Folksonomies, memes and misunderstanding

Learning with e's

Taking issue with it in his blogpost he says: "A folksonomy loses its qualities as a folksonomy once you have someone 'organising' it, and will quickly become a taxonomy." Memes are units of information or ideas that are transmitted from mind to mind through speech, written word or, more than likely in the digital age, through a social network. The Holistic Web blogpost Taxonomy vs Folksonomy says it all really - a taxonomy is predictable, whereas a folksonomy is flexible.

Museums and Folksonomies

Skilful Minds

A folksonomy results from distinct ways of organizing cultural categories developed from the tags, keywords, people use to describe specific content, or services, on the web. The emphasis in folksonomies is on organizing data, not making friends. social networking Tags: Customer Communities Social Networks Web 2.0

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#40years of educational technology: Social media

Learning with 'e's

By 2006 several social networking sites were enjoying surges in popularity, including MySpace, Bebo and of course, Facebook. Social media lend themselves naturally to support learning through discussions, collaboration and sharing. They are vital components of the web, and social media are important for education - because learning is essentially social and personal. Social media is one of the most versatile, and very personal technologies available to teachers.

Social Bookmarking: Your Favorites Really Want to be Free

Mike Taylor

Social bookmarking can solve all of those problems and bring you additional benefits you probably haven’t even thought of. Your first question may be, “What the heck is social bookmarking?”. TLDR: If you’re short on time grab this quick start guide to social bookmarking. What is Social Bookmarking? Social bookmarking is a better way to save the websites and online resources you want to keep track of. Social bookmarks are fantastic for L&D pros.

The changing Web

Learning with 'e's

Social media - often referred to as Web 2.0 , or the participatory Web - is shaping up to be one of the most important tool sets available to support the promotion of change in education. Almost everyone, it seems, is using some element of social media in the planning, development, delivery, management or evaluation of teaching and learning. Debate focuses on whether the emerging social applications constitute a sea change or revolution in the Web (cf.

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Theories for the digital age: Postmodern perspectives

Learning with 'e's

Folksonomy Flaneur rhizomatic learning social web hyperlink nomad education digital media learning post modernismPostmodernist views of society can be appropriated as lenses to analyse the personalised use of digital technology. Consumers of Web based content tend to search randomly and nomadically, due to the multi-layered, multi-directional nature of hyperlinked media and this aligns neatly with some post modern theory.

Semantic technologies and learning

Learning with e's

This is nicely facilitated by Social Web technologies (e.g. blogs and wikis), which better enable learning environments to support principles of social constructivism. collaborative tagging, social networking, mash-ups, and wikis), lightweight representation of semantics and metadata is used in the form of folksonomies, user comments, and ratings. Collaborative tagging and folksonomies for multimedia learning objects.

Learning pathways

Learning with 'e's

The advent of social media, mobile communications and digital media facilitate large, unbounded personal learning networks that mimic the characteristics of rhizomes. There is also evidence that learning communities informally decide their own priorities, often observed in the emerging folksonomies that result when digital content is organised, shared and curated. Folksonomy heutagogy education knowledge learning school rhizome

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Up Pompey

Learning with e's

I hope to explore some of the possibilities and potential of tools such as blogs, wikis, microblogs and aggregators, and will also explore mashups, social tagging, and concepts such as 'wisdom of crowds' and folksonomies. Tags: Manish Malik Folksonomy blog Web 2.0 When I was a lot younger I was a guitarist in a rock band. We were touring in 1982, and one of our bookings took us to play in the main hall of Portsmouth Polytechnic.

The social impact of disruptive technology

Learning with e's

I am very much interested in learning psychology, in the way people behave, how they perceive technology and how they use it in teaching and learning, and I have learnt from my research that there are and always will be many people who are resistant to change or reticent about it, because disruptive technologies challenge their social and professional roles. Do you think this has a big social impact?

Building Your Upskilling Strategy: Data vs. People

Degreed

World Economic Forum, based on the McKinsey Global Institute, looks at five categories of skills: physical and manual skills, basic cognitive skills, higher cognitive skills, social and emotional skills, and technological skills.

LearnTrends: Microlearning

Experiencing eLearning

folksonomy rather than standardization. Very few companies have strategy for social media–many say it won’t work in their culture. Control of these infrastructures and services presuppose a signifcant level of economic enfranchisement and social integration, and technical and communicative competency.&#. These are my live blogged notes from Janet Clarey’s LearnTrends session on Microlearning. My side comments are in italics.

The survival of higher education (2): Changing times

Learning with 'e's

or the ‘social web’. and provide some examples of current pedagogical practice using the Social Web. Debate centres upon whether the emerging social applications constitute a sea change or revolution in the Web (cf. Personally, I find myself in agreement with Brian Winston (2003), preferring to view social applications as a facet of gradual evolution rather than symptoms of sudden revolution. Essentially, the Web has become more social.

Data, People, or Something In Between: Clearing Your Path to Career Mobility

Degreed

World Economic Forum, based on the McKinsey Global Institute, looks at five categories of skills: physical and manual skills, basic cognitive skills, higher cognitive skills, social and emotional skills, and technological skills.

Parabolic learning

Learning with 'e's

We have previously explored a number of learning theories, new learning technologies, concepts around crowdsourcing, wisdom of crowds, folksonomies and user generated content, Web 2.0, The incorporation of a number of social media tools into the mix proved to be an amazing platform from which the students and I could reflect on the process of learning, and amplify our ideas to each other and the world.

eLearning Topics

Tony Karrer

When you look at the keywords on the left you see things like: Social Learning (356) Social Media (411) Twitter (725) Google Wave (22) Camtasia (76) Adobe Captivate (71) Social Network (460) Now, the content set in this case are highly skewed towards innovators as compared to the topic sets being used by my past analysis (training conferences). I've done a few posts in the past that take a look at the topics that are Hot Topics in Training.

Learning Solutions day 3: Saved the best for the last #LS2011

Challenge to Learn

We talked about social media and how it will affect learning, we talked about how to bring learning closer to the workplace, we discussed whether or not the role of an e-Learning professional would change from a writer to somebody who moderates and gathers information and then will structure and republish it. I believe for myself that social media and web 3.0 And if that is not enough they connected these two to Ontologies, Taxonomies, Folksonomies and controled vocabularies.

Learning theories for the digital age

Learning with 'e's

Do we need them to describe and frame what is currently happening in an age where everyone is as connected as they wish to be, where social media are the new meeting places, and where mobile telephones are pervading every aspect of our lives. How can we for example describe learning activities such as blogging, social networking, crowd sourced learning, or user generated content such as Wikipedia and YouTube using older theories?

More rogue.

Janet Clarey

She writes that while organizations are trying to figure out how to use social media in a formalized ( more on that later) way, the rogue employee just does it , “it&# being participating in mutually beneficial dialogue about the company with the general public. So why formalize social media (in my mind a highly informal way to learn)? Tags: Brandon Hall informal learning nonformal learning Social Media twitter

Next generation learning

Learning with 'e's

before social media) and Learning 2.0. is socially much richer and more participatory, and relies more on interaction with other learners than any previous learning approach. Social media are enabling learners everywhere to connect and work together with each other, forming convenient communities and networks of shared interest. has seen as shift toward user generated content, and the emergent property of folksonomies.

Finders keepers, losers weepers

Clive on Learning

The alternative, of course, is a bottom-up effort whereby users apply their own tags to online content, evolving in the process what are now commonly known as folksonomies. Peter quotes David Sifry: Unlike rigid taxonomy schemes that people dislike, the ease of tagging for personal organisation with social incentives leads to a rich and discoverable folksonomy. Intelligence is provided by real people from the bottom-up to aid social discovery.

Many encounters

Learning with e's

tools (I demonstrated the wisdom of crowds, folksonomies and social tagging through a number of 'get out of your seat' activities which seemed to go down well) and problem based learning. I had a very busy, and slightly bizarre day today filled with encounters. Started the morning off having breakfast with Informal Learning guru Jay Cross in the lounge of the K-West hotel, in Kensington, West London.

The architecture of learning

Learning with 'e's

Social tagging for example, is becomes increasingly stronger as people populate it with content and links. The emergent properties of content organisation are folksonomies, and are the product of loose organised that is bottom-up rather than top-down. environments might is social constructivism , because learners increasingly rely on social interaction, and appropriate tools to mediate dialogue. One of the characteristics of Web 2.0,

EDEN saw play.

Learning with e's

Tom Wambeke's (KATHO, Belgium) session entitled 'Educational Blogging: in search of a general taxonomy', concluded that folksonomies were less hierarchical and more appropriate measures of blogs. Deborah Everhart (Georgetown University, USA) followed, with a session on social bookmarking, using Blackboard MLE tools. Now I've had time to reflect upon the EDEN Conference in Napoli last week, I can report that it was a successful conference.

Pinterest? Not a fan.but I'm paying attention.the Re-Rise of the Visual

Mark Oehlert

I'm watching long-time visual people/expertise matchers like introNetworks provide in-depth integration with enterprise-grade social media platforms like Social Text. Remember when people thought that stuff like folksonomies and tagging and wikis and blogs and micro-blogging and activity streams and GAMES would NEVER get inside the corporate firewall? I think I have a Pinterest account. I may have pinned something at some time.

Twitter ye not

Learning with e's

That's the power of the social network. All you are doing by advocating that Twitter groups are not necessary is imposing a structure upon the social web that should not be imposed. We want folksonomy not heirarchy. Don't impose rules on the social web. (Er, All social web tools have their own affordances and constraints. This time yesterday I searched Twitter Groups to see if anyone had created an Edublog group I could join. I didn't find one.

Learning and KM: Separated at birth?

Jay Cross

A social media consumer, HBS professor, MIT research scientist, and author, McAfee focuses on how emergent social software platforms are benefiting enterprises, and how smart organizations and their leaders are making effective use of them to share knowledge, inspire innovation, and enable decision making. Hear how microblogging is > being used in the enterprise and about other social media tools to connect people, enhance knowledge sharing, and enable collaboration.

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December's BIG QUESTION!!! Part I

Corporate eLearning Strategies and Development

Podcasting, videocasting, Corporate YouTube, Tagging, folksonomies vs. taxonomies, social networking, are a few of the elements that make up the new ecosystem we called Learning2.0. What will you remember most about 2006? I've been planning my year in review post and just noticed THE BIG QUESTION. 2006 has been a GREAT year! I have several events to be remembered but most importantly 2006 will be remembered as the year of The Learning Triad: blogs, wikis, and RSS.