a video of some teachers at Geelong College in Australia, talking about their definitions of learning.

The first technology

Learning with 'e's

I have been working in the field of learning technologies for almost 40 years. In fact my specialism never ceases to amaze me, because there is always something new to learn, some new technology, app or software tool that is emerging, or some new theory or model that is being proposed. One of the biggest surprises for me has happened in the last decade or so. We are always building on the previous work of others, and we should never forget this.

Making connections

Learning with 'e's

One major phenomenon of the last decade has undoubtedly been the global and exponential rise of social media. Seeded at the turn of the century, the social web phase of Internet development promoted connections, participation, networked sociality. It didn''t take long for the emerging social networking services to gain massive worldwide subscriptions. To be able to connect to others and to share ideas and content instantly, caught the imagination of many.

Taking up residence

Learning with 'e's

David White , who is at Oxford University, is probably best known for his theory of Digital Residents and Visitors. Along with Alison Le Cornu, White published an article in 2011 that countered the Digital Natives and Immigrants ideas of Marc Prensky. Unfortunately, the genie was now out of the bottle, and people believe what they want to believe. White''s argument of Residents and Visitors is therefore a very welcome and timely alternative perspective.

Seriously.

Learning with 'e's

I used April Fool''s day to explore many of the issues that confront educational bloggers. Challenging as it may be to sustain writing at a high level of quality (most of us don''t succeed!), the rewards are that your ideas are quickly ''out there'' in public, and can be discussed, built upon, challenged and otherwise explored by your professional peers, your community of practice. It''s not always a bed of roses.

Our digital future 4: Pervasive computing

Learning with 'e's

Participants can join in and leave at any time, as the rolling programme of keynotes, discussions, panels and seminars/workshops plays out in real time on screen. It was a distinct honour to be invited to keynote, and I spoke on one of my favourite (and probably most dangerous) of topics - the future of education. In the 1990s we witnessed the rise of the Internet and the rapid proliferation of web based content.

Learning, making and powerful ideas

Learning with 'e's

I''m working through the alphabet of psychologists and theorists, providing a brief overview of each theory, and how it can be applied in education. My last post explored Donald Norman''s ideas around perception and the design of every day objects. In this post, the work of Seymour Papert will feature, especially his work on learning through making, also known as constructionism. By contrast, when a child learns to program, the process of learning is transformed.

Ideas 56

Next generation learning

Learning with 'e's

In my previous blog post, the architecture of learning , I outlined some of the key characteristics of learning in a digital age, and started to identify some of the main differences between Learning 1.0 In the summary of the article, I suggested that the distinct differences between the two types of learning are mostly based on how learners are changing the ways they interact, and their increased ability to create, share and organise their own learning.

Stage by stage

Learning with 'e's

Psychologists and cognitive scientists have offered a number of useful theories that aid our understanding of learning. In this series I''m providing a brief overview of the theories, and how each can be applied in education. My last post explored the work of Allan Paivio and his theory of dual coding. In this post we examine one of the most influential theories of the 20th Century - the stages of cognitive development model proposed by Jean Piaget.

Learning is changing

Learning with 'e's

What we learn in formalised settings such as school, college and university is merely the foundation of our knowledge and the rudimentary skill sets that enable us to build our own minds and construct meaning, through individual and social contexts later in life. That has always been the nature of learning. Libraries and 'seats of learning' were traditionally the places to be when formal learning was required. Around this time many new disciplines began to emerge.

Synching feelings

Learning with e's

A lot of time has been spent studying the impact of user generated content. Some of the best content is often provided by amateurs - people who are not necessarily specialists or qualified in their field of interest, but who are never the less passionate about their subject. This is also the ethos of sites such as Wikipedia, which rely heavily on 'the people' and 'wisdom of crowds' to create and maintain the content held in its pages.

Shifting sands

Learning with 'e's

Although it is very difficult to predict the future, we are aware of the trends and can use these to detect where we may be heading, and that may take us in one or more directions, hence the plurality of ''futures''. Technology is one of the major drivers of change in our society , and it is easy to see where this is being integrated into schools, colleges and universities. Mostly it is integrated into classrooms, but it is largely left out of most curricula.

Mapping mobile learning

Learning with 'e's

I have previously written on this blog about how mobile technology can give the edge and also about some of the social implications of learning on the move. All we needed was to reach a point in society where a critical mass of users was reached. That occurred in my estimation somewhere around 2010, and growth of ownership has been exponential since. That critical mass of users has driven a number of changes, including innovations in design of hardware and software.

Reach out and connect

Learning with e's

One of the digital literacies I identified in yesterday's blogpost was effective social networking. Most of us have a Facebook account, and maybe a LinkedIn account too. Lots of us use Twitter, and some of those out on the periphery may still be using Myspace or Bebo. If I am illiterate (in the sense of reading and writing), I cannot read the signs or engage with text - I am not able to fully participate within my culture.

Windmills on the mind

Learning with e's

The dust has settled over the Bazaar 'Show that You Share' conference held this week at the University of Utrecht, Netherlands, and it's all been a bit of a whirl, so now I have some time to reflect, here are some of my thoughts on the proceedings: On the theme of social software, managing digital identities is a concern, with personal content on the web being both an asset and a liability.

Everyone's a critic

Learning with 'e's

Many students fail to realise their full potential when it comes to essay writing, usually because they can't seem to find their way out of the descriptive cul-de-sac they make for themselves. Knowing your field of study is also an important factor in academic writing, and some students simply don't trawl deeply enough. Knowledge of your field is not enough though. It is a kind of conversation the reader has with the author. Everyone's a critic, they say.

Top 10 eLearning Predictions 2011 #LCBQ

Tony Karrer

Lots of discussion and debate around interesting questions for eLearning professionals. We would welcome lots of discussion. Situated learning (learning within context in a community of practice) grows thanks to augmented mobile reality. Of course, you can’t look at learning in 2011 without mentioning mobile learning. Analytics will be the buzzphrase of the year. Mobile learning sub-disciplines will begin to emerge.

Global digital tribe

Learning with 'e's

If you are immersed in technology mediated communication, there are no apparent barriers to membership of your community of practice. It is your virtual community. It is tribal because the global online community exhibits many of the characteristics of traditional, territorial tribal practice. Whether or not we realise it, if we regularly use social media, we are members of the world wide digital tribe.

Tracking sentiments

Learning with 'e's

Along with my fellow passengers I dutifully stood, waiting at the carousel, watching as bags and cases of all sizes, shapes and colours processed slowly by. Decreasing numbers of passenger waited with me as one by one, they spotted their bags, grabbed them and made off to find their transport. She asked for the name of my hotel and told me it would be delivered directly to my room. I stopped short of purchasing an expensive new suit.

Track 48

eLearning 101: How to Make an eLearning Course (Updated!)

OpenSesame

We’re here to unlock the language and techniques of online learning for beginners. Since the late ‘90s, SCORM has been the software standard of choice to ensure that any elearning course will play on any learning management system. That brings us to our second piece of key vocabulary: What is a learning management system? Not yet in wide use, it’s still wise to learn about XAPI to make sure you’re ready to stay on top of emerging technology.

Cammy Beans Learning Visions: Brent Schlenker: Marketers and Game Developers Know More About Learning Than We Do!

Learning Visions

hosted by Training Magazine Network. ** Disclaimers: “I am not a marketer or a game developer.&# (Although he plays a LOT of games). How do we use new and emerging technologies in the learning space? Point of today’s conversation: talking training, design and development if a marketing person were doing it. We bow to the will of the SME… Little room for creativity New technology gives us new tools. Common Craft Videos Great at explaining.

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