Supporting online learners

Learning with 'e's

If you're new to online teaching, or are revisiting it, do consider spending an hour of your time to browse through the ideas in this module. There is a quiz and a range of activities.

From novice to expert

Learning with 'e's

This is number 24 in my series on learning theories. I''m working through the alphabet of psychologists and theorists, providing a brief overview of each theory, and how it can be applied in education. The last post highlighted issues around the andragogy theory of Malcolm Knowles. In this post, we review the situated learning theory of Jean Lave. The notion of legitimate peripheral participation could be easily applied to online learning.

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Is all learning social?

Learning with 'e's

Just about every day I find myself embroiled in a discussions about fundamentals of learning, the nature of knowledge and the processes of education. It comes with the territory of working as an academic in a university, and I expect to do it much of the time. In the post I made the remark that today's learning needs to be personal, social and global, all of which can be mediated through technology. This is known as the zone of proximal development (ZPD).

PLN or CoP?

Learning with 'e's

That''s quite an apt result because Google and many of the other large, supposedly ''free'' social media tools are very much focused on making money to sustain their operations. Nor is it about the morality of social media companies. In the context of this post, PLN stands for Personal Learning Network , and CoP stands for Communities of Practice. A quick search reveals that not a lot has been written about the juxtaposition of the two.

Knowledge, practice and community

Learning with 'e's

After a break from blogging during the summer break, I''m back, and here is the continuation of my series on theories of learning, with number 25. You may recall that I''m working through the alphabet of psychologists and theorists, providing a brief overview of each theory, and how it can be applied in education. The previous post highlighted issues around the situated learning theory of Jean Lave. Bandura Social Learning Theory 4.

Content is a tyrant.

Learning with 'e's

The imminent arrival of widespread 4G broadband and LTE ( Long Term Evolution ) will usher in wider availability to information and push even more data to our mobile devices over the same amount of radio spectrum. But in adopting these communication advances, are we also opening the door for a deluge of content? Are we not already swamped by a tsunami of content? Knowledge comes about through learning and through the diligent application of information.

The importance of being networked

Learning with 'e's

In yesterday's blogpost Separation and connection I talked about the nature of social media and their capability to amplify human contact. One of the key reasons educators need a PLN is to keep in touch, to maintain dialogue with their community of practice. Never before have there been so many opportunities to make contact with educators world wide, many of whom have wonderful creative ideas to share. our use of social media actually engages.'

Cammy Beans Learning Visions: Defining an e-Learning Strategy: Planning the Kickoff

Learning Visions

Thursday, June 14, 2007 Defining an e-Learning Strategy: Planning the Kickoff In the spirit of building a Community of Practice -- sharing ideas and processes -- I thought Id try and share what I can of a current project. Ive done a lot of e-Learning projects, created a lot of courses, but this is the first time that Ive been a part of the strategy itself. I did a lot of research in preparing our proposal and making our sales call.

Theories for the digital age: Self regulated learning

Learning with 'e's

Informal and self regulated learning are defining characteristics of 21 st Century education. Various commentators suggest that as much as seventy percent of learning occurs outside of formal educational settings (Cofer, 2000; Dobbs, 2000; Cross, 2006). One challenge for education providers is to decide whether they will support the desire of students to self regulate their learning activities using personal technologies. Practice Application Brief No.

Who's in charge?

Learning with 'e's

This is number 35 in my ongoing series on learning theories. In this series I have been providing a brief overview of each theory, and how each can be applied in education. The most recent post in this series featured spreading activation theory - a theory adapted from a hierarchical model of memory proposed by Ross Quillian and Allan Collins. In this post, I present a brief overview of Julian Rotter's locus of control theory.

Our mutual friends

Learning with 'e's

This is number 28 in my series on learning theories. I''m gradually working through the alphabet of psychologists and theorists, providing a brief overview of each theory, and how it can be applied in education. My most recent post explored Jack Merizow''s Transformative Learning theory. In this post, I will examine Stanley Milgram''s concept of Six Degrees of Separation. The Theory You are at a party, and begin conversing with another guest.

Learning, making and powerful ideas

Learning with 'e's

This is number 31 in my series on learning theories. I''m working through the alphabet of psychologists and theorists, providing a brief overview of each theory, and how it can be applied in education. My last post explored Donald Norman''s ideas around perception and the design of every day objects. In this post, the work of Seymour Papert will feature, especially his work on learning through making, also known as constructionism.

Ideas 58

Stage by stage

Learning with 'e's

This is number 33 in my series on learning theories. Psychologists and cognitive scientists have offered a number of useful theories that aid our understanding of learning. In this series I''m providing a brief overview of the theories, and how each can be applied in education. My last post explored the work of Allan Paivio and his theory of dual coding. The Theory Jean Piaget was interested in how children develop their thinking.

In two minds

Learning with 'e's

This is number 32 in my series on learning theories. Psychologists and cognitive scientists have offered a number of useful theories that aid our understanding of learning. In this series I''m providing a brief overview of each theory, and how each can be applied in education. My last post explored the work of Seymour Papert and his theory of learning by making , also known as constructionism. Bandura Social Learning Theory 4.

I Believe in the Importance of a Personal Learning Network

Tom Spiglanin

I hadn’t yet recognized the value of connectedness , but knew immediately that I was learning from each of these encounters. I had more than a dozen individuals I interacted with regularly, and we would discuss thoughts, ideas, and plans related to one or more aspects of learning and development. Much of what I found I now consider useless or completely wrong. A community of practice is a group of people who share a profession or field of practice.

Words in mind

Learning with 'e's

This is number 34 in my learning theories series. Psychologists and cognitive scientists have offered a number of useful theories that aid our understanding of learning. In this series I have been providing a brief overview of each theory, and how each can be applied in education. The last post in this series featured the stages of cognitive development model proposed by Jean Piaget. All of these methods have elements of spreading activation.

Networked pedagogy

Learning with 'e's

New theories for the networked, digital age, emerging cultures of learning and a hyper-connected and networked society. Differentials between academic practices, and the variety of roles we adopt within communities of practice and learning. The impact of traditional education on contemporary pedagogical practices. Chaos and uncertainty versus knowing and order, and the educational impact of rhizomatic approaches to learning.

Self fulfilling prophecies

Learning with 'e's

This is number 36 in my continuing series of blog posts about learning theories. Psychology has contributed much to our understanding of how people learn, and listed alphabetically below are all of the previous theories I have featured in this series. My most recent post featured locus of control theory, and today's post is about the Pygmalion Effect in education. Bandura Social Learning Theory 4. Bruner Scaffolding Theory 5.

Going the extra mile

Learning with 'e's

This is number 26 in my series on learning theories. I''m working through the alphabet of psychologists and theorists, providing a brief overview of each theory, and how it can be applied in education. The previous post highlighted issues around the theory of Communities of Practice, from the work of Jean Lave and Etienne Wenger. The theory has a basic element of all teacher education for several decades.

Instagram, WhatsApp and Learning

Learning with 'e's

In a recently published article, my colleagues Maged Boulos, Dean Giustini and I write about how learning through social media is transforming medical practices, health care and education. Learning is essentially a social activity, where people scaffold and extend each other’s knowledge gain [ 54 ], but in recent years, new theories have emerged to explain distributed forms of learning that have been made possible through mobile technology and social media.

The point of no return

Learning with 'e's

This is number 27 in my series on learning theories. I''m working through the alphabet of psychologists and theorists, providing a brief overview of each theory, and how it can be applied in education. The previous post featured Abraham Maslow''s Hierarchy of Human Needs. In this post, I will examine Jack Merizow''s Transformative Learning theory. The Theory When we learn something new, we alter the structure of our brains.

Learning as dialogue

Learning with 'e's

Many of the earlier learning theories place the learner in splendid isolation. From the neo-behaviourist theories of Thorndike, Watson and Skinner, we were led to believe that learners respond to stimuli and make associations between the two, and that these links represent learning. This prompted new approaches in schools that included discovery learning and progressive curricula that neatly reflected Piaget''s stages of cognitive development model.

Taking up residence

Learning with 'e's

David White , who is at Oxford University, is probably best known for his theory of Digital Residents and Visitors. Along with Alison Le Cornu, White published an article in 2011 that countered the Digital Natives and Immigrants ideas of Marc Prensky. Prensky''s Natives and Immigrants was a popular theory within the education world a decade ago, but upon close examination it turned out to be fraught with difficulties and flaws. Such is the volatile nature of the Web.

Design for life

Learning with 'e's

This is number 30 in my series on learning theories. I''m working through the alphabet of psychologists and theorists, providing a brief overview of each theory, and how it can be applied in education. In this post, I explore Donald Norman''s ideas around the design of every day objects. This should not so much be considered as a theory, but is a useful perspective on design and human perception. 1990) The Design of Everyday Things.

Personalised learning

Learning with e's

Last night, during a panel discussion for the Plymouth Education Society, I made a statement that the current UK National Curriculum doesn't make a lot of room for personalised learning. I quoted Ken Robinson who has claimed that the current model of school is based on an industrialised or 'factory' model, where children are 'processed in batches' according to their year groups. Many schools practice assessment of learning using a criterion referenced assessment.

Shocking behaviour

Learning with 'e's

This is number 29 in my series on learning theories. I''m working through the alphabet of psychologists and theorists, providing a brief overview of each theory, and how it can be applied in education. My most recent post examined Stanley Milgram''s concept of Six Degrees of Separation. Another of Milgram''s experiments led to a theory of compliance, more generally referred to as obedience to authority. Bruner Scaffolding Theory 5.

Making the future of education

Learning with 'e's

The methods we use to try to align school and university teaching with the demands of contemporary society will shape the extent to which we succeed. Some advocate the flipped learning approach and to a certain extent, the transfer of content delivery from the classroom to the home (or elsewhere) makes a lot of sense. A lot of institutions are adopting versions of this method, and are employing technology, particularly video and online content to achieve it.

Content creation

Learning with e's

One of the most important digital literacies students require today is the ability to create appropriate content. Content creation is an important feature in many personal learning environment (PLE) models, and together with organising and sharing, makes up the cardinal triumvirate of skills that provides learners with a clear advantage. If you subscribe to constructivist theories of learning, you will understand why the creation of content is important in any context.

The first technology

Learning with 'e's

I have been working in the field of learning technologies for almost 40 years. In fact my specialism never ceases to amaze me, because there is always something new to learn, some new technology, app or software tool that is emerging, or some new theory or model that is being proposed. One of the biggest surprises for me has happened in the last decade or so. We are always building on the previous work of others, and we should never forget this.

Going the extra mile

Learning with 'e's

Photo by Steve Wheeler This is number 26 in my series on learning theories. I'm working through the alphabet of psychologists and theorists, providing a brief overview of each theory, and how it can be applied in education. The previous post highlighted issues around the theory of Communities of Practice, from the work of Jean Lave and Etienne Wenger. Most versions of Maslow's Hierarchy are represented as pyramids.

Bear pit pedagogy

Learning with 'e's

In other words, we enable digital and physical learning spaces in which they can freely explore ideas, argue with each other (and us) over concepts and theories and in so doing, develop their reasoning and thinking skills. They must also investigate theories critically, because if they simply accept a theory as 'truth', they may be leading their entire classroom down a blind alley.

Shifting sands

Learning with 'e's

Although it is very difficult to predict the future, we are aware of the trends and can use these to detect where we may be heading, and that may take us in one or more directions, hence the plurality of ''futures''. Technology is one of the major drivers of change in our society , and it is easy to see where this is being integrated into schools, colleges and universities. Mostly it is integrated into classrooms, but it is largely left out of most curricula.

Everyone's a critic

Learning with 'e's

Many students fail to realise their full potential when it comes to essay writing, usually because they can't seem to find their way out of the descriptive cul-de-sac they make for themselves. Knowing your field of study is also an important factor in academic writing, and some students simply don't trawl deeply enough. Knowledge of your field is not enough though. It is a kind of conversation the reader has with the author. Everyone's a critic, they say.

Top 10 eLearning Predictions 2011 #LCBQ

Tony Karrer

Lots of discussion and debate around interesting questions for eLearning professionals. We would welcome lots of discussion. Situated learning (learning within context in a community of practice) grows thanks to augmented mobile reality. Of course, you can’t look at learning in 2011 without mentioning mobile learning. Analytics will be the buzzphrase of the year. Mobile learning development for tablets will become one of these sub-disciplines.

Cammy Beans Learning Visions: Instructional Designers with Degrees: Survey Update

Learning Visions

About 27% of instructional designers have an advanced degree in ID. And 73% of us dont. Only 11% of instructional designers without an ID degree have reported that they were denied work due to the lack thereof. As reported earlier , there continues to be a wide range of backgrounds for IDers, mostly in the liberal arts. I have questions: Is this a good representation of the field in general? I focused on Communities of Practice and learned quite a bit.

Survey 100

Cammy Beans Learning Visions: Brent Schlenker: Marketers and Game Developers Know More About Learning Than We Do!

Learning Visions

hosted by Training Magazine Network. ** Disclaimers: “I am not a marketer or a game developer.&# (Although he plays a LOT of games). Point of today’s conversation: talking training, design and development if a marketing person were doing it. We bow to the will of the SME… Little room for creativity New technology gives us new tools. That’s where most creative talent in organizations go. Common Craft Videos Great at explaining.

Market 100