The Learning Styles Myth

Association eLearning

Some time ago, a colleague of mine wrote a blog called Learning Myths: Debunked , in which he stated that learning styles is a myth. Having obtained a degree in Elementary Education, I was shocked and still skeptical that learning styles was indeed a myth. As a student, I was consistently challenged to find new ways to teach a subject based on learning styles. The post The Learning Styles Myth appeared first on Knowledge Direct.

Multi-Modal Learning Isn’t Learning Styles

Association eLearning

Several of my colleagues have already written about learning styles being debunked and proven to be a myth. This post is about an alternate method, called multi-modal learning, which is not a myth. It can be easily confused with learning styles, so I feel that it deserves some clarification. What is Multi-Modal Learning? That’s the basics behind multi-modal learning. Why Does it Get Confused With Learning Styles?

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Do Learning Styles Matter?

Integrated Learnings

At first, learning styles seemed to be a hot topic because theorists were interested in defining various style typologies and prescribing instructional implications. Hence, we have a lot of literature describing modalities, brain hemisphere preferences, Kolb’s styles, Gregorc’s styles, and more. Lately, a lot of folks are writing about the fallacy of learning styles. So, is it worth learning about learning styles? By Shelley A.

Learning theories

Ed App

Five Current Learning Theories. Learning theories unpack complex cognitive processes and provide useful mental models for educators to structure and design courses around, while also providing insights on best practice during and after learning experiences.

Can learning theories lead to better elearning content? 

Creativ Technologies

The learning theories can take your e-learning content in a new direction because they can improve its comprehension. So, many learning theories can ensure that learners take a lot of interest in the content. Skinner advocated this theory.

Importance of Adults Learning Theory for Corporates – Blooms Taxonomy

Swift eLearning Services

What is adult learning and why it matters in corporate training? Will adults learn in the same way as the children learn? Where can we apply the adults learning theory? What is bloom’s taxonomy and why it came into existence in adult learning?

Bloom 44

Constructivism 5: Kolb’s Learning Styles

The E-Learning Curve

In the years since Kolb first devised the learning styles inventory, the definitions of the four learning styles have been refined to facilitate the creation of a learning styles matrix, which can assist in understanding learning. Continue Reading → The post Constructivism 5: Kolb’s Learning Styles appeared first on E-Learning Curve Blog.

Constructivism Pt.4: Experiential Learning Theory

The E-Learning Curve

Experiential learning theory (ELT) describes learning as “the process whereby knowledge is created through the transformation of experience”. ELT attempts to express the holistic nature of the learning process can be described as a learning model in that it attempts to integrate 'feeling' and 'thinking'. Experiential Learning Theory appeared first on E-Learning Curve Blog.

Characteristics of Experiential Learning Styles

The E-Learning Curve

Kolb’s use of the term “learning styles” has nothing to do with VAK learning styles; if you’re interested in scientifically dubious nonsense, look elsewhere. Continue Reading → The post Characteristics of Experiential Learning Styles appeared first on E-Learning Curve Blog.

What is Adult Learning Theory?

LearnUpon

Every trainer’s ambition is to make corporate learning as impactful and engaging as possible. Adult Learning Theory, also known as a ndragogy is a concept that has been around for years. It highlights the distinct ways adults best respond to learning and it’s a must-know for any training provider. Adult learning is a relatively simple theory to grasp, so let’s explain what it is and how its principles can be applied to your corporate learning strategy.

More on defining e-learning, elearning, eLearning…

The E-Learning Curve

We define e-learning as the continuous assimilation of knowledge and skills by adults stimulated by synchronous and asynchronous learning events – and sometimes Knowledge management outputs – which are authored, delivered engaged with, supported and administered using internet technologies. Continue Reading → The post More on defining e-learning, elearning, eLearning… appeared first on E-Learning Curve Blog.

Cognitive Bias in Learning: An Overview

Dashe & Thomson

Performance Improvement Learning Theory Learning Retention Instructor-Led Training Learning Style Employee Training and PerformanceWhat Are Cognitive Biases? Our brains receive non-stop input from all five senses every moment we are awake. In the face of this enormous amount of daily input, our brains develop subconscious coping mechanisms that we can use to quickly make daily decisions. Cognitive biases result when these coping mechanisms fail.

Characteristics of Experiential Learning Styles

The E-Learning Curve

Kolb’s use of the term “learning styles” has nothing to do with VAK learning styles; if you’re interested in scientifically dubious nonsense, look elsewhere. Characteristics of Experiential Learning Styles is a post from: E-Learning Curve Blog.

Unleashing Superheroes – Learning Style

Growth Engineering

This week I explore how tapping into different learning styles lets you build engaging online training for different types of learner and Unleash Superheroes in your organisation! Most of all it’s time to pack away the woolies, bring out the superhero spring wardrobe and check out this season’s styles! This week, as I dusted off my favourite seasonal superhero cape, I pondered a style dilemma of the non-fashion variety. How many styles are there?

Learning Styles in Training Development: Truth or Myth?

Trivantis

But how significant really is my “learning style” (visual vs. auditory vs. kinesthetic) in the learning and development community? Many studies from the last few years suggest that learning styles are a myth, a fad, a waste of time, etc. I did some more research to read (visual learner here) about both sides of this learning theory in the education and eLearning communities. The post Learning Styles in Training Development: Truth or Myth?

eLearning Trivia

Association eLearning

a)Effective learning. b)Electronic learning. c)Everywhere learning. d)Estimated learning. Learning styles are __. Answer Key: b) Electronic learning. The spelling of “eLearning” has never truly been standardized, but it’s agreed that it describes learning that takes place through electronic devices. Despite widespread continuing belief, learning styles don’t exist/work. This is referred to as multi-modal learning.

Strain the Brain for Better Results

Dashe & Thomson

After all, it’s best if the learner can focus on the learning event rather than on trying to interpret and decipher the meaning… Continue Reading The post Strain the Brain for Better Results appeared first on Social Learning Blog. Learning Style Theory Cognitive Strain CRT elearning instructional design Learning Theory

Brain 156

Learning styles don't exist

Clive on Learning

On the one side are the learning and development romantics, all voodoo and crystals, holding firm to their pseudo-psychological beliefs. On the other, the cold, clinical and calculating rationalists, trying to make sense of the multitude of interacting variables that impact on teaching and learning by resorting to the ultimate killjoy that is science. If learning styles do exist, go on somebody, prove it

Introducing Constructivism in Education Part 1

The E-Learning Curve

Constructivism is an approach to learning based on the premise that cognition, or learning, is the result of mental construction: it's an active process in which learners construct new ideas, skills and behaviours based upon their prior and current knowledge, behaviour and skill assets. Continue Reading → The post Introducing Constructivism in Education Part 1 appeared first on E-Learning Curve Blog.

E-Learning Provocateur: Volume 1

E-Learning Provocateur

The book is entitled E-Learning Provocateur: Volume 1 and my intent is to provoke deeper thinking across a range of themes in the modern workplace, including: • social media. • learning theory. • learning styles. • blended learning. • informal learning. • mobile learning. • the future of e-learning.

Constructivism 3: The Principles of Constructivism

The E-Learning Curve

Bruner’s 1966 text Toward a Theory of Instruction described the key principles of constructivism. Driscoll outlines five conditions for learning. Continue Reading → The post Constructivism 3: The Principles of Constructivism appeared first on E-Learning Curve Blog. Constructivism Learning Theory Bruner conditions of learning learning styles learning theory principles of constructivism

Learning Styles: What Is All the Fuss About?

OpenSesame

I’ve recently been reading quite a few articles, tweets and blog posts about whether learning styles exist. Most I read make their arguments against, but there are still others who are holding onto their belief in the various models and theories. What is a “learning style”?

E-Learning Provocateur: Volume 1

E-Learning Provocateur

The book is entitled E-Learning Provocateur: Volume 1 and my intent is to provoke deeper thinking across a range of themes in the modern workplace, including: • social media. • learning theory. • learning styles. • blended learning. • informal learning. • mobile learning. • the future of e-learning.

Constructivism 10: More Mindtools

The E-Learning Curve

Learning is not restricted to formal learning environments, and that learners can acquire sophisticated skills and advanced knowledge in natural learning situations. Continue Reading → The post Constructivism 10: More Mindtools appeared first on E-Learning Curve Blog. Computer-based technologies can be used as "mindtools" to immerse learners in a Cognitive Web.

Constructivism 9: Mindtools

The E-Learning Curve

Mindtools are computer-based tools and learning environments that have been adapted or developed to function as intellectual partners with the learner in order to engage and facilitate critical thinking and higher order learning. Mindtools are knowledge construction tools that learners learn with, not from. Continue Reading → The post Constructivism 9: Mindtools appeared first on E-Learning Curve Blog.

Constructivism 7: Social Learning cont’d

The E-Learning Curve

Continuing our exploration of social learning. Vygotsky argues that learning precedes development. As developmental processes lag behind learning processes, less experienced or developed individuals can often carry out tasks with the help of others when they can not accomplish these tasks independently. Continue Reading → The post Constructivism 7: Social Learning cont’d appeared first on E-Learning Curve Blog.

Constructivism 11: Organizational Learning

The E-Learning Curve

They assert that it is these mental maps that guide people’s actions rather than the theories they explicitly espouse. This has implications for approaches to organisational learning. Continue Reading → The post Constructivism 11: Organizational Learning appeared first on E-Learning Curve Blog. Argyris & Schön support the argument that individuals have mental maps both for their skill assets and how to act in situations.

Constructivism 8: Challenges of Elearning

The E-Learning Curve

Regarding the challenges of elearning, in 2001 David Jonassen argues that “most e-learning replicates the worst features of face-to-face instruction: it may be cheaper to ‘deliver’ over the Internet, but it won't be more effective. For “substantive change" we must create meaningful learning experiences. Continue Reading → The post Constructivism 8: Challenges of Elearning appeared first on E-Learning Curve Blog.

Everybody’s Got Something To Teach…!!!

Learnnovators

When I joined as an ID at Learnnovators , the first thing that one of my colleagues told me was that an ID must have a great passion for learning. I don’t know if I am learning as how she meant it, but I do end up learning something new every minute. To make this clear, let me talk about a lesson I learned in civics class at school: Every citizen has a voice and opinion in the matters of the country. We end up learning even when we are not consciously learning.

Teach 101

Learning Styles are a Myth [INFOGRAPHIC]

LearnDash

Back in May I wrote a post on learning styles , giving a general overview of some of the more commonly mentioned style of today. Naturally, this seemed to cause some angst among some readers who find learning styles to be essentially non-existent. As such, today’s post includes an infographic that supports the theory that learning styles are essentially a myth.

Paper Cuts

Learnnovators

I’ve been tinkering with it and, in the spirit of Virtual Reality Working Out Loud Week , I’ve decided to share with you what I’ve learned so far. Thankfully I stumbled on this article by Phil Nickinson and learned that instead of starting at the map and uploading your photo sphere, you start at the photo sphere in your phone’s image gallery and share it to Maps. My VR learning journey thus far may be described as joy punctuated by disappointment.

Style counsel

E-Learning Provocateur

And the echo chamber has been giving learning styles a beating. The theory. VAK is perhaps the most popular model of learning styles used in the corporate sector today: V stands for “Visual&#. These people learn best by seeing. These people learn best by listening. K stands for “Kinaesthetic “ These people learn best by touching and feeling. At the very least, a learning style represents a personal preference.

Experiential Learning in the Workplace

The E-Learning Curve

Experiential learning theory (ELT) describes learning as “the process whereby knowledge is created through the transformation of experience” Continue Reading → The post Experiential Learning in the Workplace appeared first on E-Learning Curve Blog.

Constructivism 2: The Cognitive Revolution

The E-Learning Curve

Continue Reading → The post Constructivism 2: The Cognitive Revolution appeared first on E-Learning Curve Blog. Constructivism E-Learning Jerome Bruner Bruner Cognitive Revolution learning styles learning theory Piaget Vygotsky

Towards a Definition of Elearning

The E-Learning Curve

“E-learning” means different things to different people. When you consider that you can call the discipline “e-learning”, “elearning” or even “eLearning”, it’s no surprise that there is a range of definitions of the subject: we prefer to define things according to how we use them. Continue Reading → The post Towards a Definition of Elearning appeared first on E-Learning Curve Blog.

Constructivism 6: Social Learning

The E-Learning Curve

One of the primary conditions of knowledge working is the social learning aspect. Knowledge workers can learn by collaborating with their peers with similar skill sets and in project teams which require knowledge workers from different disciplines to cooperate in the implementation of solutions. Continue Reading → The post Constructivism 6: Social Learning appeared first on E-Learning Curve Blog.

What is Andragogy? Less Than 100 Words

Roundtable Learning

Ready to learn more about Andragogy? Malcolm Knowles’s theory of andragogy is concerned with the teaching and learning styles of adult learners. Self-Concept : Adults thrive in independent learning and training scenarios.