Democratization of Organizational Learning

The Performance Improvement Blog

Organizational learning has, for too long, been owned by consultants and chief training and learning officers. Any effort to learn how to improve leadership, management, team building, communication, planning, or other organizational skills, has started with these external and internal gatekeepers. This has made learning generally inaccessible to the people with the greatest need. . Facilitate coaching. Maximize organizational learning.

10 Principles of Organizational Learning DNA

The Performance Improvement Blog

How do we know if an organization has the “DNA” that predisposes it to organizational learning? Gary Neilson and Jaime Estupinan have been studying and writing about "organizational DNA" for the past 10 years. They explain the term this way: We use the term organizational DNA as a metaphor for the underlying organizational and cultural design factors that define an organization’s personality and determine whether it is strong or weak in executing strategy.

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Force Field Analysis of Organizational Learning

The Performance Improvement Blog

learning) and the factors that block people from achieving that change. The table below lists forces that commonly drive learning in organizations and the factors that block learning in organizations. Lack of Leadership Support. Work vs. Learning. What are the factors that drive and block learning in your organization? Leadership Learning Culture Organization Culture Organizational Learning Teamwork Training

LearnTrends: Reinventing Organizational Learning

Experiencing eLearning

These are my live blogged notes from Jay Cross & Clark Quinn’s LearnTrends session on Reinventing Organizational Learning. Article they wrote for CLO mag: “Become a Chief Meta-Learning Officer&#. If you don’t know the solution & need to network/collaborate to find it, that’s learning. Internet Learning Alliance: They were all working independently, decided to work together and practice what they preach. improve learning process.

Why Evaluate Executive Coaching

The Performance Improvement Blog

Executive coaching has quickly become a nearly two billion dollar industry. Many companies now rely on coaching for the development of their leaders. Having a coach, once perceived as an admission of failure, is now perceived as a normal part of managing large, complex organizations. And coaching has also become common for entrepreneurs who need help transitioning from leader of a start-up to manager of a rapidly growing company. How did she work with the coach?

Stop Training Leaders and Start Developing Leadership

The Performance Improvement Blog

[This post first appeared on the Learning to be Great Blog.]. Jessica Leitch, David Lancefield, and Mark Dawson, all of PwC UK, have identified “10 Principles of Strategic Leadership” that, when implemented, create the conditions for the development of strategic leaders. According to the authors, to create this learning culture, share responsibility so that employees can experience risk-taking. Accept failure, as long as it results in learning and performance improvement.

Keep Growing Your Organizational Learning Pyramid

CLO Magazine

An Inclusive Learning Growth Pyramid. Some organizations provide myriad opportunities for learning at different levels of the organizational pyramid. An inclusive learning pyramid would help employees at every level to learn the relevant skills and grow to the next level. Careers are no longer narrowly defined by jobs and skills but through experiences and learning agility.”. Onboarding forms the base of the inclusive learning growth pyramid.

Four False Assumptions About Leadership Development

The Performance Improvement Blog

Deloitte has identified “leadership development” as a major challenge for HR leaders in 2015. From this study, they conclude: Organizations around the world are struggling to strengthen their leadership pipelines, yet over the past year businesses fell further behind, particularly in their ability to develop Millennial leaders. Just because you are in a leadership role doesn’t mean you are an effective leader. and then applying that new found learning.

Coaching to Learn; Learning to Coach

The Performance Improvement Blog

Do you want employees to learn? Do you want them to transfer that learning to the workplace and apply that learning to achieve business goals? Then develop manager-employee relationships that are supportive of learning. From all we know about learning in the workplace it is clear that managers and employees must be allied around learning. According to Roesler, A productive manager-employee coaching relationship includes these elements: Self-Direction.

16 Signs of a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

How do you know your organization has a learning culture ? How will people be learning? While a learning culture is an environment that’s always being developed, certain signs indicate that you are making progress. In a learning culture…. Leaders are communicating the importance of learning (acquiring new knowledge, skills, and capabilities) and holding managers accountable for learning and applying that learning to making a difference for the organization.

The Unexamined Leadership Program is Not Worth Doing

The Performance Improvement Blog

If you’re not going to evaluate a leadership development program, don’t do the program! I’m talking about a systematic, evidence-based look at why it was done, what was done, how it was done, what happened as a result, how it can be improved, and what the organization learned from the process. Validation that the correct learning solution has been identified and suggestions for programme improvement. I would add: Reinforcement of learning.

Do You Have a Learning Culture? (Part One)

The Performance Improvement Blog

Culture used to be considered a byproduct of organizational life. So, how do you know what kind of culture you have and, if you want to create a learning culture, how do you know when you have one? Taking a cue from Shah, here are some espoused values (not necessarily values in use) and instinctive reactions that indicate either the presence or absence of a learning culture. Both reactions are reasonable, but one is indicative of a learning culture and the other is not.

Training Culture vs. Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

What’s the difference between a “training culture” and a “ learning culture ”? As the chart shows, in a training culture, responsibility for employee learning resides with instructors and training managers. In that kind of culture the assumption is that trainers (under the direction of a CLO) drive learning. Whereas in a learning culture, responsibility for learning resides with each employee and each team.

A Year of “The Performance Improvement Blog” in Review

The Performance Improvement Blog

Throughout last year I used this blog to illuminate important leadership and management issues. The topics ranged from creating a learning culture to increasing employee engagement to improving organizational communication to evaluating executive coaching, and more. Here are the links with a short excerpt from each post: How to Create a Learning Culture in Organizations - Organizational learning is not about training.

PwC Canada Strives for a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

If you’re looking for examples of companies that are striving to create and sustain a learning culture, PwC ( PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP) of Canada should be on your list. I recently had the pleasure of speaking about the importance of a learning culture to the Edmonton meeting of The Conference Board of Canada’s Council for Learning and Leadership Development. Incorporating structured learning routines into our working practices (e.g.

Reasons Why You Need to Create a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

I have argued in previous blog posts that organizations need a learning culture because training is not sufficient to develop the necessary competencies of 21rst century workers. For one thing, the learning from training events is often not transferred to the workplace. Also, formal training cannot be responsive to the kind of learning agility that is needed in the high tech, competitive world that we live in today.

Beyond Training: Three Models

The Performance Improvement Blog

Organizational learning is so much more than training. Three models of learning convey the breadth of options that, depending on what an employee needs to learn, are more effective, cheaper, and easier to implement than formal training programs. One of these models I call “50 Ways to Lever Learning.” This list fits into the push vs. pull model of learning in organizations. Another model is what Bersin by Deloitte calls the “Learning Technology Stack.”

Imagine a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

Imagine a company that, in the face of unprecedented change, is continually learning how to learn fast: managing tremendous amounts of information; creating new products and processes in response to global competition; using new apps to be more efficient and effective; and being responsive to learning preferences of a multi-generational and diverse workforce. Imagine a company in which employees are hired because they are excited about learning and improving themselves.

Creating a Culture for Learning

The Performance Improvement Blog

A company managing minds maintains a culture in which learning how to learn is valued and accepted, and the pursuit of learning is woven into the fabric of organi­zational life. How do you know if your organization has the DNA that predisposes it to learning? Gary Neilson and Jaime Estupiñán have been studying and writing about organizational DNA for the past 10 years. Learning is aligned with results. Organizational structure facilitates learning.

Eight Leader Habits of a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

Eight leader habits are essential to a learning culture. These are behaviors ingrained in the routines and rituals of organizations that are continually learning and learning how to learn. Leaders in these organizations do the following: Send the message - Leaders communicate the importance of learning to the organization. Build trust - Employees will invest time and effort in learning if they trust their managers. This learning cannot be left to chance.

Do You Have a Learning Culture? (Part Two)

The Performance Improvement Blog

In "Part One" of this post, I presented some situations in which espoused values (not necessarily values in use) play a role and examples of instinctive reactions that indicate either the presence or absence of a learning culture. . What did you learn from trying to build the app? What did you learn about developing new products, about collaboration, and about yourself? Both reactions are reasonable, but one is indicative of a learning culture and the other is not.

Key Elements of a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

A “learning culture” is a community of workers continuously and collectively seeking performance improvement through new knowledge, new skills, and new applications of knowledge and skills to achieve the goals of the organization. A learning culture is a culture of inquiry; an environment in which employees feel safe asking tough questions about the purpose and quality of what they are doing for customers, themselves, and other stakeholders.

The Performance Management Myth

The Performance Improvement Blog

In an article for T+D titled, A Closer Look: Myths vs. Reality in Training , Pat Galagan presents a number of provocative challenges to popular assumptions about training and learning. I’ve written previously about the importance of creating a learning culture in organizations. Performance management systems that are based on the talent-is-fixed belief are a barrier to creating a learning culture.

Creating a Culture for Learning

The Performance Improvement Blog

A company managing minds maintains a culture in which learning how to learn is valued and accepted, and the pursuit of learning is woven into the fabric of organi­zational life. How do you know if your organization has the DNA that predisposes it to learning? Gary Neilson and Jaime Estupiñán have been studying and writing about organizational DNA for the past 10 years. Learning is aligned with results. Organizational structure facilitates learning.

Leaders Learning about Learning

The Performance Improvement Blog

Recently, I conducted a workshop for the leadership team of a company that wants to increase the impact of its training programs. I explained the limitations of formal training and the need for taking an organizational learning perspective. I argued that in order for any kind of learning intervention (training, coaching, mentoring, action learning, etc.) They wanted to know specifically what they could do to facilitate learning.

This Is What I Believe About Learning in Organizations

The Performance Improvement Blog

The Purpose of Business is Learning. But none of this is possible without learning. At its core, any high performing organization is about learning; continually using new information to become smarter, better, and more effective. To survive and thrive today, industries need innovation which is essentially about learning. Companies must learn more deeply about their customers and markets. Training Is Not Learning. Work is No Longer Work .

Learning in a Managing Minds Company

The Performance Improvement Blog

The future of how we learn in our organizations is a popular topic. But unless you are responsible for developing, delivering, managing, and measuring training and learning, keeping up with the latest learning technologies can be overwhelming. The training and learning technology discussions miss the point. Our approach is to suggest new ways of facilitating learning that fit into managing minds. Learning independently. Learning interactively.

Learning in a Managing Minds Company

The Performance Improvement Blog

The future of how we learn in our organizations is a popular topic. But unless you are responsible for developing, delivering, managing, and measuring training and learning, keeping up with the latest learning technologies can be overwhelming. The training and learning technology discussions miss the point. Our approach is to suggest new ways of facilitating learning that fit into managing minds. Learning independently. Learning interactively.

A Manager's View of Employee Learning

The Performance Improvement Blog

Having retired from the auto industry, he is now an executive coach focused on improving Emotional Intelligence (EQ) in leaders. I love the sense of understanding, enthusiasm and acceptance the leadership team conveys here regarding their role in learning. As you might expect, based on my input to a previous blog (3/25, Training Isn’t Learning ), I was delighted to see the emphasis on the necessary role of the manager!

Leader Learning Library

The Performance Improvement Blog

We are witnessing the democratization of leadership, making the "servant leader" even more possible. Everyone can become a leader (as well as an effective follower) by learning about leadership when and where it is most convenient and applicable. Masters in Leadership has put together 100 Exemplary Sites for Future Leaders. These include: Leadership Coaching. Business Leadership. Women in Leadership. General Leadership.

50 Ways to Lever Learning

The Performance Improvement Blog

In a learning culture , formal training is just one of many methods used to facilitate employee learning. In a learning culture, we start with the performance goal and then select the mix of methods that will help employees acquire and retain the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and beliefs they need in order to achieve those goals. Instructor-centered class (fact to face) – traditional classroom in which instructor controls the content and learning process.

Harry Levinson 1922-2012

The Performance Improvement Blog

We lost one of the giants in the study of organizational learning and performance this week. Harry Levinson died at the age of 90 after a long and productive career making organizational leaders aware of the importance of psychological dynamics to their employees and themselves. Levinson was one of the first to speak about the impact of organizational culture on worker performance. Levinson had some strong words for organizational consultants.

Investing in Training in Downturns and Upturns

The Performance Improvement Blog

Pay attention to the quality of content and quality of the learning intervention. Keep employee satisfaction high – Involving employees in opportunities to learn is an effective way to increase engagement. Many employees value learning more than a pay increase. To keep engagement high, make continuous learning part of the culture of the organization. This is something that all managers need to keep learning. It’s about learning; it’s not about glitzy programs.

Top 10 Questions to Evaluate a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

In a discussion started by Camilla Keen on LinkedIn, she asks, “In order to find out and evaluate if a company has an effective learning culture, what would be your top ten questions?” I commented: Are leaders communicating the importance of learning (acquiring new knowledge, skills, and capabilities) and holding managers accountable for learning and applying that learning to making a difference for the organization?

Becoming a Learning Culture: Competing in an Age of Disruption

The Performance Improvement Blog

Any company, faced with these kinds of disruptive forces must keep learning. Employees must learn how to use new computers and new apps, how to operate new, high tech machinery, how to be responsive to customer demands, how to create innovative products and services, how to manage a multi-cultural, multi-generational workforce, how to work effectively in cross-functional teams, and how to plan for a future that is constantly in flux. Learning is just-in-time, on-demand.

Just-In-Time Learning

The Performance Improvement Blog

Clark Quinn writes about mobile learning and also formal social learning and informal social learning as formats that open up tremendous possibilities for providing information where it is needed. Inspire is “…a web-based tool that empowers employees to take ownership of their leadership development by enabling them to build, drive and track their own leadership development plan.” This is where a boss, supervisor, or coach comes in.

Creating a Learning Culture in Highly Regulated Industries

The Performance Improvement Blog

During the first session of a workshop I facilitate for ATD, one of the participants asked, “What does a learning culture look like in an electrical power generation plant, where most of the training is for the purpose of meeting industry regulations?” This is an excellent question that got me thinking about learning in a highly regulated work environment. First of all, one-time, or even annual programs, is not how the vast majority of people learn.