Assessing Your Organizational Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

To what extent does your organization have a learning culture? What is your current culture? Using Edgar Schein ’s definition of organizational culture, you’ll want to know to what extent: Underlying beliefs and assumptions support learning in your organization. Values and principles drive learning in your organization. Do employees, their teams, and the organization as-a-whole know what they need to learn to be successful?

Force Field Analysis of Organizational Learning

The Performance Improvement Blog

learning) and the factors that block people from achieving that change. The table below lists forces that commonly drive learning in organizations and the factors that block learning in organizations. Work vs. Learning. Not Role of Managers. What are the factors that drive and block learning in your organization? Leadership Learning Culture Organization Culture Organizational Learning Teamwork Training

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LearnTrends: Reinventing Organizational Learning

Experiencing eLearning

These are my live blogged notes from Jay Cross & Clark Quinn’s LearnTrends session on Reinventing Organizational Learning. Article they wrote for CLO mag: “Become a Chief Meta-Learning Officer&#. If you don’t know the solution & need to network/collaborate to find it, that’s learning. Internet Learning Alliance: They were all working independently, decided to work together and practice what they preach. improve learning process.

Uberizing Organizational Learning – Thinking Beyond Courses

ID Reflections

We have to think agile, instant, accessible, contextual, micro-sized, real time… We need to uberize organizational learning. Uberization ” has taken off as the new term that according to me has come to stand for – disruption, innovation, lean operating model, harnessing of the affordances of the sharing economy, and a hyper-connected world driven by imagination and creativity where everything is a mobile-click away – including learning. Learning is no exception.

Manager's Role in Learning and Performance Improvement

The Performance Improvement Blog

What should be a manager’s role in employee learning? In answering this question, the first thing managers have to understand is that continuous learning is the modus operandi for all high performance organizations. Individual, team, and enterprise performance can’t improve without learning. Learning isn’t in addition to a manager’s job; it IS a manager’s job. An engineer in a prototype department of a manufacturer learns how to operate a 3D printer.

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Hiring for a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

One of the keys to creating and sustaining a learning culture is hiring people who are continuous learners and who help others learn continuously. You want people who recognize the learning needs of others and can figure out ways to support their growth as part of the day-to-day work of the organization. Edgar Wilson, in a post on e.Mile , writes that a “healthy” learning culture has four features: . It’s learning ability.

21rst Century Organizations Need a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

Most companies today have a “training culture”. ATD’s 2016 State of the Industry report concludes: …the traditional, instructor-led, face-to-face classroom continues to play a crucial role, and it was still the delivery mechanism for 51 percent of learning hours used in 2015. Which is to say that most learning in organizations is still delivered using formal, structured, leader-centered training methods.

How to Create a Learning Culture in Organizations

The Performance Improvement Blog

Several excellent blog posts have recently come to my attention that, when combined, provide a how-to for creating a learning culture in organizations. One of these posts appears in Jane Hart’s blog, Learning in the Social Workplace. In this post , she writes that workplace learning is: Structured learning experiences (e.g., training) and informal learning experiences (e.g., Helping workers learn continuously on the job.

Reprise: How to Create a Learning Culture in Organizations

The Performance Improvement Blog

Several excellent blog posts have recently come to my attention that, when combined, provide a how-to for creating a learning culture in organizations. One of these posts appears in Jane Hart ’s blog, Learning in the Social Workplace. In this post , she writes that workplace learning is: Structured learning experiences (e.g., training) and informal learning experiences (e.g., Helping workers learn continuously on the job.

Reasons Why You Need to Create a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

I have argued in previous blog posts that organizations need a learning culture because training is not sufficient to develop the necessary competencies of 21rst century workers. For one thing, the learning from training events is often not transferred to the workplace. Also, formal training cannot be responsive to the kind of learning agility that is needed in the high tech, competitive world that we live in today.

Learning Culture: A Workplace Environment for Success (Part Two)

The Performance Improvement Blog

In the second part of a two-part article I wrote for BusinessThinker.com titled, Learning Culture: A Workplace Environment for Success , I describe what organizations can do to develop a learning culture. We have learned from the Gallup Organization’s 20 year-long research project that the most significant relationships in any organization is between managers and their direct reports. Managers are the gatekeepers to individual and team learning.

Reprise: Do You Have a Learning Culture? (Part Two)

The Performance Improvement Blog

In "Part One" of this post, I presented some situations in which espoused values (not necessarily values in use) play a role and examples of instinctive reactions that indicate either the presence or absence of a learning culture. . What did you learn from trying to build the app? What did you learn about developing new products, about collaboration, and about yourself? Learning Culture Management Organization Culture Organizational Learning

Why Continued Organizational Learning is Critical to your Performance and Culture

WalkMe Training Station

The first article was “ How ‘Learning Organizations’ Beat Natural Selection” . Organizational learning allows for teams to learn exactly what is relevant to their specific tasks and specialties while other information they do not need is given to the individuals and teams that need it, with some Venn overlap between for cooperation. In other words, how can organizations create a business culture that encourages learning and development?

How to Create a Learning Culture in Start-Ups and Small Businesses

The Performance Improvement Blog

How We Built a Workplace People Love , explains what small companies and departments in large organizations can do to create a learning culture. He addresses fear, reward systems, hiring, on-boarding, learning, making mistakes, and experimenting. We must come to grips with the role that "manufactured fear" plays as a technique for increasing performance in teams. These are the true signs of a learning organization. Collaboration will not occur in this culture.

Do You Have a Learning Culture? (Part Two)

The Performance Improvement Blog

In "Part One" of this post, I presented some situations in which espoused values (not necessarily values in use) play a role and examples of instinctive reactions that indicate either the presence or absence of a learning culture. . What did you learn from trying to build the app? What did you learn about developing new products, about collaboration, and about yourself?

ASTD Webcast on Manager's Role in Employee Learning and Performance Improvement

The Performance Improvement Blog

I did a webcast for the American Society for Training & Development (ASTD) on the topic of the manager’s role in employee learning and performance improvement. First, I defined learning in organizations as “acquiring and applying the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and beliefs that help individuals, teams, and whole organizations improve performance.” Supporting learning is not in addition to a manager’s job; it IS a manager’s job.

Keep Growing Your Organizational Learning Pyramid

CLO Magazine

An Inclusive Learning Growth Pyramid. Some organizations provide myriad opportunities for learning at different levels of the organizational pyramid. An inclusive learning pyramid would help employees at every level to learn the relevant skills and grow to the next level. Careers are no longer narrowly defined by jobs and skills but through experiences and learning agility.”. Onboarding forms the base of the inclusive learning growth pyramid.

Megan Torrance Talks About Learning in Organizations

The Performance Improvement Blog

I’m always looking for examples of companies that put learning ahead of training. They design custom learning experiences for client organizations by starting with the intended results and related performance problems and then, and only then, do they provide employees with the tools, structures, and processes to learn what they need to know and do to be successful. . One is the key role of managers in learning. The second insight is “collaborative learning”.

This Is What I Believe About Learning in Organizations

The Performance Improvement Blog

The Purpose of Business is Learning. But none of this is possible without learning. At its core, any high performing organization is about learning; continually using new information to become smarter, better, and more effective. To survive and thrive today, industries need innovation which is essentially about learning. Companies must learn more deeply about their customers and markets. Training Is Not Learning. Manager’s Role is People.

Tips to Consider for Improving Learning Culture in Organizations

G-Cube

E-learning is diverse and it goes beyond teaching and curriculum, to disseminate information and support organizational growth. However, the success of any e-learning strategy depends upon the workforce using it for stronger skills and knowledge matrix. It is also true for large enterprises that represent a big evolution in their work methodologies and the role of learning within an organization. Managers and leaders should support e-learning strategy.

MOOCs in Workplace Learning – Part 4: Role in Corporate Universities

Learnnovators

Organizations are struggling to keep up with the shifts: in technology that are vastly impacting how people work, in the demography of their workforce which has become culturally diverse, multi-generational, and globally dispersed, in the nature of work that has moved from complicated to complex and emergent, and with the general fragmentation and breakdown of all aspects of the known ways of doing things. Changing Corporate Culture. Enable peer-to-peer collaboration and learning.

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Four False Assumptions About Leadership Development

The Performance Improvement Blog

I don’t think that organizations are going to close this leadership gap until they confront four false assumptions about learning that are deeply embedded in their cultures. Once is enough – This is the belief that people can learn something as complex and ego threatening as leadership the first time they are exposed to the material. Just because you are in a leadership role doesn’t mean you are an effective leader. and then applying that new found learning.

Managing the Self-Directed Learner

The Performance Improvement Blog

Plugging in to what she needed to learn was as direct and fast as the screenwriters could imagine…. In a managing minds company, it is critical that employees take responsibility for their own learning, pulling the information they need when and where they need it. Self-directed learners are people who get intrinsic rewards from their ability to locate, curate, share, and communicate what they have learned independently. Manager Role. Learner Role.

AT&T Needs a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

Clearly, he and his executives recognize the need for employee learning and a culture that supports that learning. First of all, training is not learning. But organizational learning comes from applying new knowledge and skills in practice and then on-the-job, from seeing clearly how those new competencies will help the company, getting feedback, and having the support of their managers. Work and learning merge into the role of all employees.

Manager Engagement in Employee Learning: More Work or More Reward?

The Performance Improvement Blog

I was asked during my recent ASTD Webcast whether there’s data to show that managers, who are more involved in training and learning, ultimately receive more rewards and recognition than those who aren''t. While I’m not aware of research that ties training-involved managers with their own success in companies, I am aware of very successful companies who value highly the role of managers in training and learning and recognize and reward that involvement.

Beyond Training: Three Models

The Performance Improvement Blog

Organizational learning is so much more than training. Three models of learning convey the breadth of options that, depending on what an employee needs to learn, are more effective, cheaper, and easier to implement than formal training programs. One of these models I call “50 Ways to Lever Learning.” This list fits into the push vs. pull model of learning in organizations. Another model is what Bersin by Deloitte calls the “Learning Technology Stack.”

The Future of Education and Training in an Automated Workplace (Reprise)

The Performance Improvement Blog

It's a vexing question: As automation, robots, and AI do more of the work that people used to do, and do it better and safer in many cases, what will people be doing and how should we educate and train people for these new roles? But how to do that, and whether training can outpace automation, are open questions…People still need to learn skills, the respondents said, but they will do that continuously over their careers.

What Can Managers Do to Create and Sustain Learning?

The Performance Improvement Blog

Managers in any organization, whether nonprofit, government, or business, play a pivotal role in creating and sustaining learning. However, they do have to believe that people can learn and change, they have to care about their own learning, and they have to value the development of the people they supervise. If they have these beliefs and values, then managers can contribute significantly to learning in their organizations.

Know the Hidden Curriculum of Work

The Performance Improvement Blog

But this learning is more important for survival and success in the workplace over the long term. . Nobody trained you to succeed in this hidden work, and you have to learn how to confront its everyday pitfalls. These two elements combined — the challenges of your job-within-the-job plus the need to add value to your organization through continuous learning and performance — represent what I call the hidden curriculum of work.

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The 5As Framework for Increasing Impact of Learning in Organizations

The Performance Improvement Blog

You don’t get as much value as you should out of your organization’s training and development programs In fact, the number of trainees who apply new learning in their organizations is estimated to be only about 15% to 20%. The 5As Framework is an easy to remember aid for ensuring that any learning intervention, whether classroom training, elearning, coaching and mentoring, self-directed study, internships, etc., For a description of the role of managers in the 5As Framework: [link].

MOOCS IN WORKPLACE LEARNING – PART 4: ROLE IN CORPORATE UNIVERSITIES

Learnnovators

Organizations are struggling to keep up with the shifts: in technology that are vastly impacting how people work, in the demography of their workforce which has become culturally diverse, multi-generational, and globally dispersed, in the nature of work that has moved from complicated to complex and emergent, and with the general fragmentation and breakdown of all aspects of the known ways of doing things. Changing Corporate Culture. The world has gotten complicated.

Learn, Adapt, Innovate

The Performance Improvement Blog

The culture of traditional, hierarchical organizations does not allow for the scope and speed of learning, adaptation, and innovation that is needed to compete and be successful in today’s environment. Edgar Schein spells out the problem in his chapter in the book, Creating a Learning Culture: The rate of technological, economic, political, and sociocultural change is increasing, and organizations are, therefore, finding it more and more important to figure out how to adapt.

Year In Review - 2017

The Performance Improvement Blog

With the publication of my new book, Minds at Work: Managing for Success in the Knowledge Economy , I have continued to focus my blog posts on a manager’s role in supporting continuous learning for all employees in the workplace. And I have examined an employee’s responsibility for continuous learning in the Knowledge Economy. Here are the five blog posts I've selected with a short piece from each: The Future of Learning is Not Training – January 25, 2017.

The Power of Beliefs

The Performance Improvement Blog

Beliefs shape work behavior and influence the culture of an organization. If you want a culture in which employees are learning, developing, and contributing to the organization’s success, you need to address the beliefs that they carry in their heads, and whether, according to Chris Argyris , their espoused theory (what they say they believe) and their theory-in-use (beliefs that direct actual behavior) are congruent.

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The role of instructional designer in social/informal learning

Spark Your Interest

One of the quandaries that instructional designers have been struggling with, is their role (if any) in informal or social learning. First of all, what exactly is informal and social learning? Informal – no set objective in terms of learning outcomes and is never intentional from the learner’s standpoint. Often, it is referred to as learning by experience or just as experience. An instructional designer’s role is to design instruction.

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Year in Review - 2013

The Performance Improvement Blog

The topics ranged from changing organizational culture to evaluating training programs to making managers responsible for employee learning to creating a learning culture. Here are the links with a short excerpt from each post: Culture Change is More Than Skin Deep. Culture change must confront the link between the thinking that drives behavior and the effects of that behavior on organizational success. Managers and Employee Learning .

Leaders Learning about Learning

The Performance Improvement Blog

I explained the limitations of formal training and the need for taking an organizational learning perspective. I argued that in order for any kind of learning intervention (training, coaching, mentoring, action learning, etc.) to have a positive impact on achieving the organization’s goals, managers had to take an active role in supporting learning. They wanted to know specifically what they could do to facilitate learning.

L&D's Role in the VUCA World: Part 1

ID Reflections

Each area is critical today in building an organization and an organizational culture that will not only attract the best employees but will also provide them with the necessary platform to give their best. An organization may attract the best and then lose them due to an overly repressive culture, a hierarchical structure or a closed environment. Here, I will explore the role of L&D in the VUCA ( volatility , uncertainty , complexity and ambiguity ) world.

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Independent Learner in the Knowledge Economy

The Performance Improvement Blog

In the Knowledge Economy, people must take responsibility for their own learning. They need to learn how to learn independently and how to learn what they need to know when they need to know it. While skills are still necessary for success, the focus should shift to cultivating the underlying capabilities that can accelerate learning so that new skills can be more rapidly acquired. And they can’t continue to support and reinforce that learning over time.

L&D Professionals: From Trainer to Learning Coach

The Performance Improvement Blog

The most important role of L&D professionals is to coach managers in facilitating learning in organizations. The days of instructor-centered employee learning are over. globalization, workforce diversity, hyper-competition, and demands of a new generation of workers make continuous learning the core activity of organizations today. Companies can no longer depend on L&D departments (and serendipity) to meet the evolving learning needs of employees.