HTML5—What’s the Urgency?

The Learning Circuits

I’m starting to get some questions along the lines of, “We’ve been hearing we need to switch to HTML5 delivery, and we’d like to be forward-thinking, but why and when should we do it?” In that case, there is urgency to consider something other than a Flash-based solution. If those don’t suit your needs for interactivity, you’ll probably want to check out some of the existing HTML5 authoring tools.

Helpful Tip: Interactive Video in Adobe Captivate 8

eLearning Brothers

Before we discuss interactive video in Adobe Captivate 8, we need to discuss a little bit about HTML5 video. While HTML5 video has its advantages — such as cross-platform and browser-native support — it still lags in respect to previous, plugin-supported video.

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Authoring Tool Market – What I am seeing

eLearning 24-7

HTML5 output. Right now I am doing a survey on authoring tools (more on this at the end of the post) and so far 100% of all respondents state that HTML5 output is required in an authoring tool. I do believe that HTML5 output will continue to grow as an authoring tool feature. It is time to realize that Flash output just isn’t enough anymore for folks. HTML5 templates. The magic 8 ball is a fun item to use.

JOE GANCI – CRYSTAL BALLING WITH LEARNNOVATORS

Learnnovators

As an example, HTML5 was added to most development tools only after it was clear that Flash was on its way out and as it became evident that more people were browsing the web on their mobile devices than on their desktop computers. ABOUT JOE GANCI (President, eLearningJoe, LLC).

Joe Ganci – Crystal Balling with Learnnovators

Learnnovators

As an example, HTML5 was added to most development tools only after it was clear that Flash was on its way out and as it became evident that more people were browsing the web on their mobile devices than on their desktop computers. Eventually, we were able to do away with that hardware player when QuickTime and other digital video formats became available. Problems include smaller screens, no roll-over interactions, and no Flash animations.