Cultural Barriers to Organizational Learning

The Performance Improvement Blog

All organizations have a culture. Some cultures support learning more than others. Some cultures stifle learning by marginalizing the training and development function, by discouraging risk-taking, by not rewarding learning, by not allowing opportunities for informal and social learning, and by undermining performance improvement efforts. In a learning culture, the pursuit of learning is woven into the fabric of organizational life.

Assessing Your Organizational Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

To what extent does your organization have a learning culture? What is your current culture? Using Edgar Schein ’s definition of organizational culture, you’ll want to know to what extent: Underlying beliefs and assumptions support learning in your organization. Values and principles drive learning in your organization. Do employees, their teams, and the organization as-a-whole know what they need to learn to be successful?

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Organizational Learning Tools

The Performance Improvement Blog

What are the tools of organizational learning? As I’ve stated in a previous blog post , a high performing organization needs a comprehensive approach to learning and a set of tools to facilitate learning. A training program, or an educational event, or even a CEO’s speech about the importance of learning is not enough. These categories of learners and tools translate into a four by three matrix of learners and learning tools.

10 Principles of Organizational Learning DNA

The Performance Improvement Blog

How do we know if an organization has the “DNA” that predisposes it to organizational learning? Gary Neilson and Jaime Estupinan have been studying and writing about "organizational DNA" for the past 10 years. They explain the term this way: We use the term organizational DNA as a metaphor for the underlying organizational and cultural design factors that define an organization’s personality and determine whether it is strong or weak in executing strategy.

Force Field Analysis of Organizational Learning

The Performance Improvement Blog

learning) and the factors that block people from achieving that change. The table below lists forces that commonly drive learning in organizations and the factors that block learning in organizations. Lack of Leadership Support. Work vs. Learning. What are the factors that drive and block learning in your organization? Leadership Learning Culture Organization Culture Organizational Learning Teamwork Training

LearnTrends: Reinventing Organizational Learning

Experiencing eLearning

These are my live blogged notes from Jay Cross & Clark Quinn’s LearnTrends session on Reinventing Organizational Learning. Article they wrote for CLO mag: “Become a Chief Meta-Learning Officer&#. If you don’t know the solution & need to network/collaborate to find it, that’s learning. Internet Learning Alliance: They were all working independently, decided to work together and practice what they preach. improve learning process.

Key Elements of a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

A “learning culture” is a community of workers continuously and collectively seeking performance improvement through new knowledge, new skills, and new applications of knowledge and skills to achieve the goals of the organization. A learning culture is a culture of inquiry; an environment in which employees feel safe asking tough questions about the purpose and quality of what they are doing for customers, themselves, and other stakeholders.

Becoming a Social Business – Beyond Culture Change

Learnnovators

The usual culprits are the hapless organizational culture closely followed by hierarchy and leadership lethargy. We have become accustomed to blaming the culture of an organization for the failure of any initiative, and more so when the change calls for redefining and re-imagining how people work and interact. No matter how hard we try to change the culture – and I do believe that leaders and managers are trying – the discourse we use lets us down.

Creating a Culture for Learning

The Performance Improvement Blog

The culture that underpins a managing minds approach must support and encourage an ongoing and collective discovery, sharing, and appli­cation of knowledge and skills at the individual, team, and organization levels. A culture that supports managing minds is a culture of inquiry; an environment in which people feel safe challenging the status quo, taking risks, and enhancing the quality of what they do for customers, themselves, shareholders, and other stakeholders.

Organization Culture Change

The Performance Improvement Blog

In the online course that I teach for ASTD on Developing an Organizational Learning Culture , one of the questions I hear most often is, “How can I change the culture in my company when there is little support from management and our unions resist any change that might affect the work rules?” It took decades to create the culture that currently exists in many of these organizations and any significant change is going to take time, effort and perseverance. .

A Productive Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

In a blog post titled, "Building a Productive Learning Culture", Thomas Handcock and Jean Martin say that businesses, because of need and demand, are increasing employee participation in training but failing to increase productivity. Even with all of these additional opportunities for learning, most workers are not acquiring the knowledge and skills they need to be successful. The authors believe that a culture change is required.

INFOGRAPHIC: High Performance Learning Ecosystems

Learnnovators

I’ve previously written about the need to design learning & high performance ecosystems here , and have been reflecting on some common ingredients for effective ones. I’ve captured some of these in the infographic below: 5 Ingredients of HIGH PERFORMANCE ECOSYSTEM : COMPANY CULTURE. PERFORMANCE SUPPORT. Arun Pradhan has over 17 years’ experience in digital and blended learning.

PwC Canada Strives for a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

If you’re looking for examples of companies that are striving to create and sustain a learning culture, PwC ( PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP) of Canada should be on your list. I recently had the pleasure of speaking about the importance of a learning culture to the Edmonton meeting of The Conference Board of Canada’s Council for Learning and Leadership Development. Incorporating structured learning routines into our working practices (e.g.

Why Your Organization Needs a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

A learning culture is a community of workers continuously and collectively seeking performance improvement through new knowledge, new skills, and new applications of knowledge and skills to achieve the goals of the organization. A learning culture is a culture of inquiry; an environment in which employees feel safe challenging the status quo and taking risks to enhance the quality of what they do for customers, themselves, and other stakeholders.

Creating a Culture for Learning

The Performance Improvement Blog

The culture that underpins a managing minds approach must support and encourage an ongoing and collective discovery, sharing, and appli­cation of knowledge and skills at the individual, team, and organization levels. A culture that supports managing minds is a culture of inquiry; an environment in which people feel safe challenging the status quo, taking risks, and enhancing the quality of what they do for customers, themselves, shareholders, and other stakeholders.

Eight Leader Habits of a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

Eight leader habits are essential to a learning culture. These are behaviors ingrained in the routines and rituals of organizations that are continually learning and learning how to learn. Leaders in these organizations do the following: Send the message - Leaders communicate the importance of learning to the organization. Build trust - Employees will invest time and effort in learning if they trust their managers.

Why Continued Organizational Learning is Critical to your Performance and Culture

WalkMe Training Station

The first article was “ How ‘Learning Organizations’ Beat Natural Selection” . Organizational learning allows for teams to learn exactly what is relevant to their specific tasks and specialties while other information they do not need is given to the individuals and teams that need it, with some Venn overlap between for cooperation. In other words, how can organizations create a business culture that encourages learning and development?

Organizational Learning Infrastructure

Clark Quinn

However, then the easy, and uninteresting answer, is to fall into talking about elearning, performance support, mobile, portals, knowledge management, all that stuff that makes people’s eyes glaze over if they haven’t seen the light. What I realized today was that what I’m really about is improving organizational learning infrastructure. It’s about culture, policies, processes, procedures, tools, templates, incentives, and more.

Situated Learning: Essential for a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

Recently, I had an experience that, for me, exemplifies the meaning of “situated learning”. With my iPad next to the water heater, I learned how to reset the little computer that regulates the pilot light and gas. Learning in this case required all of the elements of the actual situation: the particular water heater; the basement environment; the pressure I (and my wife) felt to have hot water; and my limited knowledge about modern heating and cooling.

Becoming a Learning Culture: Competing in an Age of Disruption

The Performance Improvement Blog

Any company, faced with these kinds of disruptive forces must keep learning. Employees must learn how to use new computers and new apps, how to operate new, high tech machinery, how to be responsive to customer demands, how to create innovative products and services, how to manage a multi-cultural, multi-generational workforce, how to work effectively in cross-functional teams, and how to plan for a future that is constantly in flux. Learning is just-in-time, on-demand.

Manager's Role in Learning and Performance Improvement

The Performance Improvement Blog

What should be a manager’s role in employee learning? In answering this question, the first thing managers have to understand is that continuous learning is the modus operandi for all high performance organizations. Individual, team, and enterprise performance can’t improve without learning. Learning isn’t in addition to a manager’s job; it IS a manager’s job. An engineer in a prototype department of a manufacturer learns how to operate a 3D printer.

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KnowledgeStar: The App for a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

As a proponent of a learning culture in organizations, I’m always on the lookout for methods and products that contribute to creating and sustaining that kind of culture. KnowledgeStar™ promises to deliver just-in-time, just-enough learning to make machines smart and employees smarter, increasing safety and productivity. Proximity beacons, smart devices and information in the cloud have made performance support automatic, two-way and timely.

How to Create a Learning Culture in Organizations

The Performance Improvement Blog

Several excellent blog posts have recently come to my attention that, when combined, provide a how-to for creating a learning culture in organizations. One of these posts appears in Jane Hart’s blog, Learning in the Social Workplace. In this post , she writes that workplace learning is: Structured learning experiences (e.g., training) and informal learning experiences (e.g., Helping workers learn continuously on the job.

Top 10 Questions to Evaluate a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

In a discussion started by Camilla Keen on LinkedIn, she asks, “In order to find out and evaluate if a company has an effective learning culture, what would be your top ten questions?” I commented: Are leaders communicating the importance of learning (acquiring new knowledge, skills, and capabilities) and holding managers accountable for learning and applying that learning to making a difference for the organization?

Learning Organization is Culture, Processes, and Leadership

The Performance Improvement Blog

Organizational learning” and “learning organization” are terms that continue to be misused. It seems like these days any business, nonprofit, or government agency that provides training and education to its employees calls itself a learning organization. With the proliferation of elearning and mlearning, I’m afraid that more accessible training and education is being confused with learning. I interpret “environment” to mean organizational culture.

Reprise: How to Create a Learning Culture in Organizations

The Performance Improvement Blog

Several excellent blog posts have recently come to my attention that, when combined, provide a how-to for creating a learning culture in organizations. One of these posts appears in Jane Hart ’s blog, Learning in the Social Workplace. In this post , she writes that workplace learning is: Structured learning experiences (e.g., training) and informal learning experiences (e.g., Helping workers learn continuously on the job.

Performance Reviews Are Bad for Learning

The Performance Improvement Blog

A survey of SHRM members conducted in August indicates that although most organizations say that a performance management system is important to them, few think that their companies are doing a good job managing performance. Given that having annual and semi-annual formal performance reviews is a key aspect of performance management in nearly all of these organizations, it’s no wonder that HR leaders don’t rate their organizations highly in this regard.

Learning Culture: A Workplace Environment for Success (Part One)

The Performance Improvement Blog

In a two-part article I wrote for BusinessThinker.com titled, Learning Culture: A Workplace Environment for Success , I start by posing some questions that I think people need to ask themselves about their organizations to determine if they need a stronger learning culture: Do you want employees to care about their work and their customers and go the extra mile? Do you want employees who openly discuss ways to improve performance?

Learning Culture: A Workplace Environment for Success (Part Two)

The Performance Improvement Blog

In the second part of a two-part article I wrote for BusinessThinker.com titled, Learning Culture: A Workplace Environment for Success , I describe what organizations can do to develop a learning culture. We have learned from the Gallup Organization’s 20 year-long research project that the most significant relationships in any organization is between managers and their direct reports. Managers are the gatekeepers to individual and team learning.

Learning Culture & Human Capital: The Reality, the Myth and the Vision

The Performance Improvement Blog

iLearning Forum is the most important learning meeting in Europe. While preparing the Learning technologies France 2018 conference programme, I have been doing research and reading, and in particular looking at L&D trends, Talent Management and Human capital management. So much for Human Capital Management and Learning Culture! That is to say the change in work performed and the increased value of that work.

Hospital Culture Trumps Equipment and Techniques

The Performance Improvement Blog

If you hire the top people in their professions and have state-of-the-art technology, will that ensure organizational success? But clinicians and leaders at a high-performing hospital would be eager to address the error, acknowledging it without disparaging one another and working together to re-examine and, if necessary, reconfigure the hospital’s discharge process. Culture shapes how things are done. In hospitals, culture has life and death implications.

ASTD Webcast on Manager's Role in Employee Learning and Performance Improvement

The Performance Improvement Blog

I did a webcast for the American Society for Training & Development (ASTD) on the topic of the manager’s role in employee learning and performance improvement. First, I defined learning in organizations as “acquiring and applying the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and beliefs that help individuals, teams, and whole organizations improve performance.” Supporting learning is not in addition to a manager’s job; it IS a manager’s job.

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6 Steps To Creating Learning Ecosystems (And Why You Should Bother)

Learnnovators

70:20:10 has shone a spotlight on the limits of formal learning. In contrast, social and experiential learning continue to be veritable goldmines of productivity, placing learners at the centre of their story and demanding a major shift from Learning & Development professionals. Central to this cultural shift is the understanding that learning happens by learners, not to them. That’s where learning ecosystems come in. SUPPORT REFLECTION. “

Re-thinking Learning and Performance from a Business Standpoint

ID Reflections

Yesterday, I wrote a post on Learning vs. Performance – the Dichotomy. It was more of a theoretical exposition on why learning doesn’t necessarily translate into performance, and delved into some of the psychological and behavioral aspects of the same. Why is it that learning and training don’t translate into performance? Why are employees still not performing as expected? What does matter – critically – is performance and the impact on business.

Megan Torrance Talks About Learning in Organizations

The Performance Improvement Blog

I’m always looking for examples of companies that put learning ahead of training. They design custom learning experiences for client organizations by starting with the intended results and related performance problems and then, and only then, do they provide employees with the tools, structures, and processes to learn what they need to know and do to be successful. . One is the key role of managers in learning. The second insight is “collaborative learning”.

Smart Companies Have Learned How to Learn

The Performance Improvement Blog

David Grebow, in a blog post titled Only Smart Companies Will Win , writes about the necessity of changing from a training culture to a learning culture. He writes: As recently as eight or ten years ago, transforming your organization’s culture from a teacher-led training culture to a learning culture, driven by digital technology, may have been a matter of managerial preference.

This Is What I Believe About Learning in Organizations

The Performance Improvement Blog

The Purpose of Business is Learning. But none of this is possible without learning. At its core, any high performing organization is about learning; continually using new information to become smarter, better, and more effective. To survive and thrive today, industries need innovation which is essentially about learning. Companies must learn more deeply about their customers and markets. Training Is Not Learning. It’s the Culture.