LearnTrends: Reinventing Organizational Learning

Experiencing eLearning

These are my live blogged notes from Jay Cross & Clark Quinn’s LearnTrends session on Reinventing Organizational Learning. Article they wrote for CLO mag: “Become a Chief Meta-Learning Officer&#. If you don’t know the solution & need to network/collaborate to find it, that’s learning. Internet Learning Alliance: They were all working independently, decided to work together and practice what they preach. improve learning process.

Technology-aided learning: Changing the game in Organizational Learning

G-Cube

On October 9 th -10 th , G-Cube attended India’s largest and most prestigious Chief Learning Officers’ Summit , which brought together learning leaders from different industries from all over India and the world. The theme of event was – Organizational Learning: Impacting business, Changing the game. And we believe that the greatest trend that is changing the game, transforming the way people learn in the 21 st century is Technology-aided Learning.

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Best practices on measuring the impact of organizational learning

Matrix

Learning measurement is one of those topics that constantly seems to need revisiting. Much of the corporate learning has moved online – even something as personal as one on one coaching is often done via some communication app between individuals situated in different geographical areas. Read more: How many types of mentoring are there? Learning evaluation needs to be simpler. Ultimately, this will lead to a learning culture that is data driven.

Mentoring Program Success Story: Extensis Group’s Career Mentoring Program

Chronus

Mentoring programs provide numerous benefits to both employees and employers. Perhaps the most obvious is the impact they have on learning and development within the organization. We sat down with Denise Furlani, Organizational Learning and Development Manager at Extensis, to discuss the origination of the program and the impact they’ve seen so far. Q: Why did Extensis start a mentoring program? Q: What benefits did mentors see?

Keep Growing Your Organizational Learning Pyramid

CLO Magazine

An Inclusive Learning Growth Pyramid. Some organizations provide myriad opportunities for learning at different levels of the organizational pyramid. An inclusive learning pyramid would help employees at every level to learn the relevant skills and grow to the next level. Careers are no longer narrowly defined by jobs and skills but through experiences and learning agility.”. Onboarding forms the base of the inclusive learning growth pyramid.

Why Continued Organizational Learning is Critical to your Performance and Culture

WalkMe Training Station

The first article was “ How ‘Learning Organizations’ Beat Natural Selection” . Organizational learning allows for teams to learn exactly what is relevant to their specific tasks and specialties while other information they do not need is given to the individuals and teams that need it, with some Venn overlap between for cooperation. In other words, how can organizations create a business culture that encourages learning and development?

Key Elements of a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

A “learning culture” is a community of workers continuously and collectively seeking performance improvement through new knowledge, new skills, and new applications of knowledge and skills to achieve the goals of the organization. A learning culture is a culture of inquiry; an environment in which employees feel safe asking tough questions about the purpose and quality of what they are doing for customers, themselves, and other stakeholders.

Harry Levinson 1922-2012

The Performance Improvement Blog

We lost one of the giants in the study of organizational learning and performance this week. Harry Levinson died at the age of 90 after a long and productive career making organizational leaders aware of the importance of psychological dynamics to their employees and themselves. Levinson was one of the first to speak about the impact of organizational culture on worker performance. Levinson had some strong words for organizational consultants.

This Is What I Believe About Learning in Organizations

The Performance Improvement Blog

The Purpose of Business is Learning. But none of this is possible without learning. At its core, any high performing organization is about learning; continually using new information to become smarter, better, and more effective. To survive and thrive today, industries need innovation which is essentially about learning. Companies must learn more deeply about their customers and markets. Training Is Not Learning. Work is No Longer Work .

8 Ways to Achieve eLearning Course Mentoring Excellence

TalentLMS

But an eLearning course experience is never complete without an open-minded mentor who strives to change according to their learners’ needs. That’s why in this article we’ll demonstrate eight ways for you to achieve online course mentoring excellence. . Planning the course mentoring activities is crucial before the start of the eLearning training session. Do you have a co-mentor? The goal is to mentor the current course better than the previous one.

Manager's Role in Learning and Performance Improvement

The Performance Improvement Blog

What should be a manager’s role in employee learning? In answering this question, the first thing managers have to understand is that continuous learning is the modus operandi for all high performance organizations. Individual, team, and enterprise performance can’t improve without learning. Learning isn’t in addition to a manager’s job; it IS a manager’s job. An engineer in a prototype department of a manufacturer learns how to operate a 3D printer.

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Training Culture vs. Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

What’s the difference between a “training culture” and a “ learning culture ”? As the chart shows, in a training culture, responsibility for employee learning resides with instructors and training managers. In that kind of culture the assumption is that trainers (under the direction of a CLO) drive learning. Whereas in a learning culture, responsibility for learning resides with each employee and each team.

Reasons Why You Need to Create a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

I have argued in previous blog posts that organizations need a learning culture because training is not sufficient to develop the necessary competencies of 21rst century workers. For one thing, the learning from training events is often not transferred to the workplace. Also, formal training cannot be responsive to the kind of learning agility that is needed in the high tech, competitive world that we live in today.

70:20:10 For Trainers

Learnnovators

Learning & Development Professional has been running a poll on the following question: Is the 70:20:10 model still relevant today? It just refers to the general observation that the majority of learning in the workplace is done on the job, a substantial chunk is done by interacting with others, while a much smaller proportion is done off the job (eg in a classroom). Not only does this extend the learning experience, but it also bakes in accountability for the learning.

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The 5As Framework for Increasing Impact of Learning in Organizations

The Performance Improvement Blog

You don’t get as much value as you should out of your organization’s training and development programs In fact, the number of trainees who apply new learning in their organizations is estimated to be only about 15% to 20%. The 5As Framework is an easy to remember aid for ensuring that any learning intervention, whether classroom training, elearning, coaching and mentoring, self-directed study, internships, etc.,

Top 10 Questions to Evaluate a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

In a discussion started by Camilla Keen on LinkedIn, she asks, “In order to find out and evaluate if a company has an effective learning culture, what would be your top ten questions?” I commented: Are leaders communicating the importance of learning (acquiring new knowledge, skills, and capabilities) and holding managers accountable for learning and applying that learning to making a difference for the organization?

Creating a Learning Culture in Highly Regulated Industries

The Performance Improvement Blog

During the first session of a workshop I facilitate for ATD, one of the participants asked, “What does a learning culture look like in an electrical power generation plant, where most of the training is for the purpose of meeting industry regulations?” This is an excellent question that got me thinking about learning in a highly regulated work environment. First of all, one-time, or even annual programs, is not how the vast majority of people learn.

Becoming a Learning Culture: Competing in an Age of Disruption

The Performance Improvement Blog

Any company, faced with these kinds of disruptive forces must keep learning. Employees must learn how to use new computers and new apps, how to operate new, high tech machinery, how to be responsive to customer demands, how to create innovative products and services, how to manage a multi-cultural, multi-generational workforce, how to work effectively in cross-functional teams, and how to plan for a future that is constantly in flux. Learning is just-in-time, on-demand.

Are Managers Too Busy to Learn?

The Performance Improvement Blog

One of the barriers to creating and sustaining a learning culture in organizations is the no-time myth. Managers resist attending formal training events and participating in other kinds of learning activities (elearning, mentoring, coaching, action-learning, communities of practice, internal wikis, etc.) The problem is that managers don’t make learning a high priority. This is learning, too, and takes little, if any, extra time.

Four False Assumptions About Leadership Development

The Performance Improvement Blog

I don’t think that organizations are going to close this leadership gap until they confront four false assumptions about learning that are deeply embedded in their cultures. Once is enough – This is the belief that people can learn something as complex and ego threatening as leadership the first time they are exposed to the material. and then applying that new found learning. Deloitte has identified “leadership development” as a major challenge for HR leaders in 2015.

6 Steps To Creating Learning Ecosystems (And Why You Should Bother)

Learnnovators

70:20:10 has shone a spotlight on the limits of formal learning. In contrast, social and experiential learning continue to be veritable goldmines of productivity, placing learners at the centre of their story and demanding a major shift from Learning & Development professionals. Central to this cultural shift is the understanding that learning happens by learners, not to them. That’s where learning ecosystems come in.

Personal Learning Networks: For Ongoing Learning in a Connected World

ID Reflections

I have recently joined the open section of #MSLOC 430 - a graduate course in the Master''s Program in Learning and Organizational Change at Northwestern University. This is the first week and I am absolutely looking forward to exploring the topics, learning from the other participants and participating in exciting conversations. Here''s a list of related posts on learning in a networked world. A PLN is an enabler of such learning.

Eight Leader Habits of a Learning Culture

The Performance Improvement Blog

Eight leader habits are essential to a learning culture. These are behaviors ingrained in the routines and rituals of organizations that are continually learning and learning how to learn. Leaders in these organizations do the following: Send the message - Leaders communicate the importance of learning to the organization. Build trust - Employees will invest time and effort in learning if they trust their managers. This learning cannot be left to chance.

Leaders Learning about Learning

The Performance Improvement Blog

I explained the limitations of formal training and the need for taking an organizational learning perspective. I argued that in order for any kind of learning intervention (training, coaching, mentoring, action learning, etc.) to have a positive impact on achieving the organization’s goals, managers had to take an active role in supporting learning. They wanted to know specifically what they could do to facilitate learning.

Aligning Employee Learning with the Organization

The Performance Improvement Blog

Improving employee learning and performance in organizations today means systems change. I wish it were otherwise, but learning is not just a classroom activity anymore, it must be a total system activity that takes into account strategic goals of the organization, the culture of the organization (values, beliefs, artifacts, structure, etc.), and the quality of the learning interventions (formal training, coaching, mentoring, self-directed study, action learning, etc.).

Learning in a Managing Minds Company

The Performance Improvement Blog

The future of how we learn in our organizations is a popular topic. But unless you are responsible for developing, delivering, managing, and measuring training and learning, keeping up with the latest learning technologies can be overwhelming. The training and learning technology discussions miss the point. Our approach is to suggest new ways of facilitating learning that fit into managing minds. Learning independently. Learning interactively.

Learning in a Managing Minds Company

The Performance Improvement Blog

The future of how we learn in our organizations is a popular topic. But unless you are responsible for developing, delivering, managing, and measuring training and learning, keeping up with the latest learning technologies can be overwhelming. The training and learning technology discussions miss the point. Our approach is to suggest new ways of facilitating learning that fit into managing minds. Learning independently. Learning interactively.

Learning for a Rapidly Changing World

The Performance Improvement Blog

I don’t think we want to subject adults to the kind of learning experiences typical of a 13-year-old’s classroom. But I do agree that all workers today need to be continually learning and our institutions need to recognize and support this learning. In the Knowledge Economy, learning cannot end with school. Learning at the individual, team, and whole organization levels must be continuous. E-learning programs are not sufficient.

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Sahana Chattopadhyay – Crystal Balling with Learnnovators

Learnnovators

ABOUT SAHANA CHATTOPADHYAY (Social Learning & Collaboration Strategist, Performance Consultant Exploring Emergent Learning, Blogger). Sahana Chattopadhyay is a performance consultant and an L&D professional with 15 years of experience in the field of academia and organizational learning. Her passion is to help organizations become learning organizations through social and collaborative learning. What is your vision for the learning community?

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Re-thinking Learning and Performance from a Business Standpoint

ID Reflections

Yesterday, I wrote a post on Learning vs. Performance – the Dichotomy. It was more of a theoretical exposition on why learning doesn’t necessarily translate into performance, and delved into some of the psychological and behavioral aspects of the same. Why is it that learning and training don’t translate into performance? In today’s post, I have tried to analyze the learning – performance dichotomy from a more practical standpoint.

How to Have a Learning Conversation

The Performance Improvement Blog

Employees learn best when they have guidance, support, and performance feedback from someone they trust and respect in the organization. Ideally, this is a boss, supervisor, coach, or mentor who knows why that learning is important and how it aligns with strategic business goals. Managers, at all organizational levels, should have regular learning-focused conversations with the people who report to them.

A Manager's View of Employee Learning

The Performance Improvement Blog

I love the sense of understanding, enthusiasm and acceptance the leadership team conveys here regarding their role in learning. As you might expect, based on my input to a previous blog (3/25, Training Isn’t Learning ), I was delighted to see the emphasis on the necessary role of the manager! For me, ‘accountable’ means managers are as much, and maybe more, responsible as the individual learner for applying learning and delivering results.

The State of Instructional Design

Tom Spiglanin

The conversation erupted on social media, as it has before, about the state of affairs in the field of Learning and Development, or L&D. We shifted to blended learning, with Brent Schlenker making the point that blended solutions are simply good solutions; there’s no need to give that solution a name. Shannon Tipton added, “We want to make this whole learning thing so difficult but it’s not.”

Learning to Learn from Evaluation of Learning

The Performance Improvement Blog

Each approach to evaluation of training has something to contribute to assessing the impact of formal training on employee learning. The real value is in organizational learning from evaluation. Measuring change is part of good evaluation, but unless we can get leaders in an organization to learn from that data and apply that knowledge to improving performance, what’s the point? . Learning from evaluation depends on asking the right questions.

The 70:20:10 Lens

Learnnovators

For example, we needn’t assign 70% of our time, effort and money on OTJ interventions, 20% on social learning, and 10% on formal training. Similarly, we shouldn’t mandate that our target audience aligns its learning activity according to these proportions. Our target audience does undertake 70% of its learning on the job, 20% via interacting with others, and 10% off the job (or thereabouts).

Deeper eLearning Design: Part 2 – Practice Makes Perfect

Learnnovators

The goal of this series is to build upon good implementations of instructional design, and go deeper into the nuances of what makes learning really work. We started with objectives and we’ll continue on through concepts, examples, emotional elements, and putting it together, but here we’re talking about good practice for learning. The formal goals for learning are twofold: 1. Retention over time until the learning is needed, and.

The Unexamined Leadership Program is Not Worth Doing

The Performance Improvement Blog

I’m talking about a systematic, evidence-based look at why it was done, what was done, how it was done, what happened as a result, how it can be improved, and what the organization learned from the process. Validation that the correct learning solution has been identified and suggestions for programme improvement. Advice about how to get the most from your L&D budget by considering the workplace learning environment. I would add: Reinforcement of learning.

50 Ways to Lever Learning

The Performance Improvement Blog

In a learning culture , formal training is just one of many methods used to facilitate employee learning. In a learning culture, we start with the performance goal and then select the mix of methods that will help employees acquire and retain the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and beliefs they need in order to achieve those goals. Instructor-centered class (fact to face) – traditional classroom in which instructor controls the content and learning process.

7 Strategies to Facilitate “Working Out Loud”

Learnnovators

Community members learn together, share feedback, take onus of building the domain. Talented coders and developers come together to learn, share and co-create. If we critically examine the characteristics of networked learning, it becomes evident that these are also qualities that foster and enable communities to thrive which in turn pull creative, passionate individuals to the workforce. We all know that true learning takes place through dialogues.

The Learning Alliance and the Four Levels of Training Evaluation

The Performance Improvement Blog

They’ve added some critical elements to the original “Four Levels”, including: starting evaluation planning by clarifying intended results of training; taking into consideration what happens before and after a training event that facilitates learning; the supervisor/mentor/coach partnership in learning; and "organizational drivers" to results.