Lurking is Not a Static State

ID Reflections

Lurking and its role in communities has been on the forefront of my mind for the past few days. It has received a lot of attention in the past from the thought leaders in the realm of learning and the role of communities in personal as well as organizational learning. I have recently taken on enterprise community facilitation and was curious to see how people are interacting on our enterprise collaboration platform.

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The new workplace

Jay Cross

Six years ago few people believed that informal learning made much of a difference. However, few of them are doing much systematically. Consider what’s changed: We used to think that communities of practice could only sprout up organically. Companies are connecting people with social network technology. Some have so embraced in-house social networking, microblogging, and discussion forums that they define themselves as “social businesses.”

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When Social means Business …

Learning Cafe

Last week news was abounding that Microsoft are about to announce their acquisition of social media company Yammer for $1.2B. Although not yet confirmed, it comes hot on the heels of other social media buy outs such as Salesforce.com snapping up Buddy Media for close to $700 million to complement its existing Chatter social media platform; Oracle adding Collective Intellect and Vitrue to its portfolio of social media-related acquisitions and SAP acquiring Ariba for $4.3

The Social Learning Revolution in eLearning

TalentLMS

The boom in social media and the round-the-clock need to connect in communities is doing wonders for the eLearning industry. Leveraging social learning with the eLearning content is the new norm of eLearning courses. Social learning creates the much in-demand informal learning setting where learners can network, share, collaborate, and exchange ideas on problem-solving. Let’s examine some top benefits of social learning in organizations.

Should your corporate training strategy move to the MOOC?

Your Training Edge

A company’s training strategy usually comprises of four aspects: Identifying measurable outcomes. Monitoring the effectiveness of the training plan. It is purely based on your business goals and comprises of targets such as increased productivity, reduced attrition, improved customer service, etc. It is advisable to monitor every aspect of your methodology so that when the time comes, the evaluation of whether to go the MOOC way or not will become simple for you.

Study: L&D Spending on the Rise

CLO Magazine

Money spent on training rose 12 percent on average in 2012, according to a new study, a sign that, amid greater financial stability, firms are focused on the development of their workforces. 22 Money spent on training rose 12 percent on average in 2012, according to a study by human resources research firm Bersin by Deloitte, a sign that, amid greater financial stability, firms are focused on the development of their workforces. companies spent an average of $706 per learner.

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Stats on Workplace Learning

Marcia Conner

When I lead education at PeopleSoft a gazillion years ago, I shared with the head of all customer-facing services a copy of Training Magazine ‘s annual numbers issue, published each November (now their November/December issue ). With the popularity of my stats to make the case for social tools in business , post I realized others may also appreciate information on where to find data about learning at work. Of this total direct learning expenditure, 56 percent ($87.5

Social, Informal Learning Can Be ?Measured

CLO Magazine

“Data such as participation rates for discussions, questions asked and answered, and ratings of submitted content become important with social and informal learning,” he said. Wentworth said these pieces of information allow organizations to identify people who are hubs of informal knowledge, along with those who are simply listening or not participating at all. Are outcomes improving because of these learning methods?

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Revamping 70-20-10

CLO Magazine

The 70-20-10 model for professional development is a valuable but dated approach in need of a checkup. There is a core set of frameworks that support the way organizational learning and development is conducted. Many of these, such as the Kirkpatrick evaluation levels, carrot and stick motivational programs and the ADDIE model have been around since the 1960s. The world of mobile and social learning and Google, however, requires new measures.