How the 8 Effects of Arts Education Are Changing Online Pedagogy, Part 4

Kadenze

In this final vodcast of the series, Brad Haseman, Executive Vice President of Kadenze, Inc. discusses the distinctive effects arts-led learning is having on online learning design. You can view the three earlier vodcasts – Part 1 here , Part 2 here , and Part 3 here. Have you also noticed the same approach is used over and over to teach about ‘learning’? Digital Learning arts education online learning pedagogy

Myths about online learning

Janet Clarey

Daniel Lemire wrote a recent post, some myths about online teaching, based on his experiences in higher ed. I think many of these myths can be applied to corporate e-learning. I'm thinking here about a vodcast with group communication around its content. Or, a video in a classroom with active discussion.]. Myth : Online teaching is mostly good for introductory or low-level courses. Myth : Online courses will empty the classrooms. It’s not learning.

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How The 8 Effects of Arts Education Are Changing Online Pedagogy, Part 2

Kadenze

In this second of four vodcasts, Brad Haseman, Executive Vice President of Kadenze, Inc. s Director of Business Development, to discuss the distinctive effects arts-led learning is having on online learning design. By defining art as merely an imitation of ‘real’ things, he successfully reduced all discussion about the value and benefit of the arts into one question: “Does the art work fully represent the ideal version of this real thing?”

How the 8 Effects of Arts Education Are Changing Online Pedagogy, Part 3

Kadenze

In this third of four vodcasts, Brad Haseman, Executive Vice President of Kadenze, Inc. discusses the distinctive effects arts-led learning is having on online learning design. This third vodcast introduces three of the effects which artists and arts educators bring to processes of learning online. This aims to maximise learning by reducing the extraneous demands placed on learners as they process information on the screen.