Surfing the Net: Waste of Time or Personal Directed Learning.

Dashe & Thomson

Social Learning Blog Training and Performance Improvement in the Real World Home About Bios Subscribe to RSS Surfing the Net: Waste of Time or Personal Directed Learning? by Paul on April 13, 2011 in Informal Learning , social learning Last week my girlfriend and I ate dinner at Darbar Indian Grill in Uptown Minneapolis with another couple (good food, but overpriced), and we got on the topic of surfing the net on the job. Brain Rules for Learning: Who Knew?

Top 60 eLearning Posts for October 2010

eLearning Learning Posts

The art of Twitter , October 11, 2010 Learning how to use Twitter as a tool to develop your personal learning network is not always simple, and as with any other social networking tools, there is an unwritten protocol. Top 100 Tools for Learning 2010: Final list, presentation and more , October 18, 2010 Yesterday I finalised the Top 100 Tools for Learning 2010 list. Specifically, m-learning? This may be because designers only know about the Kirkpatrick “Levels.”

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Revamping 70-20-10

CLO Magazine

There is a core set of frameworks that support the way organizational learning and development is conducted. Many of these, such as the Kirkpatrick evaluation levels, carrot and stick motivational programs and the ADDIE model have been around since the 1960s. The Kirkpatrick framework made sense in a world based on courses and classrooms. The world of mobile and social learning and Google, however, requires new measures.

The Ultimate Glossary of eLearning Terms

LearnUpon

Active Learning. Active learning is a strategy focused on encouraging learners to actively participate in training. Examples of active learning activities include practical tasks and problem-solving conducted in small groups. It’s a five-phase framework that instructional designers use; a guideline for building effective training and learning support tools. In today’s fast-paced learning environments, the AGILE method is often seen as more efficient than ADDIE.