Clark Quinn

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Self-regulation & PKM

Clark Quinn

I’m a fan of Harold Jarche’s Seek-Sense-Share (SSS) model for Personal Knowledge Mastery (PKM). I was also reading about self-regulated learning , and a proposed model for that. And I realized they could be related. Naturally, I created a diagram. To start with, Harold’s model is oriented around coping with the information flow as a component of learning. Two additional things.

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Because quality matters

Clark Quinn

I was reflecting on some of the actions my colleagues and I take. These are, in particular, colleagues that have been contributing to the field for a long time, ones who know what they’re talking about and that I therefore respect.  I retweeted one who called for being careful of the source in message. I’ve supported another who has been on a crusade against myths. And I joined with some others to promote quality elearning. And it led me to wonder why. Why care? Why take risks and potentially upset people? And I realized that it’s because I care; because quality matters.

Kaihan Krippendorff Keynote Mindmap

Clark Quinn

At a private event, I had a chance to hear Kaihan Krippendorff talk about thinking differently about innovation.  He used an 8P’s model as a framework to illustrate how to think differently. strategy

How to learn and learn-to-learn

Clark Quinn

I was asked by a colleague to answer some questions for a project on how to learn.  I naturally decided to answer in a blog post ;). In your working life, how have you learnt effectively from experience, please provide an example if possible? While obviously reveling in the positive ones, I look for constructive feedback that I can try to improve upon. Stay curious, my friends. Look for links.

How to Choose Between On-Demand and Instructor-Led Training

Not sure whether to offer on-demand or instructor-led training, or both? Each has its pros and cons and your decision will depend on your organization’s needs and goals. Download this eBook to learn which option is better at scale, as well as the resources needed to implement each training type.

‘Cooking up’ some learning

Clark Quinn

So, I like to cook (not bake, but cook). And possibly the first thing I ever really mastered was enchiladas.   I’d put a chunk of beef in the crockpot, with a can of enchilada sauce and half-to-most of a beer.  (I experimented with making my own sauce for a while, but ultimately the differences weren’t worth it.) With some extra across the top. It really slows things down.

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What’s Your Learning Tool Stack?

Clark Quinn

I woke up this morning thinking about the tools we use at various levels. Yeah, my life is exciting ;). Seriously, this is important, as the tools we use and provide through the organization impact the effectiveness with which people can work. What this represents is people talking about the tools they use to do their jobs, and I reckon it’s important for us to talk about tools for learning.

Learning Through the Wild

Clark Quinn

So last week I was in the wilderness for some more time, this time with family. And there were several learnings as an outcome that are worth sharing. As context, Yosemite National Park is one of the world’s truly beautiful places, with the valley as an accessible way to see the glacier-carved rock. And then there’s one other option: the High Sierra Camps. meta-learning

70:20:10 and the Learning Curve

Clark Quinn

My colleague Charles Jennings recently posted on the value of autonomous learning (worth reading!), sparked by a diagram provided by another ITA colleague, Jane Hart (that I also thought was insightful). In Charles’ post he also included an IBM diagram that triggered some associations. The point was that the closer to the work that learning is, the more value. Hence the revolution. :).

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Skill based learning – How it drives an organization’s performance

Training and learning organizations today play an active role in contributing to the bottom line of any organization by aligning their objectives to the immediate business objectives. This provides a solid ground for cost justification and encourages businesses to place training groups right where they should be, at the heart of a growing, thriving, learning culture.

Activities for Integrating Learning

Clark Quinn

I’ve been working on a learning design that integrates developing social media skills with developing specific competencies, aligned with real work.  It’s an interesting integration, and I drafted a pedagogy that I believe accomplishes the task.  It draws heavily on the notion of activity -based learning. For your consideration. As they work on the deliverable, they’re supported.

Organizational Effectiveness for L&D?

Clark Quinn

Last week included an interesting series of events and conversations. There was a formal event on innovation in learning technology (that was only partly so), and a presentation by a colleague. also had a couple of conversations, one with said colleague following his more formal event, and another with another colleague before the initial event. And from that latter conversation came an interesting revelation. The concept was Organizational Effectiveness, and the question is the relevance to L&D. So, for instance,  I see much elearning that doesn’t reflect serious design. strategy

xAPI conceptualized

Clark Quinn

A couple of weeks ago, I had the pleasure of attending the xAPI Base Camp, to present on content strategy. While I was there, I remembered that I have some colleagues who don’t see the connection between xAPI and learning. And it occurred to me that I hadn’t seen a good diagram that helped explain how this all worked. So So I asked and was confirmed in my suspicion.

Wild thinking

Clark Quinn

Our everyday lives are decreasingly connected to nature. We’re increasingly separated from the context we evolved in. Is that a good thing? Now, our relationship with nature hasn’t always been one of benevolent protection, as Roderick Nash has let us know. But are there reasons to consider wilderness benefits for our thinking and learning? The evidence appears to say yes. Happy trails!

Whitepaper: When The LMS Isn’t Enough

In this whitepaper, you will discover the main reasons why the LMS alone is no longer meeting the needs of the modern learner. More importantly, you will learn what you can do to enhance its value.

The Inaugural Jay Cross Memorial Award winner is…

Clark Quinn

Reposted from the Internet Time Alliance website: The Internet Time Alliance Jay Cross Memorial Award is presented to a workplace learning professional who has contributed in positive ways to the field of Real Learning and is reflective of Jay’s lifetime of work. Recipients champion workplace and social learning practices inside their organisation and/or on the wider stage. It’s wider than that.

Learning in context

Clark Quinn

In preparation for the upcoming FocusOn Learning Conference, where I’ll be running a workshop about cognitive science for L&D, not just for learning but also for mobile and performance support, I was thinking about how  context can be leveraged to provide more optimal learning  and performance. Naturally, I had to diagram it, so let me talk through it, and you let me know what you think.

Infrastructure and integration

Clark Quinn

When I wrote the L&D Revolution book, I created a chart that documented the different stages that L&D could go through on the way.  I look at it again, and I see that I got (at least) one thing slightly off, as I talked about content and it’s more, it’s about integration and infrastructure.   And I reckon I should share my thinking, then and now. The premise of the chart was that there are stages of maturity across the major categories of areas L&D should be aware of. And for each of those, I had two subcategories. And I mapped each at four stages of maturity.

‘Form’ing learning

Clark Quinn

Last week I ran a workshop for an online university that is working to improve it’s learning design. Substantially. They’re ramping up their staff abilities, and we’d talked about how I could help. They have ‘content’, but wanted to improve the learning design around this. So, first of all, my focus was on formative evaluation.  If we take activity-based learning seriously, we need to ensure that there are meaningful tasks set that can provide feedback. Ok, so not every formative evaluation should be such a situation. Then we moved on to more hands-on work. desig

Seven Simple Secrets to Off-the-Shelf Course Success

Off-the-shelf elearning is applicable for a wide audience, but it won’t address your organization’s unique situations or distinctive content. So are these courses all that helpful? For sure! Read on for 7 secrets to make off-the-self learning your own.

China is mobile!

Clark Quinn

I’ve had the fortune to be hear in China speaking on mlearning. And there are a couple of interesting revelations that I hadn’t really recognized when I did the same last year that I thought I’d share. But they’re all phones, I seem to see few tablets. They vary in size from phones to phablets, but they’re here. Which leads to a second recognition. mobile

Collaborative Modelling in AR (and VR)

Clark Quinn

A number of years ago, when we were at the height of the hype about Virtual Worlds (computer rendered 3D social worlds, e.g. Second Life), I was thinking about the affordances. And one that I thought was intriguing was co-creating, in particular collaboratively creating models that were explanatory and predictive. And in thinking again about Augmented Reality, I realized we had this opportunity again. Models are hard enough to capture in 2D, particularly if they’re complex. Having a 3rd dimension can be valuable. you could build things) and you could build models.

Two separate systems?

Clark Quinn

I frequently say that L&D needs to move from just ensuring optimal execution to also supporting continual innovation. Can these co-exist, or are they fundamentally different?  I really don’t know, but it’s worth pondering. On the other hand, there is quite a bit of expression for more flexible systems, a more podular approach. This is what led to our Coherent Organization model.

Augmenting AR for Learning

Clark Quinn

We’re hearing more and more about AR (Augmented Reality), and one of it’s core elements is layering information on top of the world. But in a conversation the other night, it occurred to me that we could push that information to be even more proactive in facilitating learning. And this comes from the use of models. The key idea I want to leverage is the use of models to foster is the use of models to predict or explain what happens in the world. The question is, can we not just illuminate them, but can we ‘exercise’ them. ? design technology

Leaving performance reviews behind: Where to start [Guide]

Is your company ready to move beyond the annual performance review? Where do you start? What are the keys to success? In this guide, you’ll gain an understanding of: the forces driving change, three foundations of success and take a deep dive into the skills gap many managers have that will sink your efforts before they start and how to address them.

Coherent Implications

Clark Quinn

One of the things to do with models is use them as the basis to explain and predict. And right now I’m working with the Coherent Organization model and looking at the implications for decisions. How does this model map to choices you make in the organization? At the work team level, you want people to be able to communicate with one another effectively, and collaborate to find answers.

A complex look at task assignments

Clark Quinn

I was thinking (one morning at 4AM, when I was wishing I was asleep) about designing assignment structures that matched my activity-based learning model. And a model emerged that I managed to recall when I finally did get up.  I’ve been workshopping it a bit since, tuning some details. No claim that it’s there yet, by the way. There could even be a model presentation.


Clark Quinn

So, if you haven’t figured it out yet, I do mindmaps.  As I’ve recited before, I started doing it as a way to occupy my brain enough so I could listen to keynotes, but occasionally I use it to other purposes, such as representing structure or even planning. Mindmaps are a visual way of representing knowledge. And the links can be plain or directional. design meta-learning

The Grail of Effective and Engaging Learning Experiences

Clark Quinn

There’s a considerable gap between what we can be doing, and what we are doing. When you look at what’s out there, we see that there are several way in which we fall short of the mark. While there are many dimensions that  could be considered, for the sake of simplicity let’s characterize the two important ones as effectiveness of our learning and the engagement of the experience.

Attract, Engage, and Develop Talent using Open Badges: An IBM case study

Companies have an incredible opportunity to use badges to help attract, engage, recognize and develop talent. There have been significant developments around digital credentials and particularly the fast rise of badges and micro-credentials. Learning Professionals need to be aware of what's happening and innovators should be taking a leading role. In this session, David will go through the well-known IBM Open Badge Program to help explain badge programs.

A richer suite of support

Clark Quinn

While it’s easy to talk about how we need to support the transition from novice to expert, it might help to be a little more detailed. While it’s easy to say that the role of formal learning wanes, and the role of informal learning ramps up, what are the types of support we might look to? As they start performing however, their needs change. There are cultural factors as well. Can you?

Working and learning out loud

Clark Quinn

I’ve been thinking about some of the talk around the Future of Work, and in addition to the free flow of information I recently posted about from the Coherent Organization, I think working out loud is another component. Inspired by a post from my colleague Harold Jarche, this is how I see it, in actionable terms.  (And I expect this is also part of Jane Bozarth’s Show Your Work , but I’ve yet to get my mitts on a copy, mea culpa.). The point is to make your work visible. And there are two dimensions: within the organization, and outside the organization. strategy social

Collaborating when it matters

Clark Quinn

A dear friend and colleague just wrote about his recent (and urgent) chemo and surgery.  I won’t bore you with the details (the odds are you don’t know him), but one thing stuck with me that I do want to share. didn’t know that the lack of data was so profound that intuition and personal experience, not data, would play a central role in the decisions.” ” Collaboration was critical. There were two different domains in play, and they had to work and play well together. If you don’t know, look for preferences. The details are not trivial, they’re  critical.

Content isn’t a silo

Clark Quinn

I mentioned in my previous post that I was talking at the xAPI camp about content strategy, and on the way in I created a new diagram to convey a concept I wanted to discuss.  Of course one of the things I agitate about for the revolution is that L&D can’t hide away but has to start engaging across the business.   And, let me add, that’s only increasing. Our silos are breaking down.

Best Practices for Launching an LMS

When launching a new platform to deliver customer and partner training, there are a few key items to keep in mind. The best and simplest way to stay organized during this process – and be able to measure success – is to follow the tried-and-true practices outlined in this eBook. Click to download.

The probability of wasting money

Clark Quinn

Designing learning is a probability game.  To paraphrase Dorothy Parker, you can lead a learner to learning, but you can’t make them think. What I mean is that the likelihood that the learning actually sticks is a result of a myriad of design decisions, and many elements contribute to that likelihood.  It will vary by learner, despite your endeavors, but you increase the probability that the desired outcome is achieved by following what’s know about how people learn. This is the point of learning engineering, applying learning science to the design of learning experiences.