Experiencing eLearning

Should We Create Courses or Just Performance Support?

Experiencing eLearning

In my last post, I shared some thoughts about why people need to actually learn and remember things, rather than assuming we can always look them up.

Do People Need to Learn, or Can They Look It All Up?

Experiencing eLearning

I have been part of several discussions recently that questioned the value of creating courses and delivering formal training.

Feedback in Branching Scenarios: What Works for Novices, Experts, and Everyone

Experiencing eLearning

When we provide feedback in branching scenarios, we have several questions to consider. Should we provide consequences (intrinsic feedback) or coaching (instructional feedback)? Should we provide immediate feedback or delayed feedback? What works for novices versus experts?

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Better Feedback for Scenario-Based eLearning Presentation

Experiencing eLearning

If you weren’t able to attend my session at the Learning Solutions Conference in Orlando , you can still hear me speaking on this topic.

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3 Reasons to Prioritize On-Demand Customer Training

How can you provide a great onboarding experience while keeping up with a growing customer base? By leveraging on-demand training. This guide describes three benefits of adding on-demand training to your onboarding process. Click here to download.

Instructional Design Isn’t Dying. It’s Evolving.

Experiencing eLearning

You may have read dire predictions that instructional design is dead. The eLearning Guild just published a report titled “ Is instructional design a dying art? ” One of the guild’s recent surveys asked participants if ID is a dying field. Is it really?

Media Options for Conversation-Driven eLearning

Experiencing eLearning

Rather than delivering eLearning content as a lecture, you can explain it through conversations. While more resource-intensive multimedia may be desired, you have a range of options with this technique. It’s possible to use conversations even with a low budget.

Avoid This Pitfall in Conversational Writing for eLearning

Experiencing eLearning

We often talk about conversational writing for elearning. A conversational tone flows better in voice over and leads to better learning outcomes. However, I occasionally see examples of elearning where the narrator pretends to be in a literal conversation with the learners.

Immediate and Delayed Consequences in Branching Scenarios

Experiencing eLearning

In branching scenarios, we can use a combination of immediate and delayed consequences and feedback. Consequences are what happens as a result of decisions; feedback is what we tell learners after decisions. Use Immediate Consequences Often.

State of the Front-Line Manager

It's no secret that front-line managers are essential to your organization's success. They form the base of your leadership development funnel and, most likely, account for over half of all your organization's leaders. Improving how front-line managers perform yields mouthwatering increases in how individual contributors perform.

Objections to Stories for Learning

Experiencing eLearning

“Not everyone can be a storyteller.” ” “Stories are a waste of learners’ time.” ” “Stories don’t work for all kinds of training.” ” Have you heard any of these objections?

Scaffolding in Microlearning

Experiencing eLearning

How do you incorporate scaffolding in microlearning? How is scaffolding different in microlearning than in longer formats? First, let’s define scaffolding. Scaffolding is support for learners that gradually fades away until the learner can do the task without support.

Using Time as Scenario Feedback

Experiencing eLearning

Nicole is creating a branching scenario practicing communication techniques for nutrition counselors to better understand their clients’ goals. She has written a simulated conversation between a counselor and a client. Her SME, Brian, provided this feedback after reviewing the prototype.

Scenario-Based Learning: Why & How

Experiencing eLearning

This is the recording of a presentation I gave to the Online Network of Learning and Development Professionals on September 28, 2016. The presentation covers: Why scenario-based learning works. A range of options for using scenarios in elearning and classroom training.

How to Price and Package Customer Training

To charge or not to charge? That is the question many customer training teams are facing today. The answer, however, is not always a straightforward yes or no. Download this guide to learn more.

Benefits of Scenario-Based Learning

Experiencing eLearning

Why are scenarios effective for learning? They provide realistic context and emotional engagement. They can increase motivation and accelerate expertise. Here’s a selection of quotes explaining the benefits.

Consider 4 Cs in Scenario-Based Learning

Experiencing eLearning

When I create scenarios for learning, I keep these four elements in mind: characters, context, challenge, and consequences. Characters. The main character of your scenario who drives the action should generally be someone similar to your learners.

Branching Scenario Prototype in Twine

Experiencing eLearning

I built this branching scenario in the open source tool Twine. This scenario is moderately complex, with a total of 17 pages (or passages in Twine terminology) and 8 different endings. The ideal path has 5 decisions to reach the best conclusion.

How Long Should We Let Learners Go Down the Wrong Path?

Experiencing eLearning

In a comment to my post on Managing the Complexity in Branching Scenarios , Nicole Legault made a interesting point. “Why make a learner go so far down a wrong path? I think it’s best to correct and try to get them back on the right (or best) path.”

The Secret to Getting Learning Results May Not Be What You Think

Do you struggle to achieve measurable results with your learning solutions? If so, you’re not alone. According to CEB, traditional training only creates 37% learning transfer. This guide explores the causes of poor transfer and concrete steps to achieving better outcomes.

What I Learned at LSCon18

Experiencing eLearning

Last month, I attended the Learning Solutions 2018 Conference in Orlando. Once again, it was a great experience. I had fun meeting people like Judy Katz, Tracy Parish, Cammy Bean, and Clark Quinn in person who I have known online for years, plus seeing people again from last year. Now that I’ve had a few weeks to process and reflect, I want to summarize some of what I learned. I did a similar post last year , and it helped me reinforce and remember what I learned.

What to Write First in Branching Scenarios

Experiencing eLearning

Writing a branching scenario can be intimidating or overwhelming. Unlike a linear course, it’s not as easy to know where to start writing. Do you write the endings first? Do you write all the mistakes first? Do you start at the beginning and then flesh out each path as you write those choices?

Scenario-Based Learning in Higher Ed

Experiencing eLearning

A reader asked a great question about the role of scenario-based learning in higher education. I’ve seen a number of good examples of storytelling and scenarios in university courses. Authentic Assessment. My first ID job was with an online university targeting nontraditional students.

How to Get Started Writing a Branching Scenario for Learning

Experiencing eLearning

In a recent conversation, a colleague asked, “Once you and your client have agreed on a branching scenario approach, how do you get started writing it? How do you get from the broad concept of training on X topic to actually creating the scenario?”

Your Guide to Creating a Customer Onboarding Program

Even if you don’t have a formal program in place, customer onboarding is already happening at your organization. The question is, are you dictating it and guaranteeing a great experience? If not, this guide can help help.

Broad and Deep Instructional Design Skills

Experiencing eLearning

Do instructional designers or learning experience designers need to know how to use development tools, or should they focus just on analysis and design? What about people who only do development but no design; are they instructional designers?

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Don’t Restart Scenario-Based Learning, Go Back

Experiencing eLearning

In my previous posts, I shared tips for managing the complexity of branching scenarios and some ideas on how long to let learners go down the wrong path. At some point in that wrong path, you have to redirect learners.

Writing Conversations for eLearning

Experiencing eLearning

In the previous post, How to Start Creating Conversation-Driven eLearning , I described how I use conversations between two characters to deliver eLearning content. In this post, I’ll explain how to write and structure the conversation.

How to Start Creating Conversation-Driven eLearning

Experiencing eLearning

Several studies have found learners can remember information in a narrative format better than bullet points (for example, Glonek & King, as cited in Kapp, 2014).

Living up to the Promise of eLearning: Closing the Learning-Doing Gap

It’s well documented that people leave managers – not companies. Download this guide to learn how to shift the perspective from event to journey and how to take learners through Proficiency Journeys to get results.

Writing Mistakes and Consequences

Experiencing eLearning

In my previous post, I explained how I write the ideal path for a branching scenario first. Once that is complete, I write the mistakes or errors and consequences for those choices. First, Draft One Alternate Path to Its Conclusion. I start writing a single alternate path from beginning to end.

Don’t Restart Scenario-Based Learning, Go Back

Experiencing eLearning

In my previous posts, I shared tips for managing the complexity of branching scenarios and some ideas on how long to let learners go down the wrong path. At some point in that wrong path, you have to redirect learners.

1 Million Views. Thank You!

Experiencing eLearning

Today, I reached a milestone in my blog: 1 million total views. Thank you to everyone who is reading this, from the long term readers who have been there since the beginning to the ones who just found me today.

Vary Sentence Structure in Voice Over Scripts

Experiencing eLearning

When you use voice over for elearning, do you want it to sound natural and flowing, or do you want it to sound stiff and didactic? A great voice over person can make a good script more engaging, and a great script sound fantastic.

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How to Price and Package Customer Training

To charge or not to charge? That is the question many customer training teams are facing today. The answer, however, is not always a straightforward yes or no. Download this guide to learn more.

Learning Experience Design: A Better Title Than Instructional Design?

Experiencing eLearning

How many times have you told people, “I’m an instructional designer,” only to be met with a blank stare? How many people are thoroughly confused about what we do for a living?

When Is Audio Narration Helpful?

Experiencing eLearning

In a discussion on eLearning Heroes , Judith Reymond asked about the research on when or whether audio narration is helpful to adult learners. In Clark and Mayer’s eLearning and the Science of Instruction , they say that the research generally supports using narration with on-screen visuals.

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Name Generators for Learning Scenarios

Experiencing eLearning

Because I create lots of scenarios and stories for learning, I create lots of characters. Some of these characters are only mentioned for a sentence or two, while others drive the progress in extended narratives. All of those characters have one thing in common: they need names.

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Voice Over Script Review Checklist

Experiencing eLearning

I’ve written several posts with tips on how to write voice over scripts. This review checklist summarizes all of the tips from the previous three posts into a single Word document you can download and use yourself. Voice Over Script Review Checklist.

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Move Beyond Learning to Applying: A Modern Management Development Program

It’s well documented that people leave managers – not companies. Download this guide to learn how to shift the perspective from event to journey and how to take learners through Proficiency Journeys to get results.