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Networked pedagogy

Learning with 'e's

New theories for the networked, digital age, emerging cultures of learning and a hyper-connected and networked society. Differentials between academic practices, and the variety of roles we adopt within communities of practice and learning. The impact of traditional education on contemporary pedagogical practices. The future of education and the potential impact of new and emerging technologies.

PLN or CoP?

Learning with 'e's

That''s quite an apt result because Google and many of the other large, supposedly ''free'' social media tools are very much focused on making money to sustain their operations. Nor is it about the morality of social media companies. In the context of this post, PLN stands for Personal Learning Network , and CoP stands for Communities of Practice. A quick search reveals that not a lot has been written about the juxtaposition of the two.

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Digital learning in organisations

Learning with 'e's

I have been busy writing a new book, and the last month has involved a lot of research and writing, completing, editing and polishing of my manuscript for final submission later this month. It was about time I tackled another sector of learning and I have become very familiar with leaning and development in organisations over the last decade. The title of the book is 'Digital Learning in Organisations', and is already being marketed on Amazon and other online outlets.

Is all learning social?

Learning with 'e's

Just about every day I find myself embroiled in a discussions about fundamentals of learning, the nature of knowledge and the processes of education. It comes with the territory of working as an academic in a university, and I expect to do it much of the time. In the post I made the remark that today's learning needs to be personal, social and global, all of which can be mediated through technology. This is known as the zone of proximal development (ZPD).

Cammy Beans Learning Visions: Defining an e-Learning Strategy: Planning the Kickoff

Learning Visions

Thursday, June 14, 2007 Defining an e-Learning Strategy: Planning the Kickoff In the spirit of building a Community of Practice -- sharing ideas and processes -- I thought Id try and share what I can of a current project. Ive done a lot of e-Learning projects, created a lot of courses, but this is the first time that Ive been a part of the strategy itself. I did a lot of research in preparing our proposal and making our sales call.

Two innovations that have changed learning forever

Learning with 'e's

On the face of it, this could be quite a difficult question to answer, simply because I have been involved in the study of educational technology since 1976, almost 40 years. During that time I have seen a great number of innovations. The extent of change that has occurred in this period was quite astounding. I witnessed the development of video cassette tapes, CD-ROMs, personal computers in the 70s and 80s but this was just the start.

Cammy Beans Learning Visions: Brent Schlenker: Marketers and Game Developers Know More About Learning Than We Do!

Learning Visions

hosted by Training Magazine Network. ** Disclaimers: “I am not a marketer or a game developer.&# (Although he plays a LOT of games). How do we use new and emerging technologies in the learning space? Point of today’s conversation: talking training, design and development if a marketing person were doing it. We bow to the will of the SME… Little room for creativity New technology gives us new tools. But creativity !=

Market 100

Making connections

Learning with 'e's

One major phenomenon of the last decade has undoubtedly been the global and exponential rise of social media. Seeded at the turn of the century, the social web phase of Internet development promoted connections, participation, networked sociality. It didn''t take long for the emerging social networking services to gain massive worldwide subscriptions. We are no longer in the age of isolation.

Taking up residence

Learning with 'e's

David White , who is at Oxford University, is probably best known for his theory of Digital Residents and Visitors. Along with Alison Le Cornu, White published an article in 2011 that countered the Digital Natives and Immigrants ideas of Marc Prensky. Unfortunately, the genie was now out of the bottle, and people believe what they want to believe. White''s argument of Residents and Visitors is therefore a very welcome and timely alternative perspective.

Next generation learning

Learning with 'e's

In my previous blog post, the architecture of learning , I outlined some of the key characteristics of learning in a digital age, and started to identify some of the main differences between Learning 1.0 In the summary of the article, I suggested that the distinct differences between the two types of learning are mostly based on how learners are changing the ways they interact, and their increased ability to create, share and organise their own learning.

Reach out and connect

Learning with e's

One of the digital literacies I identified in yesterday's blogpost was effective social networking. Most of us have a Facebook account, and maybe a LinkedIn account too. Lots of us use Twitter, and some of those out on the periphery may still be using Myspace or Bebo. What else do we need to learn about social networking that can help us or our students to learn better? Wendy Earle's 2005 discussion on the nature of literacies is a useful starting point.

Our digital future 4: Pervasive computing

Learning with 'e's

Participants can join in and leave at any time, as the rolling programme of keynotes, discussions, panels and seminars/workshops plays out in real time on screen. It was a distinct honour to be invited to keynote, and I spoke on one of my favourite (and probably most dangerous) of topics - the future of education. In the 1990s we witnessed the rise of the Internet and the rapid proliferation of web based content.

Mapping mobile learning

Learning with 'e's

I have previously written on this blog about how mobile technology can give the edge and also about some of the social implications of learning on the move. All we needed was to reach a point in society where a critical mass of users was reached. That occurred in my estimation somewhere around 2010, and growth of ownership has been exponential since. That critical mass of users has driven a number of changes, including innovations in design of hardware and software.

Windmills on the mind

Learning with e's

The dust has settled over the Bazaar 'Show that You Share' conference held this week at the University of Utrecht, Netherlands, and it's all been a bit of a whirl, so now I have some time to reflect, here are some of my thoughts on the proceedings: On the theme of social software, managing digital identities is a concern, with personal content on the web being both an asset and a liability.

Top 10 eLearning Predictions 2011 #LCBQ

Tony Karrer

Lots of discussion and debate around interesting questions for eLearning professionals. We would welcome lots of discussion. Situated learning (learning within context in a community of practice) grows thanks to augmented mobile reality. Of course, you can’t look at learning in 2011 without mentioning mobile learning. Analytics will be the buzzphrase of the year. Mobile learning sub-disciplines will begin to emerge.

Global digital tribe

Learning with 'e's

If you are immersed in technology mediated communication, there are no apparent barriers to membership of your community of practice. It is your personal network. It is your virtual community. It is tribal because the global online community exhibits many of the characteristics of traditional, territorial tribal practice. Industrial society eroded the tribal gatherings of more primitive societies and redefined community.