The importance of being networked

Learning with 'e's

In yesterday's blogpost Separation and connection I talked about the nature of social media and their capability to amplify human contact. Specifically, I made the point that Personal Learning Networks (PLNs) are enabled and strengthened when we make connections through social media tools. One of the key reasons educators need a PLN is to keep in touch, to maintain dialogue with their community of practice. our use of social media actually engages.'

I Believe in the Importance of a Personal Learning Network

Tom Spiglanin

When I started using Twitter for my professional growth and development, I didn’t realize that I was also starting to build my personal learning network. I hadn’t yet recognized the value of connectedness , but knew immediately that I was learning from each of these encounters. I had more than a dozen individuals I interacted with regularly, and we would discuss thoughts, ideas, and plans related to one or more aspects of learning and development.

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Networked pedagogy

Learning with 'e's

New theories for the networked, digital age, emerging cultures of learning and a hyper-connected and networked society. Differentials between academic practices, and the variety of roles we adopt within communities of practice and learning. The impact of traditional education on contemporary pedagogical practices. Chaos and uncertainty versus knowing and order, and the educational impact of rhizomatic approaches to learning.

Ambient learning

Learning with 'e's

Photograph from Pexels One of the most valuable properties in any organisation is intellectual capital - the intangible value of a business generated by its people. Learning occurs in the authentic context of the activity, rather than as a detached concept or set of procedures which one has to apply later if and when the problem arises. Ambient learning also relates to people adapting their technologies and environments to suit their working practices.

PLN or CoP?

Learning with 'e's

That''s quite an apt result because Google and many of the other large, supposedly ''free'' social media tools are very much focused on making money to sustain their operations. Nor is it about the morality of social media companies. In the context of this post, PLN stands for Personal Learning Network , and CoP stands for Communities of Practice. A quick search reveals that not a lot has been written about the juxtaposition of the two.

Blogging as conversation

Learning with 'e's

"A single conversation across the table with a wise man is better than ten years mere study of books." - Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. My professional life is pretty hectic much of the time, and I needed a space to write down my ideas and record my thoughts before I forgot them. I could have simply used a paper based diary, but I decided when I first heard of blogging that it might fulfil the role of an e-diary for me.

#LearningIs connected

Learning with 'e's

Students are connected to digital content through a variety of tools and technologies, increasingly through devices that are personally owned. Students are connected to each other through social media and networks. And students are connected to tools that enabled them to discover new content, to collate and curate it, to repurpose/remix it and to share it within their communities of practice. Learning in the digital age means being connected.

#LearningIs social

Learning with 'e's

Most of our learning is achieved within social contexts. I can't recall many examples where I have learnt something significant without the presence of others. From language acquisition, to basic numeracy and literacy skills, to more sophisticated activities such as public speaking, dining out with old friends or driving in traffic - all have been scaffolded and coached through the influence of others. Humans are inherently social. We want to be accepted by others.

Digital learning in organisations

Learning with 'e's

I have been busy writing a new book, and the last month has involved a lot of research and writing, completing, editing and polishing of my manuscript for final submission later this month. It was about time I tackled another sector of learning and I have become very familiar with leaning and development in organisations over the last decade. The title of the book is 'Digital Learning in Organisations', and is already being marketed on Amazon and other online outlets.

Is all learning social?

Learning with 'e's

Just about every day I find myself embroiled in a discussions about fundamentals of learning, the nature of knowledge and the processes of education. It comes with the territory of working as an academic in a university, and I expect to do it much of the time. In the post I made the remark that today's learning needs to be personal, social and global, all of which can be mediated through technology. This is known as the zone of proximal development (ZPD).

Content is a tyrant.

Learning with 'e's

The imminent arrival of widespread 4G broadband and LTE ( Long Term Evolution ) will usher in wider availability to information and push even more data to our mobile devices over the same amount of radio spectrum. But in adopting these communication advances, are we also opening the door for a deluge of content? Are we not already swamped by a tsunami of content? Knowledge comes about through learning and through the diligent application of information.

Cammy Beans Learning Visions: Defining an e-Learning Strategy: Planning the Kickoff

Learning Visions

Thursday, June 14, 2007 Defining an e-Learning Strategy: Planning the Kickoff In the spirit of building a Community of Practice -- sharing ideas and processes -- I thought Id try and share what I can of a current project. Ive done a lot of e-Learning projects, created a lot of courses, but this is the first time that Ive been a part of the strategy itself. I did a lot of research in preparing our proposal and making our sales call.

I Believe in the Value of Sharing

Tom Spiglanin

As a workplace professional, I believe strongly in the value of sharing. I’m not talking about the monetary value of a social share (which business people are keen on doing ), but rather the less tangible value that comes from sharing knowledge, making an individual more productive, effective, and efficient. In other words, the value that is manifest in the form of improved personal performance in the workplace. The Value of Sharing Outside the Organization.

A little more conversation

Learning with 'e's

Now it depends on how you define CPD, but for me it is the personal learning you require to sustain, enhance and extend your own capabilities within your professional practice. My Personal Learning Network (PLN) is the vehicle that carries me to this learning, and social media is the highway that enables me to get there. All of my learning right now, at this stage of my career, is self determined.

Connected educators

Learning with 'e's

Are you a teacher who has managed to harness the power of social media to connect with peers and experts around the globe? Coming hand in hand with these connections is a whole new culture of learning and teaching. Connected educators know that in doing this they become global educators, with their content being amplified across a worldwide community of practice. On the #authorspeak Twitter hashtag today there was a lot of commentary about connected educators.

Parrot fashion

Learning with 'e's

There is a story of a woman who wanted a talking bird so she went to the pet shop bought a parrot. But if you starve yourself of a social life, your relationships will die, and your life experience will be the poorer for it. Yet many teachers and students see social networking tools as frivolous entertainment or ego massage. How many students have a narrower view of learning because they have no professional learning network to call upon?

Two innovations that have changed learning forever

Learning with 'e's

On the face of it, this could be quite a difficult question to answer, simply because I have been involved in the study of educational technology since 1976, almost 40 years. During that time I have seen a great number of innovations. The extent of change that has occurred in this period was quite astounding. I witnessed the development of video cassette tapes, CD-ROMs, personal computers in the 70s and 80s but this was just the start.

Slugs and snails and social enzymes

Learning with e's

I can count on the fingers of one hand the times I have learnt something significant without the help or influence of others (and counting on my fingers wasn't learnt without help, believe me). Conversation is of course often technologically mediated in this digital age. We can use text, audio or video in a number of modes and through a mind dazzling range of technologies. And there is a record - an archive - of our conversation if we want one.

Cammy Beans Learning Visions: Brent Schlenker: Marketers and Game Developers Know More About Learning Than We Do!

Learning Visions

hosted by Training Magazine Network. ** Disclaimers: “I am not a marketer or a game developer.&# (Although he plays a LOT of games). Point of today’s conversation: talking training, design and development if a marketing person were doing it. We bow to the will of the SME… Little room for creativity New technology gives us new tools. That’s where most creative talent in organizations go. Common Craft Videos Great at explaining.

Market 100

Instagram, WhatsApp and Learning

Learning with 'e's

In a recently published article, my colleagues Maged Boulos, Dean Giustini and I write about how learning through social media is transforming medical practices, health care and education. Learning is essentially a social activity, where people scaffold and extend each other’s knowledge gain [ 54 ], but in recent years, new theories have emerged to explain distributed forms of learning that have been made possible through mobile technology and social media.

Making connections

Learning with 'e's

One major phenomenon of the last decade has undoubtedly been the global and exponential rise of social media. Seeded at the turn of the century, the social web phase of Internet development promoted connections, participation, networked sociality. It didn''t take long for the emerging social networking services to gain massive worldwide subscriptions. To be able to connect to others and to share ideas and content instantly, caught the imagination of many.

Learning as dialogue

Learning with 'e's

Many of the earlier learning theories place the learner in splendid isolation. From the neo-behaviourist theories of Thorndike, Watson and Skinner, we were led to believe that learners respond to stimuli and make associations between the two, and that these links represent learning. This prompted new approaches in schools that included discovery learning and progressive curricula that neatly reflected Piaget''s stages of cognitive development model.

Taking up residence

Learning with 'e's

David White , who is at Oxford University, is probably best known for his theory of Digital Residents and Visitors. Along with Alison Le Cornu, White published an article in 2011 that countered the Digital Natives and Immigrants ideas of Marc Prensky. Unfortunately, the genie was now out of the bottle, and people believe what they want to believe. White''s argument of Residents and Visitors is therefore a very welcome and timely alternative perspective.

On Aer

Learning with 'e's

I spent two great days in Ireland this weekend, and would like to thank my hosts at the Computer Education Society of Ireland for inviting me. Ahead of my keynote speech at the CESI 2012 conference in Portlaiose, this weekend, I did an interview for Dublin City FM 103.2. The programme Inside Education , presented by Seán Delaney, is a regular radio and podcast Irish perspective on news and stories from the world of education.

My awesome PLN

Learning with 'e's

and of course, I meant it. My PLN is my community of interest and the mirror of my practice. I cannot begin to describe the amount of new things I have discovered, and continue to discover every day, on Twitter and on other online social environments. It's a treasure house of ideas. It's like having a cafe within reach at all hours of the day. The power of this PLN (personal learning network) should not be underestimated.

Dear elearning101.

Learning with e's

Let me introduce you all to 'elearning101' (whoever he or she may be), and point you in the direction of their recent post on my Slideshare site. This is what elearning101 wrote: "Another rehash of the same old stuff. Any chance of of evidence rather than a load of hyperbole. This is just a list of ideas loosely thrown together without any examples, evaluation or evidence Can anyone explain what a CC Steve Wheeler licence is?

Learning first, technology second

Learning with 'e's

Many teachers welcome the idea of bringing new technology into the classroom. They see it as a means to engage learners, and as a way of making connections between school curricula and familiar territory. Ideas range from games based learning , to the use of social media and networking, to simpler approaches such as the use of digital cameras in art or data logging in science. Sometimes, the technology does get in the way of learning and teaching.

Reach out and connect

Learning with e's

One of the digital literacies I identified in yesterday's blogpost was effective social networking. Most of us have a Facebook account, and maybe a LinkedIn account too. Lots of us use Twitter, and some of those out on the periphery may still be using Myspace or Bebo. What else do we need to learn about social networking that can help us or our students to learn better? Wendy Earle's 2005 discussion on the nature of literacies is a useful starting point.

Our digital future 4: Pervasive computing

Learning with 'e's

Participants can join in and leave at any time, as the rolling programme of keynotes, discussions, panels and seminars/workshops plays out in real time on screen. It was a distinct honour to be invited to keynote, and I spoke on one of my favourite (and probably most dangerous) of topics - the future of education. In the 1990s we witnessed the rise of the Internet and the rapid proliferation of web based content.

Next generation learning

Learning with 'e's

In my previous blog post, the architecture of learning , I outlined some of the key characteristics of learning in a digital age, and started to identify some of the main differences between Learning 1.0 In the summary of the article, I suggested that the distinct differences between the two types of learning are mostly based on how learners are changing the ways they interact, and their increased ability to create, share and organise their own learning.

Bear pit pedagogy

Learning with 'e's

Too much bad theory has crept into the classroom in recent years, as I have previously commented , and we want to ensure that our trainee teachers are aware of flaws, counter-arguments and alternatives to all theories. We encourage them to develop their own Personal/Professional Learning Networks (PLNs) so they can lock into and exploit the vast communities of practice that already exist out there in the rapidly expanding Blogosphere and Twitterverse.

Open all OERs

Learning with e's

Time to reflect on the Commonwealth of Learning (CoL) workshop on Open Educational Resources, which was held in Windhoek, Namibia this week. Many were representing the Quality Assurance Agencies of their home countries. Dr Stella Anthony (Australian Universities Network for Quality Assurance) gave the opening presentation for the event, and spoke about the opportunities and challenges of OERs in higher education. IPR and Creative Commons were discussed.

OER 57

Theories for the digital age: Self regulated learning

Learning with 'e's

Informal and self regulated learning are defining characteristics of 21 st Century education. Various commentators suggest that as much as seventy percent of learning occurs outside of formal educational settings (Cofer, 2000; Dobbs, 2000; Cross, 2006). One challenge for education providers is to decide whether they will support the desire of students to self regulate their learning activities using personal technologies. Practice Application Brief No.

Words in mind

Learning with 'e's

Psychologists and cognitive scientists have offered a number of useful theories that aid our understanding of learning. In this series I have been providing a brief overview of each theory, and how each can be applied in education. The last post in this series featured the stages of cognitive development model proposed by Jean Piaget. To retrieve an item from long term memory, the brain traverses a large network of information.

Mapping mobile learning

Learning with 'e's

I have previously written on this blog about how mobile technology can give the edge and also about some of the social implications of learning on the move. All we needed was to reach a point in society where a critical mass of users was reached. That occurred in my estimation somewhere around 2010, and growth of ownership has been exponential since. That critical mass of users has driven a number of changes, including innovations in design of hardware and software.

Five tools for global educators

Learning with 'e's

Recently I have been considering the changing role of teachers who are adopting technology to extend the walls of the classroom. These are a new breed of teachers who do not necessarily accept that the classroom is contained within four walls. In effect, through the use of social media and telecommunication technologies, these teachers are becoming global educators. Blog: Blogging is arguably one of the most powerful tools for global education.

Windmills on the mind

Learning with e's

The dust has settled over the Bazaar 'Show that You Share' conference held this week at the University of Utrecht, Netherlands, and it's all been a bit of a whirl, so now I have some time to reflect, here are some of my thoughts on the proceedings: On the theme of social software, managing digital identities is a concern, with personal content on the web being both an asset and a liability.