Informal Learning – the other 80%

Jay Cross

The start-up stiffed me but the paper morphed into the Informal Learning book. I’ll be leading a series of master classes on informal learning and working smarter in Europe. Informal Learning – the other 80%. Employees and partners with more capacity to learn are more versatile in adapting to future conditions. Because organizations are oblivious to informal learning, they fail to invest in it. Learning is social.

Informal Learning 2.0

Jay Cross

Published in Chief Learning Officer, August 2009. Informal Learning 2.0. In the world of business, the era of networks is crowding out the Industrial Age. Networks reduce transfer costs to zero, enabling companies to focus on what they do best while outsourcing what others can do better. In sum, networks are ushering in new ways of doing business. Corporate approaches to learning have to change, as well. It’s learn or die.

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The Changing Face of Work and Workplace Learning

Learnnovators

Now that my disclaimers are in place, let me explain the premise of the post title and what I intend to discuss in this post. I am not doing (at least trying not to) today what I did five years back–not only in terms of professional and personal growth but with respect to the demands of the time. Technology has brought about unprecedented changes at a pace that is challenging all notions of flexibility and adaptability. I am not the kind to crystal gaze.

Integrating Social Learning In The Workplace

Learnnovators

I have been writing about social learning and its related concepts – communities of practices , working out loud and skills for the networked world for quite some time now. Social learning has become a buzzword in the workplace learning space, and every other organization is claiming to have “social learning” as a part of the mix. The catch is that “social learning” cannot just be implemented or enforced.

INTEGRATING SOCIAL LEARNING IN THE WORKPLACE

Learnnovators

I have been writing about social learning and its related concepts – communities of practices , working out loud and skills for the networked world for quite some time now. Social learning has become a buzzword in the workplace learning space, and every other organization is claiming to have “social learning” as a part of the mix. The catch is that “social learning” cannot just be implemented or enforced.

The Changing Face of Work and Workplace Learning

ID Reflections

Now that my disclaimers are in place, let me explain the premise of the post title and what I intend to discuss in this post. I am not doing (at least trying not to) today what I did five years back--not only in terms of professional and personal growth but with respect to the demands of the time. Technology has brought about unprecedented changes at a pace that is challenging all notions of flexibility and adaptability. I am not the kind to crystal gaze.

Change 184

Summarizing Learn for Yourself

Jay Cross

I just copied a rough draft of my new book, Learn For Yourself , into a free summarizer. It’s all a matter of learning, but it’s not the sort of learning that is the province of training departments, workshops, and classrooms. You are learning to learn how to become the person you wrote the obit for. It’s learning to know versus learning to be. Most of what we learn, we learn by interacting with others.

The differences between learning in an e-business and learning in a social business

Jane Hart

In my recent webinar I shared a slide that showed the 5 stages of workplace learning. This has attracted a lot of interest, and I’ve been asked to talk more about the differences between “learning” in Stages 1-4 and Stage 5. Working and learning in Stages 1-4 is based upon a Taylorist , industrial age mindset. Similarly e-learning was also about automating traditional training practices. LEARNING IN AN E-BUSINESS. E-Learning.

Social 165

THE CHANGING FACE OF WORK AND WORKPLACE LEARNING

Learnnovators

Now that my disclaimers are in place, let me explain the premise of the post title and what I intend to discuss in this post. I am not doing (at least trying not to) today what I did five years back–not only in terms of professional and personal growth but with respect to the demands of the time. Technology has brought about unprecedented changes at a pace that is challenging all notions of flexibility and adaptability. I am not the kind to crystal gaze.

Top 10 eLearning Predictions 2011 #LCBQ

Tony Karrer

Lots of discussion and debate around interesting questions for eLearning professionals. We would welcome lots of discussion. Learning apps. Branon Learning Management System App Stores Bob Little Apps, Not Courses Inge de Waard Augmented reality moves towards augmented learning with easy tools: Wikitude , Layar , ARToolKit. Situated learning (learning within context in a community of practice) grows thanks to augmented mobile reality.

What About the Future?

Jay Cross

Most CLOs I talk with are so busy taking care of today’s business that they spend little time preparing for the future. Short-term thinking is good for responding to incremental change, but deciding things one step at a time doesn’t prepare you to thrive in a world of systemic, wholesale change. Royal Dutch Shell, the fifth largest company in the world and a long-term player (Shell’s more than a hundred years old), has been learning from scenarios for forty years.

Through the Workscape Looking Glass

Jay Cross

It’s the biggest frame of the big picture. Learning Ecosystem, Learning Ecology, and Learnscape mean the same thing as Workscape. I don’t use the word learn with executives, who inevitably think back to the awfulness of school and close their ears. The Workscape is a systems-eye view of the workplace. In the same vein, I talk about Working Smarter instead of informal learning, social learning, and so forth. Action learning.

IBM 55

Decisions, decisions. Business decisions.

Jay Cross

Jay Cross examines decision making on learning at work, and gives the lie to some myths about the use of business metrics. To “earn a seat at the table” where the business managers sit, you must: Speak the language of business. Behave like an officer of the corporation. It is equally vital to understand that different officers of your corporation will approach decisions about learning in very different ways depending on their circumstances.

Notes from DevLearn and the Adobe Learning Summit

Steve Howard

Following is a largely unedited version of conference notes that I have just distributed internally where I work. As a blog post it’s probably pretty crap – too long, too much scrolling, but as a record of the event, and a method for me to retain my learning, it is just dandy, thank you. Hopefully you, my brave reader, can get similar value from my scribblings, but I make no apology for the size or the content of this blog post. Main outcomes/information:-.

4 Phrases to Describe DevLearn 2016

Web Courseworks

I’ve been attending eLearning Guild conferences since the community of practice’s inception around 2008. It has been fun watching company name changes and the growth of companies serving this nascent industry. Watching the growing number of hard working practitioner s who utilize vendor software and services has been especially enjoyable. They should have success bringing their unique K-12 gaming creation experience to Adult Learning with VR.