Seven Things I Learned This Year

Tony Karrer

For example my search for an LMS Solution for Simple Partner Compliance Training didn’t really arrive at just the right solution. What I wrote more about in 2010 than past years: Text-to-Speech (8) OCW (3) SharePoint (8) eLearning Strategy (16) eLearning Tools (34) Corporate eLearning (18) Knowledge Worker (8) Authoring Tools (8) Voice (15) Knowledge Work (4) Captivate (11) Adobe Captivate (6) Enterprise 2.0 (6)

The Best of Times, The Worst of Times: opportunities and challenges for the L&D profession

Performance Learning Productivity

Rethink what’s gone before and adapt to change, or keep on doing what’s always been done in the hope beyond hope that it will work. This is all very positive, and an apparent validation of the existing work L&D departments are carrying out.

Get Employee Onboarding Right

Everwise

The onboarding practices of the past – completing checklists of tasks, filling out forms, and even watching old grainy compliance tapes – may no longer cut it, particularly in industries like knowledge work, where talent (and therefore turnover) is very expensive.

Working Smarter eFieldbook $12

Jay Cross

Working smarter is the key to sustainability and continuous improvement. Knowledge work and learning to work smarter are becoming indistinguishable. The infrastructure for working smarter is called a workscape. It’s the platform where learning and work transpire.

Lotus 71

The 70:20:10 Model – Today, Tomorrow & Beyond

Learnnovators

He also knows ‘what works’ in the world of strategic talent. Charles: I see these shifts in learning as being driven not only by re-thinking the process of learning and development and by emerging technologies, but also by fundamental changes in the world of work. Factors such as changing organisational structures and evolving work practices are important drivers. Charles: We now know that people learn more about their work informally than they do formally.

Thriving in the Net-Work Era

Jay Cross

Before industrialization, work was local or industry meant cottage-industry. About three hundred years ago, work became an organizational matter. Factories require groups of people working together. Clocks measure working hours instead of the sun.