Split-tasking vs. Multitasking – The New Way to Get Things Done

KnowledgeCity

Do you consider yourself a multitasker? Of course you are a multitasker – or are you? Multitasking was once the darling of the workplace, using the latest tools to get more things done at the same time. Yet recent research shows that multitasking is a myth. Just consider the types of tasks you are doing when you apparently “multitask.” How does that work out for you? In other words, you are split-tasking, not multitasking.

Use Employee Health As a Performance Engine

CLO Magazine

That might include instituting walking meetings, encouraging energy breaks and discouraging multitasking. The 2012 Towers Watson “Staying @ Work Survey Report” stated, “This year’s survey results show a strong link between highly effective health and productivity strategies and strong human capital and financial results.”

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Managing Remote Teams: Advice From the Experts (Part 3)

General Assembly

We hope our experts’ advice has been useful for team leaders who are transitioning to working from home and adjusting to this new normal in the world of work. In your role, you’ve participated in many conversations with our partners who are shifting to remote work. If minutes tend not to work for you, then try to estimate time based on the percentage of the meeting you want to spend covering a given topic.

How to Help Managers Avoid Burnout and Stay Productive

Everwise

Managers lead teams and product development, project deadlines and communicate between departments, all while working to “meet the bottom line.” And in an age where technology has made the line between home and work life imperceptible, it’s difficult to disconnect and decompress. People can work really hard, but still be engaged and not feel the pangs of burnout according to Christina Maslach, Professor of Psychology at UC Berkeley. Find meaning at work.