#40years of educational technology: Social media

Learning with 'e's

By 2006 several social networking sites were enjoying surges in popularity, including MySpace, Bebo and of course, Facebook. Social media lend themselves naturally to support learning through discussions, collaboration and sharing. They are vital components of the web, and social media are important for education - because learning is essentially social and personal. Social media is one of the most versatile, and very personal technologies available to teachers.

Theories for the digital age: Postmodern perspectives

Learning with 'e's

Photo by Steve Wheeler Theories for the digital age: Postmodern perspectives by Steve Wheeler is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Folksonomy Flaneur rhizomatic learning social web hyperlink nomad education digital media learning post modernismPostmodernist views of society can be appropriated as lenses to analyse the personalised use of digital technology.

Insiders

Sign Up for our Newsletter

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

The changing Web

Learning with 'e's

Social media - often referred to as Web 2.0 , or the participatory Web - is shaping up to be one of the most important tool sets available to support the promotion of change in education. Almost everyone, it seems, is using some element of social media in the planning, development, delivery, management or evaluation of teaching and learning. Debate focuses on whether the emerging social applications constitute a sea change or revolution in the Web (cf.

Web 44

Learning pathways

Learning with 'e's

The advent of social media, mobile communications and digital media facilitate large, unbounded personal learning networks that mimic the characteristics of rhizomes. There is also evidence that learning communities informally decide their own priorities, often observed in the emerging folksonomies that result when digital content is organised, shared and curated. Folksonomy heutagogy education knowledge learning school rhizome

VLE 52

The social impact of disruptive technology

Learning with e's

I am very much interested in learning psychology, in the way people behave, how they perceive technology and how they use it in teaching and learning, and I have learnt from my research that there are and always will be many people who are resistant to change or reticent about it, because disruptive technologies challenge their social and professional roles. Do you think this has a big social impact?

The survival of higher education (2): Changing times

Learning with 'e's

or the ‘social web’. and provide some examples of current pedagogical practice using the Social Web. Debate centres upon whether the emerging social applications constitute a sea change or revolution in the Web (cf. Personally, I find myself in agreement with Brian Winston (2003), preferring to view social applications as a facet of gradual evolution rather than symptoms of sudden revolution. Essentially, the Web has become more social.

eLearning Topics

Tony Karrer

When you look at the keywords on the left you see things like: Social Learning (356) Social Media (411) Twitter (725) Google Wave (22) Camtasia (76) Adobe Captivate (71) Social Network (460) Now, the content set in this case are highly skewed towards innovators as compared to the topic sets being used by my past analysis (training conferences). I've done a few posts in the past that take a look at the topics that are Hot Topics in Training.

Parabolic learning

Learning with 'e's

We have previously explored a number of learning theories, new learning technologies, concepts around crowdsourcing, wisdom of crowds, folksonomies and user generated content, Web 2.0, The incorporation of a number of social media tools into the mix proved to be an amazing platform from which the students and I could reflect on the process of learning, and amplify our ideas to each other and the world.

Next generation learning

Learning with 'e's

before social media) and Learning 2.0. is socially much richer and more participatory, and relies more on interaction with other learners than any previous learning approach. Social media are enabling learners everywhere to connect and work together with each other, forming convenient communities and networks of shared interest. has seen as shift toward user generated content, and the emergent property of folksonomies.

The architecture of learning

Learning with 'e's

Social tagging for example, is becomes increasingly stronger as people populate it with content and links. The emergent properties of content organisation are folksonomies, and are the product of loose organised that is bottom-up rather than top-down. environments might is social constructivism , because learners increasingly rely on social interaction, and appropriate tools to mediate dialogue. One of the characteristics of Web 2.0,