Great and small

E-Learning Provocateur

One pertinent example for L&D practitioners is pedagogy (formerly paedagogie ) which derives from the Hellenic words paidos for “child” and agogos for “leader” This etymology underscores our use of the word when we mean the teaching of children.

How the 8 Effects of Arts Education Are Changing Online Pedagogy, Part 4

Kadenze

discusses the distinctive effects arts-led learning is having on online learning design. The answers to that question provides the substance for the eighth and final effect discussed in this series, the Mastery effect. This series has discussed the way eight learning effects drawn from the principles of arts education can be used to enrich online pedagogy. In 1770, Immanuel Kant wrote most tellingly on this in his discussion of the sublime in his Critique of Judgement.

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Andragogy vs. Pedagogy

Big Dog, Little Dog

Pedagogy is derived from the Greek words paid meaning “child&# and agogus meaning “leader of.&# In this pedagogy classroom, the teachers are responsible for all decisions about learning in that they decided what is to be learned, how it is to be learned, when it should be learned, and if it has been learned. They wanted to be able to discuss the growing body of knowledge about adult learners in parallel with pedagogy.

How our learning theories shape how we use technology for learning

Joitske Hulsebosch eLearning

I read a paper called Perspectives on learning and technology: A review of theoretical perspectives "This paper provides a review of literature pertaining to theoretical references on educational practice and technology from perspectives of learning theories of the 20th and 21st centuries." A learning theory (or theories) helps understand how people learn, thereby assisting educators, trainers and facilitators reflect on their educational practices.

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How the 8 Effects of Arts Education Are Changing Online Pedagogy, Part 3

Kadenze

discusses the distinctive effects arts-led learning is having on online learning design. It draws from Information Theory where redundancy refers to effects which deliberately seeks to produce ‘a surplus of signal over message’. Photo by W / Unsplash. In this third of four vodcasts, Brad Haseman, Executive Vice President of Kadenze, Inc. Here he introduces the Emergence, Coherence, and Artistic Redundancy effects. You can read Part 1 here and Part 2 here.

Narrative pedagogy 3: Problem solving

Learning with 'e's

In this short series (on what I will call 'narrative pedagogy'*) I'm exploring some of the storytelling techniques that can be adapted for use in education. The first post featured a technique called Interrupted Routine ; the second discussed Red Herrings in narrative. In Gestalt theory , all humans are assumed to have an innate psychological need to complete the incomplete, to close the circle. My use signifies how storytelling devices can be applied to everyday pedagogy.

Learning theories for the digital age

Learning with 'e's

I pointed out recently that many of the older theories of pedagogy were formulated in a pre-digital age. I blogged about some of the new theories that seem appropriate as explanatory frameworks for learning in a digital age. Is it now time for these new theories to replace the old ones? Are the old theories still adequate to describe the kinds of learning that we witness today in our hyper-connected world?

E-Learning Design Part 4: Learning through Collaboration

CDSM

At CDSM, we draw on a range of theories – from the past and the present – to form the method and practice behind our award-winning e-learning. This is known as our ‘ pedagogy ’. In our last post ( E-Learning Design Part 3: The Learner as an Active Participant ), we gave you an insight into how we use some of the essential aspects of the theory of ‘constructivism’ in our digital learning solutions. How Social Constructivism Informs CDSM’s Pedagogy.

E-Learning Design Part 2: Observable and Measurable Outcomes

CDSM

At CDSM, we draw on a range of theories – from the past and the present – to form the method and practice behind our award-winning e-learning. This is known as our ‘ pedagogy ’. In our last post ( E-Learning Design Part 1: Structure, Repetition and Reinforcement ), we gave you an insight into how we use some of the essential aspects of the theory of ‘behaviourism’ in our digital learning solutions.

E-Learning Design Part 3: The Learner as an Active Participant

CDSM

At CDSM, we draw on a range of theories – from the past and the present – to form the method and practice behind our award-winning e-learning. This is known as our ‘ pedagogy ’. Now, we’re going to introduce you to a theory which plays an even bigger part in our thinking: Constructivism. The theory also identifies the need for support in learning, something which is known as ‘scaffolding’.

How to Make Sure Your Course Meets Its Learning Objectives

CourseArc

” They follow rules, theories, or laws governing the objectives they espouse, and they measure the outcomes of their efforts against those objectives. For each of the learning units that learners will be exposed to, your mapping will offer an overview of the competencies required, the topics to be discussed, and the activities to be performed. Scientists, economists, accountants, and mathematicians all have one thing in common: they all deal in “absolutes.”

E-Learning Design Part 6: CDSM’s Active Learning Model™

CDSM

Throughout this series on e-learning design , we have looked at some of the learning theories that help to form the method and practice behind our award-winning e-learning. This is known as our ‘ pedagogy ’. At CDSM, we draw from a wide range of classical learning and contemporary memory theories – as varied as behaviourism , constructivism and social constructivism. Let’s take Bloom’s taxonomy as an example of a theory we utilise differently depending on circumstances.

Adult learning shminciples

E-Learning Provocateur

The theory. Since the 1960s, he articulated a distinction between pedagogy (the teaching of children) and andragogy (the teaching of adults). In many ways, Knowles’ description of pedagogy approximates instructivism, while his description of andragogy approximates constructivism. She also discusses their potential applications to e-learning, and responds to some of the criticisms that have been voiced over the years.

Connectivism and the modern learner

E-Learning Provocateur

So after several hours of unenlightened googling, I decided to bite the bullet, go back to first principles and read George Siemens’ seminal paper, Connectivism: A Learning Theory for the Digital Age. Siemens describes connectivism as “the integration of principles explored by chaos, network, and complexity and self-organisation theories&#. According to Chaos Theory , everything is connected, as illustrated so eloquently by the Butterfly Effect.

The battle for education

Learning with 'e's

As a result, there are many educational approaches, a myriad of theories and a bewildering number of perspectives. In Socratic discourse, no destination can be arrived at, nor can a definitive answer be found to any question, but other questions are generated and discussed. Social constructivist theory clearly derived from this set of tenets. EEVV351 Aristotle curriculum education idealism learning pedagogy philosophy realism socrates teaching theory

Teaching and learning through dialogue

Learning with 'e's

A few months ago, I wrote a blog post entitled '' Learning as dialogue '' which was essentially about how students can learn through conversation and by discussing their ideas with each other. Dr Ken Gale did this using nothing more than a whiteboard and pen, along with constant discussion and questioning. Ken simply pointed us in the direction of relevant reading, and strategically slipped the names of key theorists into his discussions with us.

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Instructivism, constructivism or connectivism?

E-Learning Provocateur

The popular sequence of events that I have recounted is often represented pictorially as a gradient, accompanied by that ubiquitous table comparing various aspects of the three pedagogies. Sure, the gradient reflects a wonderful growth of ideas, but I think it’s a trap to conclude that the latter pedagogies supersede the former. Why, in the midst of ever-advancing learning theory and progressive instructional design, does such rampant instructivism persist?

Communities and connections

Learning with 'e's

My opening keynote speech at the 29th annual EDEN conference at VIVES University of Applied Sciences in Bruges, Belgium earlier this week was given the title Connected pedagogies - Learning and teaching in the digital age. I also mentioned some of the emerging tools and technologies that are just becoming available, and speculated on how these might influence changes in pedagogy in the coming years. Photo by Airina Volungevi?ien?

Style counsel

E-Learning Provocateur

The theory. Critics of the theory don’t seem to challenge the existence of learning styles, but rather what the instructor does about them. If the learner is primarily auditory, you should talk to them and open up discussion. However, the research I have read about thus far has underwhelmed me, and the notion that a lack of evidence somehow invalidates the theory really grates me. Think about it: if you marry your pedagogy to your content, who does that suit?

Video: The power and the story

Learning with 'e's

As politely as I could, I explained to him that making his students sit through a full 90 minutes of video was not particularly good pedagogy. Notwithstanding the student attention issues, I explained that video can be at its most effective when it is used in short bursts as a stimulus to enrich and extend learning, to promote discussion, encourage collaboration and to challenge students' thinking - but definitely not as a replacement for the teacher.

Clark Quinn – Crystal Balling with Learnnovators

Learnnovators

It comprises stimulating discussions with industry experts and product evangelists on emerging trends in the learning landscape. Clark: I’m a strong believer in social constructivist pedagogies, e.g. problem-based and service learning, whereby a curriculum is activity, not content. It comprises stimulating discussions with industry experts and product evangelists on emerging trends in the learning landscape.

What is learner autonomy?

Docebo

This pedagogy is more about a learner’s ability to take charge of their own learning , learning styles, and goal-setting. Consider Malcolm Knowles’ adult learning theory , which outlines six key principles that are critical to the impact of learning: Learners need to know why, what, and how.

Blogging: Five of the best

Learning with 'e's

The Meaning Of Pedagogy (>62,000 views, 8 comments) This was a post I wrote in response to questions from my students while working at the Plymouth Institute of Education. One group asked what the origin of the word 'pedagogy' was, and as I explained, I realised that I needed to capture the idea behind 'leading someone to learning'. As you can see from the number of comments and discussion that ensued, the post certainly hit a nerve and got people talking.

#Learning is.

Learning with 'e's

From this, the many definitions and perspectives that were offered made me think that each could be elaborated on, supported with pedagogical theory and opened up for further discussion. I previously wrote on the subjects of the meaning of pedagogy and the meaning of education , and attempted to address the question ' what is learning ?' Aaron Davis education Geelong College learning pedagogy teaching Technology

Connected learning

Learning with 'e's

Through technology, we can connect not only with content but also context - people, resources and ideas, and we can also share our own ideas for discussion and further learning. There are many theories and constructs that can inform us of the nature and potential impact of connected learning. Jerome Bruner developed ZPD theory to include the concept of scaffolded learning. algorithm connected education learning pedagogy Scaffolding schema Technology ZPD

Learning from each other

Learning with 'e's

This approach to pedagogy has its roots in Vygotskiian Zone of Proximal Development theory , where a more knowledgeable other, whether teacher, adult or simply a better informed peer, can extend someone's learning experience beyond what they might achieve alone (Vygotsky, 1978). This is not something ZPD theory explicitly takes into account. collaborative learning learning pedagogy peer learning problem solving teaching Vygotsky ZPD

#LearningIs.

Learning with 'e's

From this, the many definitions and perspectives that were offered made me think that each could be elaborated on, supported with pedagogical theory and opened up for further discussion. I previously wrote on the subjects of the meaning of pedagogy and the meaning of education , and attempted to address the question ' what is learning ?' LearningIs Aaron Davis education Geelong College learning pedagogy teaching Technology

The anomie in our midst

Learning with 'e's

Photo from Maxpixel The French sociologist Emile Durkheim's study of suicide led to a theory that instability resulting in a breakdown of standards or social conventions can lead to alienation. In all probability, when there is a major disaster, or a global incident that is covered extensively by news channels, teachers can take the opportunity to discuss these with their students, and turn them into teachable moments.

Praxis makes perfect

Learning with 'e's

Today we discussed praxis. My explanation is that praxis is at the nexus - the overlap - between theory and practice. Praxis is the essence of what happens when theory is applied to practice, and can be simplified in this Venn diagram. Theory without action is just theory. Action without theory can be just as hollow. How can you justify your actions and decisions in the classroom, if you have no theory to support you?

The kids are all right

Learning with 'e's

Too often we gather to discuss education, to expound on learning theories and to congratulate ourselves for our pedagogical prowess, and yet we miss the crucial element, the context which should be central to everything we do. Read this blog over the next few days, and we as a blogging team will report to you from EDEN on what is being said, discussed, explored. Technology pedagogy #edenoslo education learning school EDEN Conference Friedrich Nietzsche

Best Practices for Effective Online Course Development

Hurix Digital

Pedagogy has since long been an overly debated subject. The phenomenon of digitalization has arguably gifted pedagogy its greatest strength, i.e., online learning. People study for many reasons.

A Different Approach to Adult Learning Design

Raptivity

Pedagogy is how you teach children and Andragogy is how you teach adults. Adult learners appreciate practical knowledge than theory. Here are some things which mapped to what Rick Stated: 1) The company was creating strategic plans for next year and the sample had an immediate value in that discussion. So how do adults learn? And how is it different from the learning designed for children?

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ID and eLearning Links 7/9/19

Experiencing eLearning

Constructivism is a theory of learning, not a theory of pedagogy. tags: constructivism neuroscience schema pedagogy learningtheories. Designing a Custom Progress Bar in Articulate Storyline – Building Better Courses Discussions – E-Learning Heroes Free widget for creating a custom progress bar in Storyline.

Is Having Fun in Higher Education the Way Forward?

KnowledgeOne

So in 2020, amid the COVID-19 pandemic, when the transition to online education highlighted some of the limitations of traditional education, they decided to create a space for discussion, experience sharing and creativity to encourage the use of play and fun in higher education.

eLearning Book Review: The Accidental Instructional Designer

Web Courseworks

Using the concept of a pie, she explains the importance of learning theory, creativity, technology, and business acumen as part of a holistic model that puts the role of an instructional designer into perspective. While solid task analysis and pedagogy is important, it is not the only “design” consideration when technology and business goals are involved. Cammy uses this approach as a launching point for a discussion of best practices in a variety of areas.

The Emergence of Learning Engineering

Knowledge Avatars for Training

Learning Engineering is an emerging field that applies science, technology, and pedagogy to produce the most effective learning experience. The origins of Learning Engineering can be traced back to the 1940s with Claude Shannon's Information Theory.

Brain Learning and eLearning Design

The Learning Circuits

There's been a lot of discussion around cognitive theory and "how the brain learns." But even with all of that discussion there's a question of whether people are really making changes to the design of their online learning. So the July Question is: Does the discussion of "how the brain learns" impact your eLearning design? David Grebow suggested this month's Big Question (thanks David).

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What a MOOC Is and What It Isn’t

Your Training Edge

This is unsurprising for two reasons: MOOCs have changed considerably since they first came out, and they are continuing to evolve as both the pedagogies and the technologies. What this signifies is that the courses are generally constructed using a common set of building blocks, such as bite-sized learning modules, video content delivery, and online discussion forums. Massive open online courses (MOOCs) are the education and training story of this decade (at least so far).

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MOOCs: Where We’ve Been, Where We Are, and Where We’re Headed

Your Training Edge

The theory behind this initial MOOC viewed knowledge as distributed and education as a process of building personal learning networks. The courses offered through these platforms were fundamentally different from the 2008 MOOC experiment, more closely mirroring the traditional classroom experience, with lectures, discussions, and tests that consisted mostly of multiple-choice questions.

MOOCs Treat All Learners the Same

Your Training Edge

The course was based on the theory of connectivism, which Downes has defined as “the thesis that knowledge is distributed across a network of connections, and therefore that learning consists of the ability to construct and traverse those networks.”. There was also the possibility of participating in online discussions, but, not surprisingly, many found it difficult to hold a meaningful conversation with tens of thousands of other people. Discussions may or may not be required.