4 reasons to use Creative Commons

Learning with 'e's

In the social media age, sharing and repurposing are common place. This raises a number of tensions around creativity, intellectual property and copyright. Creative Commons (CC) is a copyright management system that goes a long way to addressing these issues. Creative Commons licences can enable teachers everywhere to access content and share their ideas freely. This is why I'm opposed to closed journals.

Inspire to learn

Learning with 'e's

The big four show no signs of relenting in their profiteering, so several years ago I took a very public decision to resign as editor of a major academic journal. I subsequently pledged that I would never again write, review or edit for a closed academic journal. This is a growing trend as was evidenced recently when the entire editorial team on one of Elsevier's academic journal Lingua resigned over high price and lack of open access.

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Share and share alike

Learning with 'e's

It was only the abstract, but it was translated into Spanish, French and German, for inclusion in an edition of the international peer reviewed journal Educational Media International. I don''t know, but I assume it was, because EMI is a professional journal. EMI would probably have had to pay several people to translate my article, along with all the other articles that appear in the journal. It was self evident in the licence I applied from Creative Commons.

Open educational practices

Learning with e's

So whether it's licensing agreements such as Copyleft or Creative Commons, or open access journals, or even massively online open courses, the open educational practices are gaining ground and influence in the academic world. The publishing houses who once had a strangle hold on academic journals are beginning to lose their grip. And open access journals are opening up knowledge for all without payment.

Open 70

Yesterday's blog post

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But it is probably still true that you are only as good as your last journal article, book, or conference presentation. This is a little different to publishing a paper based journal article or book. You can't delete a journal article, and you can't change it once it's in print. We can debate the ethics of changing a blog post once it has been posted, and yes, there are those who take content under Creative Commons licensing and repurpose it, translate it, embed it.

Dialogue, debate and destinations

Learning with 'e's

I was challenged by delegates at Solstice to elaborate on the legal and ethical issues of Creative Commons and other Copyleft approaches. Creative Commons, I explained, is a means of circumventing Internet Copyright constraints. I gave another challenge to those present to boycott closed journals, and publish in open access journals. cilips Technology digital literacies Panlibus creative commons education library solstice learning Internet

e-Clippings (Learning As Art): Soapbox for the Day: Academic Journals like Field Methods, that dont support things like access to their content

Mark Oehlert

eLearning Guilds Summer Seminar Series | Main | Off Topic: Lets look at this at this as a chance to learn about oil » June 19, 2008 Soapbox for the Day: Academic Journals like Field Methods, that dont support things like access to their content Honest to goodness, someone please respond to me so we can have an open conversation about this. There is a journal, Field Methods , with an editor - H. Have you researched Open Access Journals and found that model to be wanting?

Can Doodling Actually Enhance Training? Apparently, Yes

Mindflash

An April 24 Wall Street Journal article pointed out that several high-tech companies like Facebook are responding to a growing body of evidence that suggests that doodling — sketching ideas out graphically, even if crudely — can simplify communication, fuel collaboration, and help generate new ideas. The Journal piece describes a health-care provider explaining how its insurance branch operates through a big cartoon drawing.) Image used under Creative Commons by INPIVIC.

Is the ivory tower crumbling?

Learning with 'e's

In yesterday's post entitled ' Open or shut ', I wrote about a rise in the number of academics who are turning their back on traditional research publications such as closed journals, in favour of more open, accessible outputs such as blogs and open access journals. The fact is, academics are still judged on their ability to research and publish their findings in 'high impact' peer reviewed journals. So is the journal impact system still a valid measure of academic value?

Down on the farm

Learning with 'e's

I have just been invited by the editor of an online open access peer reviewed journal to review an article. I would be interested in hearing from anyone else who has been invited by 'editors' of 'academic journals' to review articles that are far removed from their expertise area. Down on the farm by Steve Wheeler was written in Plymouth, England and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0

Soapbox for the Day: Academic Journals like Field Methods, that don't support things like access to their content

Mark Oehlert

There is a journal, Field Methods , with an editor - H. Now someone from the journal PLEASE explain to me, what benefits you and/or your customers derives from you having this relationship with this publisher?! Does the journal get a slice of the money that the publisher charges consumers without which the journal could not operate? Could the journal not operate a peer-reviewed, refereed publication without the enormous support it gets from the publisher?

Serendipity

Learning with 'e's

It was quite exciting to appear on the front cover of Training Journal this month. I was approached by the editor of the journal after my presentation in London at the Learning Technologies annual conference. They invited me to speak at several high-profile conferences, to join several editorial boards on well-known journals, and was even offered a job in the US. career education learning Learning Technologies serendipity Technology training journal

Our viral web

Learning with e's

In an interesting episode last year, I personally experienced the power of the viral web through Wikipedia Commons. The next day I posted his picture onto my Flickr account and licenced it under Creative Commons for free sharing and re-use. Subsequently others loaded it up in several versions to Wikimedia Commons. Many journals and newspapers found and used my image of McLaren , with me duly credited as the photographer. We are all Big Brother now.

Web 75

When the dam breaks.

Learning with 'e's

Recently, several writers have bemoaned the fact that a) there is often a significant time delay between the submission of papers to academic journals, and the papers actually reaching the reader b) many of the top, elite journals we are expected to publish in are in fact read by a very small percentage of the community the research is intended to reach. The truth is, not many academics can afford to turn their backs on closed journal publishing.

What if they threw a party and none of us came?

Learning with e's

Before anyone points out the fact that paper based journal cost money to produce, edit, review, print and distribute, I want to make the following points: Most academic journals are run by academics on a voluntary basis - those who review for my journal don't get paid a penny. They receive a free subscription to the journal, (and of course the kudos of working on a journal run by me - priceless!) Academic publishing is changing.

An interview with Michael G Moore

Learning with 'e's

He is well known as one of the pioneers of distance education, one of the original team of academic consultants working with the British government to establish the Open University in the 1960s, and latterly, as the long serving founding editor of the American Journal of Distance Education. Here''s the video: An interview with Michael G Moore by Steve Wheeler is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0

Game changers in the Training Zone

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As we're talking I'm watching citizen journalism going on, on the television in front of me. The TrainingZone podcast - January by Trainingzone on Mixcloud Game changers in the Training Zone by Steve Wheeler is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Xbox 360 Kinect development CTOD Learning Technologies Conference social media Las Vegas training BYOD social networking Training Zone citizen journalism learning mobile learning podcast CES

Breaking down fences

Learning with 'e's

Although journal articles and books are a great source of knowledge, many articles go quickly out of date, and were probably in most cases already out of date by the time they were published, due to ponderous editorial and review processes, and a general back-log of articles that wait in a queue to be published. It's the same for just about every closed pay-per-view journal. Open access journals are better - they are generally more up to date, and are of course free to read.

Counting the cost

Learning with e's

How do we place a price tag on enabling children to channel their fertile imaginations into precious, creative, transformative outcomes? Donate to the Red Cross NZ Earthquake victims fund Image source by Martin Luff Counting the cost by Steve Wheeler is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 social media #eqnz citizen journalism Christchurch disaster New Zealand informal learning earthquake

Cost 68

The Burden to Have an Informed Opinion

Tom Spiglanin

Even journal articles aren’t necessarily credible sources of information today. Open access journals, with credible-sounding names from historically reputable publishers, will apparently publish anything for a fee, as exposed by a “sting” operation by Science Magazine (published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science). This work by [link] is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0

e-Clippings (Learning As Art): Hey! Editors of "Educational Researcher".Get a FREAKING CLUE!!!!!

Mark Oehlert

Mallette.and anybody else directly involved with the choice to publish the journal " Educational Researcher " through SAGE. Why not license this work under Creative Commons ? Why not follow the model of the Public Library of Science Journals ? Or Open Access Journals ? Your authors work is seen by more people, your hard work in editing this journal is seen by more people, the credibility of your peer reviewers is judged by more people.

Expressing creativity

Learning with 'e's

I'm used to writing academic content, papers, conference papers, keynote speeches, chapter for books, peer reviewed journal articles. Now, as a semi-retired academic, I can take back a lot of my time to express my creativity again.

Engaging online learners 1

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International Journal of Educational Technologies , 1 (2/3), 147-166. 2009) Destructive creativity on the social web. Engaging learners can be difficult in any context. Engaging them in online environments can amplify the problem.

Engaging online learners 3

Learning with 'e's

International Journal of Educational Technologies , 1 (2/3), 147-166. Engaging online learners 3 by Steve Wheeler was written in Plymouth, England and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0

Engaging online learners 2

Learning with 'e's

I also mentioned a very useful model that promotes creative, collaboration online writing. International Journal of Educational Technologies , 1 (2/3), 147-166. 2009) Destructive creativity on the social web.

I Believe in the Value of Working out Loud

Tom Spiglanin

Many of us had others in the form of research papers or journal articles. Knowledge hoarding seemed to be a fairly common practice as recently as ten years ago. It now seems to be less and less common by most accounts. This work by [link] is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 This work by [link] is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0

PKM 157

before the ink is dry

Learning with e's

We were talking about our common interest in the educational benefits of blogging, and I made a suggestion that digital identity was a significant factor in the way teachers and other professionals use it (I will blog on this idea in a future post). Journal articles take so long to publish, they are often out of date long before the ink is dry. Will publishing in a high impact journal ensure that you are promoted? No, journals still have their place.

I Believe in the Importance of Personal Knowledge Management

Tom Spiglanin

Social bookmarking sites, trade magazine articles, refereed journal articles, syndicated feeds, aggregation services, and a growing number of automated social tools can greatly simplify the process. This step in our PKM plan is partly about exercising common sense, but also requires critical thinking. Since creative content on the Internet is authored by a wide variety of individuals and seldom refereed, we need to answer for ourselves many questions such as: Does it make sense?

Hacking Digital Learning Strategies #Bookreview

Learning with 'e's

Shelly does not shy away from weighty issues such as motivation, creativity, honesty and truth, but meets them head on, offering teachers a useful practical guide about how to infuse these into every lesson. From citizen journalism to crowdfunded innovation projects, from producing videos to creating digital text books, this volume is replete with relevant, contemporary ideas that leverage the power and potential of technology to help children to learn.

Change and inertia

Learning with 'e's

Indeed, the very first peer reviewed journal article I published, was entitled 'Managing technological change in nurse education'. It appeared in a British Computer Society journal in 1992. Innovation requires new actions and creative solutions to existing problems if it is to succeed. Change and inertia by Steve Wheeler was written in Plymouth, England and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0

This time it's personal

Learning with 'e's

Much has been written on PLEs, including a wealth of peer reviewed journal articles that feature empirical research. Photo by Adib Wahab This time it''s personal by Steve Wheeler is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Personal. Idiosyncratic. Individual. Separate. Different. Unique. Singular. Distinct. Yes, you. Nobody else is like you. Many are similar, but only you are.

Future skills #metalearning

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British Journal of Educational Psychology , 55, 185-212. Future skills #metalearning by Steve Wheeler was written in Plymouth, England and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Photo by Steve Wheeler Lately, I'm asked to speak on this subject more than any other.

Sharp practice

Learning with 'e's

During my keynote for the Zukunft Personal event in Cologne, I publicly announced that I would no longer publish my work in closed journals. In truth, the last time one of my papers was published in a pay-to-subscribe journal was quite some time ago. Many others now only publish their work in open access journals, and I intend to do the same. I will still also continue to write for professional journals and magazines such as Learning Technologies.

Synching feelings

Learning with e's

There is a criticism that blogs are not peer reviewed, contain mainly opinion and have no credibility when compared with peer reviewed journal articles. Journal articles are usually double reviewed by people who are deemed to be experts in their field. The difference between journal articles and blogs is that blogs are peer reviewed within minutes of being posted. Blogs contain a lot of opinion, whereas journal articles are usually based on empirical evidence and research.

Hey! Editors of "Educational Researcher".Get a FREAKING CLUE!!!!!

Mark Oehlert

Mallette.and anybody else directly involved with the choice to publish the journal " Educational Researcher " through SAGE. Why not license this work under Creative Commons ? Why not follow the model of the Public Library of Science Journals ? Or Open Access Journals ? Your authors' work is seen by more people, your hard work in editing this journal is seen by more people, the credibility of your peer reviewers is judged by more people.

Globally connected minds

Learning with 'e's

They will probably publish their work in a highly rated peer reviewed journal which very few will read, because only a very few will be able to penetrate the pay wall the publisher has erected to ''protect'' the research (which has usually been funded through public taxation). Those of us who have become disenchanted with closed journals , will publish our work in open access journals which are not so highly rated, but attract many more readers.

Exploring medical technologies

Learning with 'e's

We made certain that every one of our jointly authored papers was published in high-profile open access journals, and this helped to ensure wide availability of our work to the medical and education communities.