4 reasons to use Creative Commons

Learning with 'e's

In the social media age, sharing and repurposing are common place. This raises a number of tensions around creativity, intellectual property and copyright. Creative Commons (CC) is a copyright management system that goes a long way to addressing these issues. Creative Commons licences can enable teachers everywhere to access content and share their ideas freely.

Stock Photo Image and Other Media Sources

Tony Karrer

EveryStockPhoto is a search engine for creative commons photos, located in Vancouver, BC. This is a single integrated search, allowing users to bookmark their photos with private and public tags, and increasingly we will be offering advanced searching options , rating systems and other tools. You can search for photos, see which photos are the most popular, and which ones have the highest ratings or the most downloads. 9) Creative Express (Getty Images).

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Cammy Beans Learning Visions: Online Portfolios

Learning Visions

Thursday, August 02, 2007 Online Portfolios Jennifer Madrell shows us a great example of an online portofolio , which she calls a "svelte and sparkly version of this blog - that is a requirement and capstone project at Indiana University." Photo Credit: "Briefcase" by Gerson Robles from Stock.xchng Posted by Cammy Bean at 11:21 AM Labels: online portfolio 3comments: Kate Foy said. Cammy at Learning Solutions #ls2010 Audio Interview with Will Thalheimer on Common Des.

Communities and connections

Learning with 'e's

Photo by Airina Volungevi?ien? The video of my keynote (a clipped version from the entire opening plenary session which can be viewed in its entirety on EDENTube ) is about 30 minutes in duration and is followed by a panel discussion with the audience. via ytCropper Communities and connections by Steve Wheeler was written in Bruges, Belgium and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0

Future schools, future visions

Learning with 'e's

Here is an edited version of that discussion, courtesy of the King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz Public Education Development Project. Photo by Steve Wheeler Future schools, future visions by Steve Wheeler was written in Plymouth and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 I must admit I'm a big fan of Richard Gerver and have had the pleasure of working with him now and then over the last few years.

Question Time!

Learning with 'e's

Plymouth Institute of Education staff conducted their own version of Question Time last night for students on the Visions and Values module. Photo from the video by Benji Rogers Question Time by Steve Wheeler was written in Plymouth, England and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Over 100 third year education students attended to hear several colleagues debate the future of the primary curriculum.

#TwistedTropes 24: Maslow's awkward hierarchy

Learning with 'e's

Photo from Wikimedia Commons Everything was awkward about the famous psychologist Abraham Maslow. Sadly, Maslow's Hierarchy became famous for the wrong reasons when learning professionals began to use the pyramid version in their PowerPoint presentations.

Makeshift reality

Learning with 'e's

Photo by Samuel Seller on unsplash Virtual Reality (VR), some might argue, has yet to live up to the hype. I can give three examples: In the UK, Royal Navy recruits new to the topography of nuclear submarines can experience a virtual reality version on their laptops. Makeshift reality by Steve Wheeler was written in Plymouth, England and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0

Review: Adobe Spark

BrightCarbon

Spark lets you search the internet for images with a creative commons licence which you can use for free. Other content blocks include video from YouTube, Vimeo, or Spark Video, a photo gallery and a Glideshow. Adobe Spark is an online and mobile design app.

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Categorisation cults

Learning with 'e's

There are many versions of this, depending on what kind of drugs people have been taking. Photo from Pixabay Categorisation cults by Steve Wheeler was written in Plymouth, England and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 I have always been uncomfortable with the categorisation of students.

The future of reading

Learning with 'e's

In versions of the 2012 Horizon Report, eBooks were considered by many of the expert panel to be on the 1 year horizon for full adoption into education. The Sieghart Review recommends that digital versions of books should be loaned to users without charge, and also that loaners should be able to borrow their books using online ordering facilities.

Our viral web

Learning with e's

In an interesting episode last year, I personally experienced the power of the viral web through Wikipedia Commons. The next day I posted his picture onto my Flickr account and licenced it under Creative Commons for free sharing and re-use. Subsequently others loaded it up in several versions to Wikimedia Commons. My photo even graces his Wikipedia page (in all language versions). We are all Big Brother now.

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How to Get Your Training Presentation From Good to Great With Images, Audio, and Video

Mindflash

Photos, sound files and video clips are always great ways to liven up great presentations. A few quick examples: Photos. A retail clerk needs to categorize items rung up at the point of sale — photos of the inventory aid in product recognition. Trainees at a call center must provide consistent answers to common questions — sound clips demonstrate the proper language. Not surprisingly, adding video is more challenging than adding sound or photos.

Digital habitus

Learning with 'e's

This is representative of the manner in which we habituate into digital media, believing that we are laying down versions of our thoughts and behaviour from real life. In fact, it is possible that the digital versions of ourselves that exist online are in fact original and have never previously existed. Photo by Steve H on Flickr Digital habitus by Steve Wheeler is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0

Hyperconnected

Learning with 'e's

million search enquiries on Google, nearly 2 million photos created on Snapchat , over 4 million hours of video watched on the video sharing channel YouTube (and 400 hours uploaded), nearly half a million tweets sent on Twitter, and more than 16 million text messages sent. Recently I shared a version of this infographic on Twitter, with the caption: 'We are all just one click away from connecting with every other Internet user.

Going off road

Learning with 'e's

I like to go off road and explore, and I often find myself down some backstreet in a city I've never visited before, chatting to locals or taking photos of strange new sights. Lesson plans are a little version of the curriculum. Image/graphic text by Miot Sheremeti Going off road by Steve Wheeler was written in Plymouth, England and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Veering off the beaten track is something I often do.

The #blimage challenge spreads

Learning with 'e's

There is now a Dutch language version called #blimageNL and hopefully other language versions will follow. Here's the video Amy created to explain the #blimage challenge: As Amy says, #blimage 'makes your brain dance with metaphorical thinking', it compels you to think more creatively, and I might add, it gets you involved in dialogue and connections with your personal learning network.

The first technology

Learning with 'e's

Rather, I'm inclined to agree with the argument proposed by Brian Winston (1998), that we are witnessing an evolution of tools, and that all new technologies and ideas are based upon older versions, updated, upgraded and extended. Photo by Pexels The first technology by Steve Wheeler was written in Plymouth, England and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0

When will my (3D) prints appear?

Learning with 'e's

Architects, designers, food technologists and also the military, are discovering the benefits of creating 3D versions of reality. Photo by Jonathan Juursema on Wikimedia Commons When will my prints appear? by Steve Wheeler was written in Preston, England and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 With 3D printers, we are able to address problems we have never solved before.

Devil in the detail

Learning with 'e's

After all, the ability to continually iterate versions of text or image is part of the creative process. Even better if each version can be preserved to be shown as a process of discovery or creativity that is equally valued with the finished product. Photo by Alex Morfin on Wikimedia Commons Devil in the detail by Steve Wheeler was written in Liberec, Czech Republic and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0

#LearningIs creative

Learning with 'e's

Learning can certainly be creative, if the conditions are right. Firstly, creative learning requires active engagement. Creative learning in the classroom is almost always 'small c' creativity. If it were 'big C' creativity, then we would all be geniuses, discovering earth changing formulae and devising life changing inventions. But it's creative for them. That's 'small c' creativity, and it's the basis for self regulated learning.

Intervention learning

Learning with 'e's

Photo from Wikimedia Commons Predictably, the ideas that dominated at Learning Technologies 2019 (#LT19uk) were mostly on new and emerging technologies. NB: An expanded version of the Royal Mail/Sponge case study features in Digital Learning in Organisations (Published by Kogan Page on April 3, 2019). Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) cropped up several times during sessions across the event.

Who's afraid of the big bad MOOC?

Learning with 'e's

Next came the institutional versions, the xMOOCs, which borrowed the 'free at the point of delivery' open and online model but emphasised formal assessment and accreditation (which is clearly where the money is). Quasi versions of open online learning already existed, such as the incredibly popular video based Khan Academy content. Regardless of these detractions, several universities have bought into the vision and have launched their own versions.

Never give in!

Learning with 'e's

Photo by Tom Burke on Wikimedia Commons Never give in! by Steve Wheeler was written in Plymouth and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 NB: This post in a previous version was first published in 2011. It is said that Robert the Bruce once sat in a cave watching a spider as it attempted to spin its web.

Making the future of education

Learning with 'e's

A lot of institutions are adopting versions of this method, and are employing technology, particularly video and online content to achieve it. Photo by Mitch Altman on Flickr Making the future of education by Steve Wheeler is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Many would agree that a lot needs to be done to bring education up to date.

Learning as dialogue

Learning with 'e's

Later, Piaget, Inhelder and others were responsible for introducing a cognitive version of learning theory which held that children were ''solo scientists'' who constructed their own meaning through exploration of their environment. Photo source Learning as dialogue by Steve Wheeler is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Many of the earlier learning theories place the learner in splendid isolation.

Offline Publishing and Viewing Options with Articulate Storyline®

SweetRush

In my experience, the courses will behave adequately as long as you stay away from Microsoft Internet Explorer ®, and use latest versions of Google Chrome ™ , Mozilla Firefox ® , or Safari ® instead. Photo credit: Eric Dombach via Flick.com Creative Commons. One of the most popular questions coming from our clients in relation to Storyline-authored content is about offline viewing options. The reasons for such requirements vary.

Sun, Sangria and Spanish flies

Learning with 'e's

After an hour of bottling the most expensive brand of lemonade, a bell sounded and the production team switched labels and started bottling a budget version. Photo by Christopher Lynn on Flickr Sun, Sangria and Spanish flies by Steve Wheeler was written in Plymouth, England and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0

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Like a sponge

Learning with 'e's

If you want to read more, the full version is on the Sponge website. Photo by Steven Depolo on Flickr Like a sponge by Steve Wheeler is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 I did an interview for Sponge UK last week, talking about my views on technology in learning, and speculating on the future (as you do).

Who's in charge?

Learning with 'e's

Student centred learning encourages learners to develop an internal locus of control where anything is possible, and where in progressive versions, they choose what they will learn, how they will learn it and even how they will be assessed. Quillian and Collins Spreading Activation Theory Photo by NEC Corporation on Flickr Who's in charge? by Steve Wheeler was written in Plymouth, England and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0

Activity learning

Learning with 'e's

Figure 1: Second generation Activity Theory The theory Vygotsky''s earlier concept of mediation, which encompassed learning alongside others (Zone of Proximal Development) and through interaction with artefacts, was the basis for Engeström''s version of AT (known as Scandinavian Activity Theory). This is number 8 in my series on learning theories.

Cut and thrust

Learning with 'e's

The latter has many variants, including the #ukedchat British version and #edchatie for Irish educators, and are public discussion zones where any teacher who is interested can join in to share ideas and chew over the educational issues of the day. Photo by emaze.com Cut and thrust by Steve Wheeler was written in Plymouth, England and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 I saw a thought provoking blog post this week.

About time

Learning with 'e's

They look very shiny and high tech in those television shows, but the earliest real versions were incredibly expensive, had clumsy designs and were probably not that easy to use either (for personal communicator read mobile phone, and for replicator think 3D printer). Photo from this website About time by Steve Wheeler is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Time flies like an arrow (.and and fruit flies like a banana - yes.

Movie 46

Tools I Use

Marcia Conner

Mobile and desktop versions available. Instagram – A media sharing social network, used primarily on smart phones, provides special effects you can apply to photos to make them look terrific. Because Instagram links with 4Square and other social tools, you can also check into the location where you’re taking the picture and post your photos to other social sites. I use the version of WordPress than needs to be hosted on a website.

Buying steam?

Learning with 'e's

The provisionality of digital media - that is, the capability to change or edit an entire text instantly - and the cloud based storage that makes one version available for all to access but not to own in the physical sense, make it likely that the system could be abused. Or is the next generation of readers already sold on the idea of digital only versions of books? Photo from Wikimedia Commons Buying steam?

Corporate learning in the digital age

Learning with 'e's

The interview, by Bettina Wallbrecht and Stefanie Hornung for Zukunft Personal is also available in a more extended version in German at this link. You see, all of my content is licensed under Creative Commons, which means that it can be shared and repurposed under the same licence with which I have licensed it. Learning in many organisations is going through radical change.

Why schools shouldn't ban smartphones

Learning with 'e's

It has been edited from my original longer version and can also be viewed here on the newspaper site ). I can take you to many schools in the Plymouth area where technology is being used responsibly and creatively to engage children, enhancing, extending and enriching their learning experiences. They use smartphones and tablets to solve maths problems, blog to develop their creative writing skills, build robots and learn how to code.