Clive on Learning

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The changing skill set of the learning professional

Clive on Learning

Skills define us. They are what make us useful and productive. They are the foundation of our achievements. On our death bed, it is our skills that we will reflect on with pride. These could be physical skills – our ability to knit jumpers, drive vehicles, perform gymnastics, play the violin, cook tasty food, swim or make beautiful furniture. Yes, skills are what make us what we are. Not convinced?

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Skills: The last frontier for digital learning

Clive on Learning

I’ll cut straight to the point. To most learners and most learning professionals, digital learning is a way to meet requirements for knowledge. Even in its most contemporary forms – responsive, massive, open, mobile, point-of-need, video-based and gamified – the priority is still knowledge, whether that is of facts, concepts, principles, processes, rules, procedures or spatial positioning.

The four responsibilities of the learning professional

Clive on Learning

I have been lucky in my job to spend time with many hundreds of learning and development practitioners over the past ten years or so, in all sectors of the economy and in all parts of the world. Almost without exception I find them to be enthusiastic, friendly and determined to do the best possible job. Let’s take an example … What would you do? What would you do? No problem. link].

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Compelling content hooks you in and won't let go

Clive on Learning

We are told that learners are no longer able to concentrate on content that's more than four or five minutes long. And there's no doubt that, when it comes to consuming information, we'd prefer it concise. After all, we want that information to help us achieve some goal and we don't want to take too long in the process. GIGIGO - get in, get it, get out. We start with storytelling. Good luck!

[Study] The Anatomy of a Training Course

Let’s face it, compliance is not the same as learning

Clive on Learning

A while back I did something quite unusual. completed a self-study e-learning programme, as a student, not as a consultant running their eye over someone else's work. Some time later, having had the chance to reflect on the experience, I can't resist making a few comments. I'm not going to tell you what the programme was or who it was made by. question, you scored nothing. achieved this. Job done.

Why micro-learning works for me

Clive on Learning

Over the past twelve months, micro-learning has quietly worked itself into my daily routine. Absolutely every day (I’m on a 360-day streak), I practise my French using the Duolingo app. Not quite so often (because it takes a lot of concentration), but still regularly, I do brain training using Peak. And if the task slips my memory, I get nagging notifications on my Apple Watch.

Do no harm - the duty of the learning professional

Clive on Learning

One of the key differences between professions and other forms of occupation is the fact that professionals are bound by ethical codes. If they contravene these codes they are liable to be disbarred from the profession. Doctors sign a Hippocratic oath, which binds them to do no harm to their patients. But you don’t become a professional just by calling yourself one.

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Seven ways that video can transform learning at work

Clive on Learning

Video is very much the medium of the moment. Not only do we spend many hours each day watching it on our TVs, it has become an integral part of the online experience. An ever-increasing proportion of the population does not only consume video, it creates and shares it with a worldwide Internet audience. Whereas once video cameras cost many hundreds, if not tens of thousands of pounds, they are now integrated for no additional cost in computers, stills cameras and mobile phones. Amazingly, it can also be quicker and easier to produce than slide shows or textual content. Video is so versatile.

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Take Charge of your eLearning environment

Engaging your learner - four dos and four don'ts

Clive on Learning

Whether you’re teaching in a classroom, developing some e-learning or producing a video, you’ll be concerned about engaging your learners. Because, if learners aren’t engaged they’ll pay little attention to what you’re offering and they’re very unlikely to retain anything. You can spend a fortune trying to engage learners, but the secrets to engagement do not demand you break the bank. DON''TS 1.

TV very much alive for learning professionals

Clive on Learning

On Wednesday, on his Plan B blog , my old mate Donald Clark told us that TV is dying, and I believe him. But in some ways it is just changing form. Last night I tuned in to a live stream of the second episode of LearningNow TV , a monthly one-hour news magazine for learning professionals. Nigel Paine presents a mix of webcam interviews and professionally-produced pieces.

Clive's Cone (if Dale can have one so can I)

Clive on Learning

Are you fed up with all that pseudoscience with which the learning profession is plagued? If so, join the Debunker Club. For April Fool''s Day we''re going after Dales Cone of Experience. debunkings

E-learning: what is it good for?

Clive on Learning

First of all, before we get started, let me just clarify that I am not talking about e-learning in the broadest sense, encompassing live online sessions and all sorts of online collaboration. prefer to refer to these as learning technologies, perhaps even ''digital learning''. No, what I’m referring to in this post is the use of interactive self-study materials, particularly in the workplace.

Get an Exclusive Articulate Storyline Game Show Template from eLearning Brothers

Blended learning report shows where work needs to be done

Clive on Learning

It''s not often that anyone researches blended learning. After all, blending is not remotely sexy, even though it now seems to be the strategy of choice for most employers around the world. Blended Learning: Current Use, Challenges and Best Practices summarises the responses from more than a hundred different organisations. How well established? different ingredients per blend. blended learning

Seven ways in which stories power learning

Clive on Learning

I’d never written a film script before. The nearest I’d got to so-called creative writing was penning the dialogue for interactive scenarios, so this was a brave move. To be honest, I was pushed hard by my colleague Asatuurs Keim, a film-maker with a passion for storytelling and someone who believes we have failed to realise the full potential of film as a vehicle for learning at work.

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E-learning is dead, long live learning

Clive on Learning

I produced this short video to accompany the Learning Insights 2012 Report produced by Kineo for e.learning age magazine and due to be launched today. I'll be posting about it over the next few weeks

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Towards Maturity 2015 benchmark shows just how much we've got stuck

Clive on Learning

Last week I attended a preview of this year’s Towards Maturity benchmark results, due for public release on November 5th (you can register for the launch webinar on this page ). In case you don’t know Towards Maturity, they were established in 2003 as a government-funded body to promote the use of learning technologies in workplace learning across the UK. research

Seven Simple Secrets to Off-the-Shelf Course Success

What does it take to be a good e-learning designer?

Clive on Learning

With the Serious eLearning Manifesto drawing attention to a current lack of e-learning design skills, as evidenced by more than a little tedious and ineffective content out there, it got me thinking about what it takes to be a good designer. Or rather, it was actually Stephen Walsh at City & Guilds Kineo who started this train of thought as he sought out my help in tracking down a great Lead Designer. An ability to empathise with their audience: this is a critical ''teaching'' quality and sometimes lacking in those who view e-learning as an engineering discipline.

The learner speaks

Clive on Learning

Towards Maturity are well known for their benchmark studies which allow organisations to compare their experiences in applying learning technologies and to learn from what the best organisations are doing. have found these studies useful in helping to understand the various challenges that organisations are facing and the choices they are making in terms of their use of technologies. However, the data comes from learning professionals and there was always the suspicion that their perspective on what was going on in their organisations could be quite different from that of their employees.

Why scenarios are the future of e-learning

Clive on Learning

I hate to say it, after so many years of trying to reverse the trend, but it seems that far too many people (finance directors excepted) really dislike e-learning. First let me be clear, I am using a narrow definition of e-learning here. I''m referring to those interactive self-study materials which employees sit and complete on their own (if they can''t get someone else to do it for them). I''m not referring to virtual classrooms, online content such as web articles and videos, or any form of social media. People don''t dislike all e-learning. Scenarios are the future of e-learning.

The teacher as storyteller

Clive on Learning

A few days ago, I sat down to write a post explaining why I thought stories were such a powerful tool for learning. In my research, I came across a post I originally published in 2005. Once I had got over the shock of realising that this post was a full ten years old, I decided to share it again, given I probably now have a very different audience. No, you guessed it, it was the story.

Living up to the Promise of eLearning: Closing the Learning-Doing Gap

My tips for better blends

Clive on Learning

This is my self-proclaimed year of the blend and I''m releasing a new book on blended learning in the new year, so it''s time to collect my thoughts. There is nothing inherently wonderful about a blended solution. Every day for the next week or so I will be sharing some of my tips for better blends. blended learning

Why e-learning should be in perpetual beta

Clive on Learning

When you run a workshop for the first time it can be a bit nerve-wracking. After all, youve never tested your ideas for content and activities against a real audience before. You can only guess at how long any session will actually take to complete. You dont know for certain whether your design will work in meeting the underlying learning need. So, you cross your fingers and toes and give your ideas their first airing. Inevitably, some things will have worked well and some less so. This is normal and not a cause for alarm. You set about designing version 2. Why right first time?

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The Really Useful eLearning Instruction Manual is here and it is really useful

Clive on Learning

Along with my co-contributors, I’m delighted to be able to let you know about this new publication, edited by my good friend Rob Hubbard, which celebrates 25 years of the eLearning Network. This is what the publishers have to say about the book: “Technology has revolutionised every aspect of our lives and how we learn is no exception. Table of contents So What is eLearning?

The new age of exploration

Clive on Learning

The rise of instruction From the earliest days of computer-assisted learning, way back in the mid 1970s, the dominant teaching strategy has been instruction. So dominant in fact, that those tasked with devising and assembling technology-based learning solutions have been called instructional designers ever since. First of all, let’s just clarify what we mean by this term. instructional design

Attract, Engage, and Develop Talent using Open Badges: An IBM case study

The new self-directed learning toolkit

Clive on Learning

For practically thirty years now, the default corporate solution for any sort of formal, self-directed learning intervention has been self-study e-learning, specifically some form of interactive tutorial. While this format certainly can deliver the goods, and provides a simple, trackable means to monitor compliance, it frequently falls down on many fronts: Interactive tutorials are time-consuming, expensive and complex to put together. It takes a great deal of expertise to do a really good job of designing an engaging solution, and this is in short supply. What''s stopping you?

Why is e-learning so unpopular?

Clive on Learning

Over the years I have spent many thousands of hours in conversations with l&d people. As you would expect, there is some commonality in the sorts of questions I get asked. Over the next few weeks, I am going to try and answer those questions in a series of posts, not because I have any problem with answering the questions directly, but for the benefit of all those l&d people whom I never get to meet. The first is: Why is e-learning so unpopular? In reality, this sentiment is not always expressed as a question. It’s just as likely to be phrased as ‘I don’t like it’. Virtual classrooms?

Oppia - just like the good old days

Clive on Learning

Oppia is an open-source tool from Google which allows anyone to create interactive learning dialogues. Here''s Google''s explainer: There''s also a useful review at TechCrunch. I''ve had a look at several examples of Oppia dialogues and, to be honest, they are still pretty primitive. However, I like the idea. instructional design

Transforming learning and development

Clive on Learning

Over on the Onlignment blog, I have, throughout 2012, been setting out a model for a transformation in workplace learning and development. started the series by arguing the case for transformation. Establishing a learning architecture and infrastructure that recognises these unique characteristics. Putting in place processes for improved performance needs analysis and blended solution design.

How to Create a Customer Training Strategy

Over-teaching experts and under-teaching novices

Clive on Learning

No two learners are the same. There are seven billion people in the world each with their own unique life experiences, which have in turn shaped their aspirations, their personality, their attitudes, their preferences and their capabilities. It goes without saying that one of the greatest mistakes we can make as designers of learning experiences is to treat them all as if they were the same. The most common manifestation of this, in my experience, is to provide the same solution for those with a great deal of prior knowledge as for those who are relative beginners. These are the extremes.

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