What does change(d) look like?

Clark Quinn

Employees would be tightly coupled to their work teams, and more loosely coupled to their communities of practice. Teams would be diverse and flexible, and group work would be the norm. Managers would be playing a leadership and mentoring & coaching role rather than a directive role. In an post this past spring, I opined that we do have to change. One obvious related question is what that change would look like.

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Detailing the Coherent Organization

Clark Quinn

I had, as Harold’s original model provided the basis for, separate groups for Work Teams, Communities of Practice, and Social Networks. In Work Teams, I had included: share problems, co-coach, assist, brainstorm effectively, continuous feedback, welcome contributions, learn from mistakes, align with mission, narrate work, champion diversity, and measure improvement. I ended up with the following diagram, which is very much a work in progress.

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Your Organization Needs Better Diversity and Inclusion Training Now

KnowledgeCity

He’s not wrong— here are some recent statistics about diversity and inclusion in the workplace that back up such statements: Companies with diverse management teams have 19 percent higher revenue Inclusive companies are 1.7 Does your executive team reflect the diverse community you serve?

Your Organization Needs Better Diversity and Inclusion Training Now

KnowledgeCity

Your Organization Needs Better Diversity and Inclusion Training Best Practices Why Mentoring is Crucial to Diversity and Inclusion Efforts Next Steps Conclusion. Inclusion is similar to diversity, except it focuses more on the work environment rather than the demographic makeup.

The Role of the "New" Training Professional

OpenSesame

In many organizations the role of the training professional has transformed; no longer focused on delivering training, today’s L&D professional is now a facilitator of learning who also serves as an information manager, a content curator, and a builder of learning communities. We also encounter employees who readily and actively participate in learning as part of collaborative efforts with team members. Community Builder.

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Role of L&D in the 21C Workplace

ID Reflections

The impact of technology, globalization, ubiquitous connectivity, remote work and distributed work teams, and economy of individuals to name a few drivers have changed the face of workplace learning and performance dramatically. Refer to Ross Dawson’s The Future of Work for a detailed overview. This is the world of work that L&D must support today. It is essential that the L&D team members develop the skills of building their own PLNs.

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Staying Ahead of Critical Corporate Training Initiatives During a Pandemic

NovoEd

The New Normal — Working Remotely. The most impactful prescription from health experts is to observe social distancing — reducing our contact with other people — and for many organizations that means recommending or requiring remote work. L&D Innovation in a Time of Crisis.

Determinism, Best Practice, and the ‘Training Solution’

Charles Jennings

If we’re to learn from others we should be looking at good practice and novel practices that we can adopt and adapt and massage to work in our own specific context. The point I am making is that we certainly need to learn from others on a continual basis, but don’t assume that if we find something working well elsewhere all we need to do is to follow the same ‘recipe’ to get the same results. Best practice exists only in simple working environments.