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Organizational Learning Tools

The Performance Improvement Blog

What are the tools of organizational learning? As I’ve stated in a previous blog post , a high performing organization needs a comprehensive approach to learning and a set of tools to facilitate learning. A training program, or an educational event, or even a CEO’s speech about the importance of learning is not enough. These categories of learners and tools translate into a four by three matrix of learners and learning tools.

Organizational Learning Engineering

Clark Quinn

Organizational learning processes – across L&D, Executive Development, Leadership Development, and more of the roles in HR and talent management – are largely still rooted in both industrial era models and myths. We see practices that don’t make sense, and we’re not aligned with what we now know about how we think, work, and learn. And this is a problem for organizational success.

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How to Achieve an Organizational Learning Goal

The Performance Improvement Blog

You can apply these same principles to organizational learning goals. For individuals, teams, and whole organizations to achieve their learning goals, they need to develop supportive processes and relationships. And it’s not enough to select a method for learning. To apply and sustain that learning, you must also establish processes and relationships that support learning and application of that learning.

LearnTrends: Reinventing Organizational Learning

Experiencing eLearning

These are my live blogged notes from Jay Cross & Clark Quinn’s LearnTrends session on Reinventing Organizational Learning. Article they wrote for CLO mag: “Become a Chief Meta-Learning Officer&#. If you don’t know the solution & need to network/collaborate to find it, that’s learning. Internet Learning Alliance: They were all working independently, decided to work together and practice what they preach. improve learning process.

Uberizing Organizational Learning – Thinking Beyond Courses

ID Reflections

We have to think agile, instant, accessible, contextual, micro-sized, real time… We need to uberize organizational learning. Uberization ” has taken off as the new term that according to me has come to stand for – disruption, innovation, lean operating model, harnessing of the affordances of the sharing economy, and a hyper-connected world driven by imagination and creativity where everything is a mobile-click away – including learning. Learning is no exception.

Organizational Learning Is A Social Act

CLO Magazine

We make many assumptions about organizational learning. On the surface we seem to know what organizational learning is: People attend programs or complete e-learning modules, they learn something new and they somehow become better. But this approach doesn’t represent how people in organizations actually learn. Hence we see massive failures across the board in the effectiveness of organizational learning.

Keep Growing Your Organizational Learning Pyramid

CLO Magazine

An Inclusive Learning Growth Pyramid. Some organizations provide myriad opportunities for learning at different levels of the organizational pyramid. An inclusive learning pyramid would help employees at every level to learn the relevant skills and grow to the next level. Careers are no longer narrowly defined by jobs and skills but through experiences and learning agility.”. Onboarding forms the base of the inclusive learning growth pyramid.

Four False Assumptions About Leadership Development

The Performance Improvement Blog

Deloitte has identified “leadership development” as a major challenge for HR leaders in 2015. From this study, they conclude: Organizations around the world are struggling to strengthen their leadership pipelines, yet over the past year businesses fell further behind, particularly in their ability to develop Millennial leaders. We put them through intense one-shot programs and expect them to become high performers. and then applying that new found learning.

Stop Training Leaders and Start Developing Leadership

The Performance Improvement Blog

[This post first appeared on the Learning to be Great Blog.]. A study by PwC found that only eight percent of senior executives can be considered strategic leaders, defined as “effective at leading transformations.” Jessica Leitch, David Lancefield, and Mark Dawson, all of PwC UK, have identified “10 Principles of Strategic Leadership” that, when implemented, create the conditions for the development of strategic leaders. Encourage strategic leaders to learn from each other.

Benefits of Strategic Leadership Tools

The Performance Improvement Blog

Just as a carpenter wouldn’t build a house without a blueprint, saw, hammer, and screwdriver, a leader shouldn’t try to build an organization without the methods and processes that facilitate organizational learning and change. The task is no longer personal; it’s about following the tool’s process to achieve organizational success; it''s not about any one person’s agenda. Employee Engagement Leadership Management Organizational Learning Teamwork

Essentials of Developing an Organizational Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

Are employees constantly looking for more opportunities to learn and grow both in your company and in other organizations? Are you not getting the impact on organizational performance that you would like from current training programs? Are project teams as effective as they need to be at planning, decision-making, problem-solving, collaborating, and getting results?

Rapid Performance Improvement: The Two-Minute Drill

The Performance Improvement Blog

Most organization change efforts fail because they lack clarity of focus, leadership, a sense of urgency, a solid plan, preparation, the right people, the right resources, execution and follow-through, measurement and feedback, and organizational learning.

The Unexamined Leadership Program is Not Worth Doing

The Performance Improvement Blog

If you’re not going to evaluate a leadership development program, don’t do the program! I’m talking about a systematic, evidence-based look at why it was done, what was done, how it was done, what happened as a result, how it can be improved, and what the organization learned from the process. Validation that the correct learning solution has been identified and suggestions for programme improvement. I would add: Reinforcement of learning.

Improving Communication in High Performance Organizations

The Performance Improvement Blog

My colleagues, Leslie Stambaugh and Jim Stilwell, and I have published an ebook to illustrate principles and best practices of effective communication in organizations. The communication problem bucket is very large, making it quite easy to pour most organizational concerns into it. Planning for Organizational Change. Building Support for Organizational Change. Organizational Transparency. Building Trust in Leadership.

This Is What I Believe About Learning in Organizations

The Performance Improvement Blog

The Purpose of Business is Learning. But none of this is possible without learning. At its core, any high performing organization is about learning; continually using new information to become smarter, better, and more effective. Training Is Not Learning.

No Time to Learn

The Performance Improvement Blog

One of the concerns that worry training and learning professionals most about leading culture change in their organizations is that managers will say that they don’t have time to facilitate and support employee development. These managers don’t value learning. Maybe there was a time when you could learn a set of skills in your youth and then build a career around those abilities. The only way to keep pace and maybe even get ahead of the curve is to keep learning.

Demystifying Working Out Loud

Learnnovators

In this post, I want to demystify working out loud and highlight the organizational as well as personal growth that accrues from the practice. I am a huge believer of the practice because I have experienced the effect first hand. It has helped me to develop my personal learning network (PLN) and enabled my PKM. Given this VUCA world, it is imperative for and incumbent on all of us to remain learning agile and relevant.

Why Your Organization Needs a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

A learning culture is a community of workers continuously and collectively seeking performance improvement through new knowledge, new skills, and new applications of knowledge and skills to achieve the goals of the organization. A learning culture is a culture of inquiry; an environment in which employees feel safe challenging the status quo and taking risks to enhance the quality of what they do for customers, themselves, and other stakeholders. They want to learn!

16 Signs of a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

How do you know your organization has a learning culture ? How will people be learning? While a learning culture is an environment that’s always being developed, certain signs indicate that you are making progress. In a learning culture…. Leaders are communicating the importance of learning (acquiring new knowledge, skills, and capabilities) and holding managers accountable for learning and applying that learning to making a difference for the organization.

Learning to be Great Organizations

The Performance Improvement Blog

In a previous post , I wrote about the importance of democratizing organizational learning. I argued that organizations need to be continuously learning for the purpose of improving performance and achieving business goals. And in another post I wrote that for this to happen, organizational leaders need tools. That is, they need methods for learning from the organization and for learning how to learn from the organization.

Pull, Don’t Push, Employee Learning

The Performance Improvement Blog

As the digital revolution continues to fuel the faster rate of change, transforming all aspects of business, from supply chain management to communication, the highest-performing corporations are abandoning traditional “push” training for the “pull” learning model. In a push training model, learning is test-based. The shelf life of both, compared to today, was almost glacial, and most workers did not need to learn volumes of information to perform their jobs.

Agile Learner; Agile Leader

The Performance Improvement Blog

I have to admit that prior to hearing Elliott Masie talk about “learning agility” last week at the virtual Human Captial Media Symposium for CLOs , the concept was not on my radar. However, aspiring to be agile myself (mentally and physically), I’m willing to learn something new and, maybe, discard some old notions about human development and leadership. It appears that there are at least three definitions of learning agility being used in the field.

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Becoming a Learning Culture: Competing in an Age of Disruption

The Performance Improvement Blog

Any company, faced with these kinds of disruptive forces must keep learning. Employees must learn how to use new computers and new apps, how to operate new, high tech machinery, how to be responsive to customer demands, how to create innovative products and services, how to manage a multi-cultural, multi-generational workforce, how to work effectively in cross-functional teams, and how to plan for a future that is constantly in flux. Learning is just-in-time, on-demand.

Are Managers Too Busy to Learn?

The Performance Improvement Blog

One of the barriers to creating and sustaining a learning culture in organizations is the no-time myth. Managers resist attending formal training events and participating in other kinds of learning activities (elearning, mentoring, coaching, action-learning, communities of practice, internal wikis, etc.) Kieran suggests that if managers were less task-focused and ran better meetings, they would have more time and, therefore, would be more likely to attend learning events.

Top 10 Questions to Evaluate a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

In a discussion started by Camilla Keen on LinkedIn, she asks, “In order to find out and evaluate if a company has an effective learning culture, what would be your top ten questions?” I commented: Are leaders communicating the importance of learning (acquiring new knowledge, skills, and capabilities) and holding managers accountable for learning and applying that learning to making a difference for the organization?

Imagine a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

Imagine a company that, in the face of unprecedented change, is continually learning how to learn fast: managing tremendous amounts of information; creating new products and processes in response to global competition; using new apps to be more efficient and effective; and being responsive to learning preferences of a multi-generational and diverse workforce. They have a history of taking responsibility for their own learning.

Eight Leader Habits of a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

Eight leader habits are essential to a learning culture. These are behaviors ingrained in the routines and rituals of organizations that are continually learning and learning how to learn. Leaders in these organizations do the following: Send the message - Leaders communicate the importance of learning to the organization. Build trust - Employees will invest time and effort in learning if they trust their managers. This learning cannot be left to chance.

Harry Levinson 1922-2012

The Performance Improvement Blog

We lost one of the giants in the study of organizational learning and performance this week. Harry Levinson died at the age of 90 after a long and productive career making organizational leaders aware of the importance of psychological dynamics to their employees and themselves. Levinson was one of the first to speak about the impact of organizational culture on worker performance. Levinson had some strong words for organizational consultants.

Imagining Workplaces of Tomorrow: Managing Minds

The Performance Improvement Blog

Imagine a company in which: Continuous learning, and learning fast, is key, even in the face of unprecedented change: managing tremendous amounts of information, creating new products and processes in response to global competition, using new apps to be more efficient and effective, and responding to the learning preferences of a multigenerational, diverse workforce. Employees are hired because they are excited about learning and improving themselves.

Imagining Workplaces of Tomorrow: Managing Minds

The Performance Improvement Blog

Imagine a company in which: Continuous learning, and learning fast, is key, even in the face of unprecedented change: managing tremendous amounts of information, creating new products and processes in response to global competition, using new apps to be more efficient and effective, and responding to the learning preferences of a multigenerational, diverse workforce. Employees are hired because they are excited about learning and improving themselves.

The Great Training Robbery Continues

The Performance Improvement Blog

When I ask the training and development leaders who participate in my ATD Essentials of Developing an Organizational Learning Culture workshop to say what percentage of employees who attend training programs actually apply what they’ve learned on the job, the answers range from about 10% to about 50%, with most at the lower end of that range. He was talking about the failure of leadership training to have a significant impact on companies.

How to Create a Learning Culture in Start-Ups and Small Businesses

The Performance Improvement Blog

How We Built a Workplace People Love , explains what small companies and departments in large organizations can do to create a learning culture. He addresses fear, reward systems, hiring, on-boarding, learning, making mistakes, and experimenting. We must come to grips with the role that "manufactured fear" plays as a technique for increasing performance in teams. These are the true signs of a learning organization. No learning.

Organization Culture Change

The Performance Improvement Blog

In the online course that I teach for ASTD on Developing an Organizational Learning Culture , one of the questions I hear most often is, “How can I change the culture in my company when there is little support from management and our unions resist any change that might affect the work rules?” Organizational culture guru Edgar Schein said it best: “Either you manage the culture, or it manages you.” Some think the change must be more targeted at organizational leverage points.

Learning Culture: A Workplace Environment for Success (Part Two)

The Performance Improvement Blog

In the second part of a two-part article I wrote for BusinessThinker.com titled, Learning Culture: A Workplace Environment for Success , I describe what organizations can do to develop a learning culture. We have learned from the Gallup Organization’s 20 year-long research project that the most significant relationships in any organization is between managers and their direct reports. Managers are the gatekeepers to individual and team learning.

Year in Review - 2014

The Performance Improvement Blog

Throughout 2014, I used this blog to illuminate important leadership and management issues. The topics ranged from the problems with performance reviews to managing temporary workers to innovation to developing a learning culture in organizations. Here are the links with a short excerpt from each post: Eight Leader Habits of a Learning Culture. Eight leader habits are essential to a learning culture. The World is Fast.And Learning Must Be Faster.

Learning in a Managing Minds Company

The Performance Improvement Blog

The future of how we learn in our organizations is a popular topic. But unless you are responsible for developing, delivering, managing, and measuring training and learning, keeping up with the latest learning technologies can be overwhelming. The training and learning technology discussions miss the point. Our approach is to suggest new ways of facilitating learning that fit into managing minds. Learning independently. Learning interactively.

Learning in a Managing Minds Company

The Performance Improvement Blog

The future of how we learn in our organizations is a popular topic. But unless you are responsible for developing, delivering, managing, and measuring training and learning, keeping up with the latest learning technologies can be overwhelming. The training and learning technology discussions miss the point. Our approach is to suggest new ways of facilitating learning that fit into managing minds. Learning independently. Learning interactively.